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Horsehair rotobrush-when to use?

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
I got a rotobrush set for christmas...great stuff! I'm a tad unsure of the order in which to brush. I seem to remember someone saying brass, nylon, then horsehair. I have all three, but it seems like the horsehair is much more aggressive than the brass. I've been only using the brass, (after scraping), then the nylon and it really polishes the P-Tex. If I use the horsehair last, it really dulls the "shine". What's up with these things?
Thanks all!!
post #2 of 15
Horsehair is a structure cleanout brush, not a polishing brush.

Use the horse after the brass, esp. if your skis have a fine structure and you are using hard waxes.
post #3 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by comprex View Post
Horsehair is a structure cleanout brush, not a polishing brush.

Use the horse after the brass, esp. if your skis have a fine structure and you are using hard waxes.
Brass is used first before waxing to open microstructure and let base absorb more wax! After Brass you should use a Roto-Velcro wrap to remove micro hairs from brass or steel brushing

Brown Horse hair is the 1st brush you use after waxing and scraping! Read the rest below for polishing choices

Here ya go!!!

http://www.skiwax.ca/tp/cb_roto.php
post #4 of 15
Thread Starter 
THANKS!!, (I'm learning).

I did not know the brass was for pre-wax. I've been using it for 1st step wax removal. Sounds like the roto-velcro wraped with fibertex is very important. I have the Maplus set, (Slidewright), but I don't see a velcro drum in their online catalog. Suggestions?
post #5 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by C.B. View Post
THANKS!!, (I'm learning).

I did not know the brass was for pre-wax. I've been using it for 1st step wax removal. Sounds like the roto-velcro wraped with fibertex is very important. I have the Maplus set, (Slidewright), but I don't see a velcro drum in their online catalog. Suggestions?
Red Creek and MaPlus fit the same shaft (I have a couple of Maplus brushes from Terry) but mostly Red Creek.


http://www.reliableracing.com/detail.cfm?edp=10628048

http://www.reliableracing.com/detail.cfm?edp=10628055
post #6 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by C.B. View Post
THANKS!!, (I'm learning).

I did not know the brass was for pre-wax. I've been using it for 1st step wax removal.

The Swix School videos for race ski prep show using a mid-coarse bronze brush for first stage after waxing.

http://www.swixschool.no/web_tysk/index2.html

So you are not all that misinformed
post #7 of 15
I think it also depends on the diameter of the wire/bristle. Not that I know anything!
post #8 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnnys Zoo View Post
I think it also depends on the diameter of the wire/bristle. Not that I know anything!
Certainly.

Brass is softer than steel in the same thickness so steel can be made finer than horsehair, and so we have red creek's recommended sequence:

Horsehair - FINE steel - FINE nylon.
post #9 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by comprex View Post
The Swix School videos for race ski prep show using a mid-coarse bronze brush for first stage after waxing.

http://www.swixschool.no/web_tysk/index2.html

So you are not all that misinformed
Mid coarse Bronze is not Brass!

Special fine Steel brush is used mainly for cleaning the base but not usually one of the basic brushes most "Home'" tuners use or own possibly because it is expensive and fairly new addition to the red Creek line.

If you are racing World Cup by all means spend the big dough on a Special Steel
post #10 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Atomicman View Post
Mid coarse Bronze is not Brass!
quite right, MCB is stiffer and often sharper.
post #11 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by C.B. View Post
I got a rotobrush set for christmas...great stuff! I'm a tad unsure of the order in which to brush. I seem to remember someone saying brass, nylon, then horsehair.
I've been typically using the Maplus brass to expose the structure, then horsehair and finally polishing with the nylon. The skis are running great and frankly haven't tried any other combination since I'm getting quick, easy and excellent results.
post #12 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by comprex View Post
The Swix School videos for race ski prep show using a mid-coarse bronze brush for first stage after waxing.
So you are not all that misinformed
But it's wrong info... even if it comes from Swix Brass brush is first thing that touches ski base. After that you use Fibertex, then comes wax, and after scrapping there's only nylon brush (or fine nylon or Wild Boar Brush for fluoro powders). Nothing else. No brass brushes after waxing.
Considering I was actually serviceman in World cup for a while, I have "a bit" of experiences
post #13 of 15
primoz, welcome to the forum, nice to see someone with your education in ski prep here.

I use the horse hair as a brush for hard waxes, I believe I read some where to use it for cold waxes to remove static ?

As a home tuner for years, I have never done all the work guy's talk about here.

I sharpen the edges then just wax over what ever is there. The only time I use any wax remover is if I need to drip in some P-Tex. I normally wax ever 3 or 4 ski days. Touch up the tune every ski day.

I use the Red Creek roto brush, and have a nylon, combo and horsehair. I have only used the combo a few times.

My skis glide great.
post #14 of 15
It's not really problem for hobby skiing. There's few things why. First, there's not even one single hobby skier who would feel difference between properly prepared skis for WC race and "a bit less properly prepared" skis for everyday's skiing. Once you had skis on your feet for 20 years on daily (or even twice a day) basis for 9 months a year, you can feel even small difference, and most of time, you don't even need stop watches to see which ski is better... even if difference is really small.
And second, it really doesn't matter if ski is 10% faster or not. What matters for hobby skiing is, that you save few 100eur (or $), if you don't spend them on fluoro powders, and you can get another week or two of skiing with this money instead When it comes to race, every 0.01sec counts, and that's different story, but for non-competitive skiing, it really doesn't matter, so it's no big deal if you skip step or two, or if you use cheaper low or even non fluoro waxes.
It's still important to have skis normally maintained, because it's still much more fun skiing with normal skis, but that's about it.
As far as different brushes are concerned, there's no strict rules about hard or soft brushes. But there are millions of small secrets you learn through the years, and they go from mixing on first look impossible combinations of waxes, to stuff like which brush to use for which snow type. Using softer brush, or even horse hair brush for cold snow and hard waxes is for example on of those things.
post #15 of 15
I do use fluoro waxes for my skis. I enjoy the way they glide and can tell the difference. I have been using Racewax.com fluoro wax so far this season. I don't think it has the same slippery feeling as Dominator Hyperzoom. I will find out Saturday about 7:50AM when I step into my bindings. I waxed the skis with Hyperzoom last Monday night before I came home. When I step into the skis with hyperzoom they want to move around with other waxes I don't feel that slippery feeling.
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EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Tuning, Maintenance and Repairs › Horsehair rotobrush-when to use?