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Repairing a gouge in ski base

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 
Hi everyone,

First time out on a new pair of skis this weekend, and I put a gouge in the base of one ski, about 2'' long, maybe 1-2mm deep (still all black, so I don't think I went through the base to the core). I don't race, but don't want this to affect my skiing, or damage the ski more. Should I repair it right away, or is it no big deal? Whats the cost of a typical repair like this?

Thanks.
post #2 of 18
Can you post a pic of the damage?
It would make life easier for us if we could see the damage before we comment on what to do.

Mike
post #3 of 18
First off, I'd say that you could probably just leave this scratch alone. If it's running up and down your base, then it won't do any harm. The only thing you'll really need to do here is to trim down any material that may be sticking above your base.

If you'd like to fix it, go for it. This is an easy repair. You'll need a P-tex candle and a metal scraper. First, clean out the gouge with some dish soap and water; rinse well and dry.

Next light the P-tex until the tip smolders with a low totally blue flame (use the metal scraper as a heat regulator - if the flame turns yellow, roll the candle on the scraper until it goes back to blue. If you drip yellow-flamed P-tex into the gouge, it will crack and fall out).

Now, drip P-tex into the scratch until you're sure there's enough in there that after it cools, it will be above your base. Let it cool overnight.

With the metal scraper, slowly start removing extra P-tex by scraping the area like you scrape off wax with your plastic scraper. Don't rush this, or you could pull out the entire repair. Make sure you've gotten it flat (you can even use a fine-grit sand paper at the end to give the repair some structure, but use a light hand so you don't create a concave divot).

Now, wax and scrape and go skiing!
post #4 of 18
Thread Starter 
I am at work right now, but can take pictures when I get home. This seems like an easy repair... other than watching flame color, is it easy to screw something up beyond repair?
post #5 of 18
unless you set your skis on fire or go nuts with a scraper and take your base off, this is a very hard repair to screw up that bad. you may not do the best p-tex job, but it shouldn't cause much damage.

Keep in mind that melted p-tex does not hold wax the same as base material, so only do this if it's that bad.

One more thing, don't drip molten p-tex on your hand. It burns and then you have plastic melted to your hand to try and pull off. Not fun, i've done it a few times.
post #6 of 18
Thread Starter 
OK, well I'll take a few pics when I get home and upload them to show you all.
post #7 of 18
Don't worry about it, spend the pic posting energy on cleaning out the repair area.
post #8 of 18
Thread Starter 
If I were to do this, what kind of metal scrapper do I need, and do I hold the upper edge (where my hands are holding it) closer to me and pull across the ptex, or do I push at it, with more of an aggressive angle?
post #9 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by zeppman View Post
If I were to do this, what kind of metal scrapper do I need,
Sharp, flat, steel, no other criterion. It can double as a flame control/drip control tool as you're dripping it on.

Quote:
and do I hold the upper edge (where my hands are holding it) closer to me and pull across the ptex, or do I push at it, with more of an aggressive angle?
It is easier to learn to pull. Take small, small, small scrapes off at first, with a light pressure and an almost vertical scraper. Don't try to do it all in one scrape, it won't work.

Pushing at an 'agressive' angle will tend to chisel the entire repair out, can gouge the base.
post #10 of 18
Thread Starter 


Here is a picture of it.

Edit: OK, that didn't work, how do I add a picture?
post #11 of 18
Thread Starter 
Well I tried filling the scratch, and it worked fine until I tried to scrape it out, and I think I scraped part of the filling out. so I filled it again, and will wait overnight for it to dry.
post #12 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by zeppman View Post
Well I tried filling the scratch, and it worked fine until I tried to scrape it out, and I think I scraped part of the filling out. so I filled it again, and will wait overnight for it to dry.
Was the flame blue or orange? Orange := carbon and soot deposits.

(Trivia factoid: you can't have a candle flame that gives off light without soot)

For best results get the flame very close to the base, like within 3-4mm and let the blue flame kinda fall down the melt column onto the base. What you wrote happens a lot if the base itself isn't very warm.

You might want to hold your breath doing this; exhalation makes orange, guttering flame.
post #13 of 18
Thread Starter 
Yes, I've heard the thing about the blue flame. I did my best to keep it blue, but the candle itself wouldn't really stay lit that well.
post #14 of 18
You can help it stay lit by

- protecting the flame from cold air by keeping the metal scraper near it with your other hand

- shaping the melt blob with the scraper into a tapering cone shape instead of a round blob.
post #15 of 18
It will take some time to get it perfect. Letting it cool oveernight was a good idea though
post #16 of 18
post #17 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alpinord View Post
Yep, way better! (But I didn't want to get into this and intimidate the poor gentleman).
post #18 of 18
Thread Starter 
Hey thanks guys. I like the soldering idea, maybe I will try that next time. Letting it dry over night helped. I scraped it the next day and it looks really good. Not perfect, but good enough. Thanks for the help.
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