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Damaging my topsheets while skiing

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
I got a pair of Volkl Gotamas this year and just got back from a 3 day trip to Squaw where I used them for the first time. Loved the skis! However, I've noticed that there's quite a bit of damage on the upper inside corner of each ski. The part where the topsheet meets the sidewall. Seeing damage like this isn't new to me, but seeing the amount done in just 3 days was surprising, especially since I didn't have any major falls or have very sharp edges.

On the 2nd and 3rd days I paid attention to my ski placement more and realized that when skiing off-piste terrain the skis will often make contact when I'm regaining my balance/control after getting thrown out of a turn (first pair of skis this wide ) or coming over an unexpected bump. I could usually hear them hitting.

I'm not sure if something has changed in my skiing, the skis are just really fragile, or I'm too weak to handle them well this early in the season. Is it also possible that there's too much play in my boots and my skis are getting thrown around too easily?

The skis are 183" and I'm 5'11". I've been skiing & racing for years and would consider myself to have solid form, at least on-piste.

Thoughts? Thanks!
post #2 of 15
Volkl race skis have been known to delaminate quite easily. Ive seen it myself. I dont think that anything is wrong with your off pist skiing but just as in racing, skis and gear in general take a lot of abuse. Its kind of part of the trade. Its a tricky situation.
post #3 of 15
Clicking skis on the fronts usually means you are in the back seat a bit.
post #4 of 15
Your tips hitting could mean you have them tipped to the inside edges. Check your boot alignment, especially canting and cuff angle. Are you knock-kneed?
post #5 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pierre View Post
Clicking skis on the fronts usually means you are in the back seat a bit.
Certainly possible since I don't have a ton of experience off-piste. Been focusing on staying forward more and really driving through turns like I would on a groomer but usually get thrown in the back seat by crud or bumps. Going to Salt Lake City this weekend and will bring back some videos that should help.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post
Your tips hitting could mean you have them tipped to the inside edges. Check your boot alignment, especially canting and cuff angle. Are you knock-kneed?
Don't know a whole lot about boots but I'll take a look. I'm not knock-kneed and when I sit on the left my tips definitely spread further than my heels if I fully relax my legs. Would the opposite be true if there was some alignment issue?
post #6 of 15
Garret,
As you pointed out this isn't new, it's just happening more on the wider skis. So IMO if you use the same stance you would on the narrower skis, the wider skis would naturally have less space between them. So try opening your stance a bit.
post #7 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by tdk6 View Post
Volkl race skis have been known to delaminate quite easily. Ive seen it myself. I dont think that anything is wrong with your off pist skiing but just as in racing, skis and gear in general take a lot of abuse. Its kind of part of the trade. Its a tricky situation.
I have a pair of '08 Volkl Bridges that are delaminating in a bad way. It may very well be a Volkl quality problem more than your technique.
post #8 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by garret View Post

Don't know a whole lot about boots but I'll take a look. I'm not knock-kneed and when I sit on the left my tips definitely spread further than my heels if I fully relax my legs. Would the opposite be true if there was some alignment issue?
Nothing to do with which way your toes point when sitting on the lift, just whether the big toe side or little toe side of your foot is lower when standing in boots on skis in soft snow.
post #9 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post
Nothing to do with which way your toes point when sitting on the lift, just whether the big toe side or little toe side of your foot is lower when standing in boots on skis in soft snow.
Ah I see now. Well I'll focus on the width of my stance this weekend and see how things go. Thanks guys!
post #10 of 15
garett,

I have seen the top sheets of Volkl chip just below the shovel and that usually leads to delamination in time. Get an epoxy patch in those areas or see your shop about replacement if the skis are new this season.

What is causing the chipping is you are starting your new turn before you are flattening both skis. Your new outside ski tip is clicking against the old outside ski as you start turning.

RW
post #11 of 15
or if you're skiing in europe just standing on a liftline will equate to scuffed topsheets and an edge tune after roughly 5 minutes

honestly...they ruin the whole RFID gate entry into lifts by not having a proper corral....if only the world was perfect...
post #12 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by garret View Post
I didn't have any major falls ......I've been skiing & racing for years and would consider myself to have solid form, at least on-piste.

Thoughts? Thanks!
My thoughts.....you ski on the bottoms, not the tops. If you call yourself a solid ex-racer, and are having fun, don't worry.
post #13 of 15
What newfydog said.
post #14 of 15
Thread Starter 
I focused on having a wider stance while in SLC this past weekend and noticed that it helped a bit. It seems that my downhill ski's tip was swinging up to hit the other ski when turning on smaller bumps. On my older racing skis the shovel of the ski would still be making contact with the ground due to the sidecut. I'll just have to remember to stay a little wider or not turn with the middle of my ski on bumps. I guess the grip will be better if I'm turning in a depression anyway...
post #15 of 15
My volkl p30's do not seem to have a very strong top sheet layer, they easily get dorked up if you hit them with the poles, they have marks all over them from other people using them and knocking the snow off on the lifts with the sharp end of the poles. (borrowing them from friend) I notice that they will easily skuff if you get the tips on top of eachother.
The other volkl ski's i have seen, i wish i could tell you type/number, seem to be holding up really well. Granted, the p30's are a bit older then the other pairs. And a different price range. 700 (p30s) vs 1100.
It's sad to see stuff like that, but remember, it's just aesthetics, unless your literally pealing it off cause the end of the ski is just to sharp.
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