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Posture breakthrough - have I got this right?

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 
Got to the hill today (Saddleback, Maine). Beautiful pow/packed pow conditions. Was full of hope for a great day, until I took my first run. Could not put two good turns together. Off balance, turning shoulder into the hill, bail out traverses, the works. The worse it got, the "harder" I tried to salvage the run. First couple runs were on a trail that has a pretty steep first pitch that is always all ice. First two times down were ugly (see above). One thing that I had been doing was looking at my skis to check my stance. And that seemed to be the problem. The third time down, I concentrated on standing tall, and consciously not looking at my skis. Voila! Made some very nice quick scarving turns on the ice and down the pitch. This revelation changed my day. I focused on standing up. And the drill was to concentrate on never looking at my skis. Again, felt a great sense of balance. Really had the sensation that all the business was happening in my feet. And when I lowered my center of grav for a steep pitch or bumps, I concentrated on keeping the same vertical axis, where before I would tend to crouch, roll shoulders over and get too far forward. It was a new sensation not looking at the boards. Required a certain amout of "trust" that they would be where they needed to be without me looking at them, with all of the balance issues that causes. ANd they were.
So have I got the right idea. Certainly felt right, and turned around quite a frustrating start to the day. What drills, tips or hints can you suggest for this posture issue? Again, I focused on not looking at the skis, and concentrated on the terrain 20' or so ahead of me. Appreciate the repleis.
David
post #2 of 21
Sounds good to me. Maybe try and find a reference point that you can focus on when standing tall to help you stay there like your shins touching the tongue of the boot.------Wigs
post #3 of 21
deliberate1,

Sounds good to me. I always tell skiers to "stand up and ski".


Quote:
What drills, tips or hints can you suggest for this posture issue?
You balance better when there is some activity in your skiing. Then you are actively balancing. I use stepping from ski to ski while traversing between turns as a active balancing drill. Shuffling the feet as you turn is also another active balancing drill. A vertical side slip (feet following a straight line down the fall line) is also another drill that tests if you are balanced in the middle of the ski.
Thousand steps is an excellent drill for balanced edging movements.

RW
post #4 of 21
I think the real issue is that when you're not tall, you're either in a position that puts the weight on the wrong part of the skis or in a position that locks out proper movements. Of course, standing tall is a self-limiting position. You need to be fluid with good flexion, angulation, and counter, not straight and tall, when those movements are beneficial.

You might go back to basics and try the poor position to determine just what is going wrong. Once you find the cause of your problem, you can remind yourself what's happening and why so you can correct your movements from the beginning.

If you do any drills, like the thousand steps or others, do them a LOT. Do them until you get so bored that you're thinking of other things...you'll find that you've developed the movements to the point where the balancing is automatic. Now, continue the drills with a gradual change of movements into your skiing. Just doing a few minutes of drills won't help, even if it is the right drill for you. Doing the drills all day without morphing those movements into your skiing won't help much, either.
post #5 of 21
Want a quick check on where your pelvis should be? Try herringboning up a slight grade and note where it goes in relation to your feet.
post #6 of 21
Project your gaze, body, and intentions down the hill where you want to go. The skis are where you are "now", but you want to focus your attention and direction on where your skis will be. Kind of like skiing into the future.

I think the projection of your skiing into the future is heavily dependent on the terrain and the size/shape of turns you are making. You may look very far ahead for high speed GS turns, or only look 1-2 bumps ahead when skiing moguls. You get the idea.
post #7 of 21
Thread Starter 
Great suggestions all. What is the "thousand steps" drill.
And Skier219, your comment about "skiing into the future," that is what I seem to think about most of the day. Rather an elegant image, that one.Thanks for that.
David
post #8 of 21
Thousand steps is where you make linked S turns on an easy slope steppin all the time all the way through every turn. Never slide on both skis at the same time except during the instant you're changing feet in the steps. Vary the time each foot is in the air. Do this for so long that you get bored and you're thinking of something else...your balance will have become automatic by this point.
post #9 of 21
d1,

1000 steps is where you can tiny steps continuously throughout every turn. Also try 1000 shuffles, where you shuffle your feet back and forth continuously all the way through your turns.

Skiing into the future requires a flux capacitor.
post #10 of 21
Please note, that your steps ought to leave herring-bone tracks -- don't just lift the feet, you lift and step into the turn.
post #11 of 21
Stop it rusty, you are going to disrupt the space-time continuum!
post #12 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kneale Brownson View Post
Want a quick check on where your pelvis should be? Try herringboning up a slight grade and note where it goes in relation to your feet.
I like that!----Wigs
post #13 of 21
If you like that, try doing it backwards!
post #14 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by therusty View Post
If you like that, try doing it backwards!
My insurance people don't approve of that.
post #15 of 21
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wigs View Post
My insurance people don't approve of that.
Wigs, as you were kind enough to reply to my post, as an attorney who represents injured workers, it would be my pleasure to help you through the insurance process - in Aspen, of course.
David
post #16 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by deliberate1 View Post
Wigs, as you were kind enough to reply to my post, as an attorney who represents injured workers, it would be my pleasure to help you through the insurance process - in Aspen, of course.
David
Thanks but one of my jobs is to try and stay healthy.----Wigs
post #17 of 21
And speaking of Aspen...

In "Thousand Steps," each step should begin by moving your inside ski tip into the turn, creating the letter "V" with your skis as you look down. Do not step the tail of the outside ski out, which would create the letter "A."

Remember: "V" as in "Vail," never "A"...as in "Aspen."



Best regards,
Bob
post #18 of 21
Then again--you're right--you shouldn't be looking down at your skis in the first place! But the V's and A's thing still holds.

Best regards,
Bob
post #19 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by deliberate1 View Post
Great suggestions all. What is the "thousand steps" drill.
And Skier219, your comment about "skiing into the future," that is what I seem to think about most of the day. Rather an elegant image, that one.Thanks for that.
David
David,

Lito gives a textbook demo of thousand steps in breakthrough on skis one which if I recall correctly you have in your library.....I think my italian friends might have a demo in one of the lvls in the link below too...but no time to review....off to bed.

can't do it for you now, 1st chair tomorrow at wa.....

Hunt around the csia alberta website too, might be a demo there too.....

All of the demos Lito does in breakthrough one are still relevant, despite what you might hear....

The focus of course remains on balance....

post #20 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Barnes View Post
And speaking of Aspen...

In "Thousand Steps," each step should begin by moving your inside ski tip into the turn, creating the letter "V" with your skis as you look down. Do not step the tail of the outside ski out, which would create the letter "A."

Remember: "V" as in "Vail," never "A"...as in "Aspen."



Best regards,
Bob
Hohohoho, good one bob. But one thing will never change, A comes before V. Wigs
post #21 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Barnes View Post
And speaking of Aspen...

In "Thousand Steps," each step should begin by moving your inside ski tip into the turn, creating the letter "V" with your skis as you look down. Do not step the tail of the outside ski out, which would create the letter "A."

Remember: "V" as in "Vail," never "A"...as in "Aspen."



Best regards,
Bob
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wigs View Post
Hohohoho, good one bob. But one thing will never change, A comes before V. Wigs
Is this what you were discussing while my eyes glazed over?


I wish I had a nickel for every time I heart the phrase, "So, Bob......"
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