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Exercises For Level 6 Skier

post #1 of 24
Thread Starter 
I am a 34 old, 185lbs, solid level 6 skier. You can see my last run from 2008 at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nBHk91wo-Rk
This year, I got new boots, Fischer MX9, which are great. I skied few times in new boots and have found that I feel more comfortable skiing soft bumps.
I wonder if anyone can recommend exercises that will help me to take my skiing to next level?
post #2 of 24
Realy nice skiing. I think your better then you think you are. Just need to start adding some dynamics (controlled edging, a bit more seperation ) you sure looked comfortable with what you are doing.Maybe a day clinic (ask Bob Barnes he seems to be one smart dude)
post #3 of 24
Thread Starter 
To be honest, I am scared of bumps. I can do the first 3-4 and then I get this feeling that I fly like a bullet and will break my legs soon. And that's when I chicken out and ski across the next bump
Or maybe the icy East conditions are not the best to learn skills needed to go to next level?
Thanks OB
post #4 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by jacpol View Post
To be honest, I am scared of bumps. I can do the first 3-4 and then I get this feeling that I fly like a bullet and will break my legs soon. And that's when I chicken out and ski across the next bump
Or maybe the icy East conditions are not the best to learn skills needed to go to next level?
Thanks OB










post #5 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by jacpol View Post
I wonder if anyone can recommend exercises that will help me to take my skiing to next level?
An exercise that would help you in your turns would be to begin with carved traverses to a stop, beginning with your skis pointed at an angle downhill and then ride your carving edges in an arc across the hill (beware of oncoming skiers or boarders) to a stop. Once you feel comfortable riding your uphill ski edges across without side slipping then begin to release your edges in the traverse by tipping the skis to a flat ski momentarily and then back to the uphill edges. Focus on moving your skis to flat by moving your downhill knee towards its little toe side. The uphill knee will usually follow. Once you can do this smoothly increase the tipping past the flat ski to the downhill edges and then back to the uphill edges. Do this while feeling the pressure of your foot move from one side of the boot to the whole sole and then the other side of the boot. Develop patience in doing these traverses so that you can do the edge release and re-engagement smoothly and confidently. You can then begin to continue the release and new downhill edge engagement into a new turn downhill allowing your skis to carve towards the fall line.
This exercise will create patience with a smooth release of your old edges and use of your new edges to create edging before the fall line.
post #6 of 24
I am about your level, maybe not quite as good.

Have a look at this!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vlzIkIQa3e0
post #7 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hokoyo View Post
I am about your level, maybe not quite as good.

Have a look at this!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vlzIkIQa3e0
austria, not australia.

and if that's you, may i kindly ask for a discount for your DVD?
post #8 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by perpdartNY View Post
austria, not australia.

and if that's you, may i kindly ask for a discount for your DVD?
Ha ha!! I wish i had 1% of his talent
post #9 of 24
Jac,

A couple of things kill anyone in bumps:
--weight back on their heels
--rotating their outside around toward the hill
--feet apart

Look at your video at about 18 and 19 seconds. Are your feet in front of your body? You need to have your feet under your body, which feels like they are behind you. If your feet are in front of your body, strongly pull your inside foot back all the time every turn to get balanced over your skis. (I know, someone will say that this is wrong; you need to get your hips over your feet and you need you toes, knees, and nose lined up. Exactly how does one accomplish those and how does one tell when things are lined up???) When the snow drops away from your skis in bumps or elsewhere, pull both feet strongly back to bring your ski tips down to the snow. Rule of thumb--if your ski tips aren't on the snow, you have no control. You need the forward-inside edge of your outside ski working in the snow immediately after the turn transition.

In your video you reach forward with the outside pole for a plant and bring your outside shoulder forward. For a "strong inside half" you want your outside pole/hand/arm/shoulder back (way back) and low--way low reaching way down the hill. Especially in bumps, have the pole ready to plant before your skis reach the fall line and never bring the outside pole/hand/arm/shoulder forward past the fall line. You want your inside pole/hand/arm/shoulder to be high and forward with the inside hand almost over the inside ski tip.

Your stance width is OK, never wider especially in bumps, and more weight on the outside foot than the inside. Learn retraction/absorption turns where you flex the legs to absorb the bumps and extend on the downslope of the bump. These turns also work excellently on smooth runs and are quicker than the typical extension turns, as well as easier on knees & quads. Try loosening the top buckle on your boot cuffs and loosening the power strap. Allow the skis to move under you without throwing you around. Experiment with how loose works for you without loss of control.
post #10 of 24
patience patience...

watch you feet in the video, they do 90% fo their movement in just before/after the skis are in the falline

this suggests either: you learned when skis long, skinny and straight, and/or, you are not quite comfortable with the acceleration that happens when both skis are largely pointing downhill.

start with the fanned traverse exercises suggested by gcarlson

then move on to work on turn shape, more "S" and less "Z". the roundness of good turns shows in short, medium and long radius turns..
post #11 of 24
Thread Starter 
I am rather uncomfortable when I ski to fast. On icy trails of the East Coast, picking speed is not fun. When I feel that I go to fast, I rather focuse on a place where to turn/stop than technical elements of a turn.
What do you mean I do 90% of movement with feet? How else shall make a turn with my hip? Of course I agree that I shall use my knees more.
post #12 of 24
Jac,

Hmm - it looks like nothing has changed since the last thread. In fact, the videos look identical. Hmm - last time I recommended the carved traverses. It seems like Gary and Doc agree. That drill will be your first step towards the next level. Doc has nailed the "z" turns.

Has anyone else noticed the wedge at the beginning of Jac's turns? Getting to the next level means getting rid of that crutch. It's not going to be easy. There are dozens of drills that can help get you there. Railroad tracks and what I call Flamingo turns (lift the new inside ski so that the ski tip is pressed into the snow and tilted onto the new edge when starting a turn - someone else has a ghostly name for them). You can try to do these drills on your own, but you're at a level where a lesson can really speed up the progress because there is way too much to explain online, it's too easy to not do the drills right and you probably have a lot of muscle memory for your current movements. Your ultimate goal here is to initiate turns with a "fore-agonal" movement of the center of your body into the inside of the new turn instead of using the wedge, an up move and upper body turning.

I suspect that the line you're taking in the bumps matches the type of turns we see here. Until you can make rounder and shorter radius turns, you'll find it easier to take a more meandering line through the bumps. In the meantime, here are two drills that will help expand your bump prowess:
-Shock absorbers - Traverse across the mogul field keeping your waist to your head at the same height off the snow by using your legs as shock absorbers. Focus on pushing down on the backside of the bumps to maintain ski to snow contact.
- Twisters - Climb up to the top of a bump so that your tips and tails are off the snow. Notice how easily your skis can twist back and forth. Twist the skis so that you slip onto the backside of a bump and can approach the next bump from the side.
post #13 of 24
Thread Starter 
Hi Rusty
Thanks for your feedback.
The video is in fact from the last year, and I believe some things have changed, I have new boots and I feel them much better. I don't have videos from this year yet, but I hope that once I will shot a latest video you will be able to see difference.
When it comes to short runs- trust me I can do them pretty well and and they are much narrower than ones you see on the video.
post #14 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by jacpol View Post
I rather focuse on a place where to turn/stop than technical elements of a turn
Here's the thing. You should always be turning. So you are not doing it in one place. If somebody were to follow you around witha flexible yardstick, you'd want them to have to bend it to place it in your tracks no matter where they try to place it.
post #15 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post
Here's the thing. You should always be turning. So you are not doing it in one place. If somebody were to follow you around witha flexible yardstick, you'd want them to have to bend it to place it in your tracks no matter where they try to place it.
Where's the fun in that?
post #16 of 24

form

Quote:
Originally Posted by jacpol View Post
I am rather uncomfortable when I ski to fast. On icy trails of the East Coast, picking speed is not fun. When I feel that I go to fast, I rather focuse on a place where to turn/stop than technical elements of a turn.
What do you mean I do 90% of movement with feet? How else shall make a turn with my hip? Of course I agree that I shall use my knees more.

you look lame . but no worries , i think you know that which is why your here !

my friend , look at how your riding your tails in that video . your form is all off , why are you using pole plants on that trail?

you need to drive your boots , i didnt see you flex em once. your hands are all dropped down . no good dude. you should look like a linebacker charging , like your driving a bus.

here check this form out and then compare it to your own.

if your scared in the east its because your edges arent sharp enough. digh those edges in and drive your turns hard! it doesnt have to be fast but by all means learn to ski your edges.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NpleOZtz8aY

i hope you dont feel i was too harsh with you , your not that bad but you do look like your 60 with the way you twist your turns . you need to ley em flat kinda while turning . its hard to explain but if you did it right you would feel it connect so much better and you would feel way more in control.

just seriously compare your vid to the one i posted for you to watch
post #17 of 24
Thread Starter 
Dear Watchunglava
When I read your message, I concluded that if you would not post it at all that alone may make me a better skier one day. The only positive thing that I can pull from your sentences is your link- let's end with that.
post #18 of 24
i think your more than a level six. thats some pretty decent skiing
post #19 of 24

chill guy

lets leave it at this , i skied a foot and half of fresh today !!!!! so whats up with th@

you sound pissed or something dude. you cool?

your turns look lame sorry man . your the one who put yourself out there , i just gave you honest critisism and advise.

glad at least that you watched the video. that guy rips right?

you do not look like that so chill out man . maybe you rip i dont know im just judging what you put out there.

little advise, if you can't handle the truth , don't ask for it. hope to see you around sometime , maybe you can make me eat my words. but by all means dude dont get all bent out of shape i had the bestkind hearted intentions .
post #20 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by skibum185 View Post
i think your more than a level six. thats some pretty decent skiing
I would say a six, seven is skiing very well on blues.
post #21 of 24
Thread Starter 
Skiing on blues is not a problem at all. I tend to ski on black trails. Last week I skied soft bumps on blue trails. I also practiced cowbay turns- I hope that it will help in long run.
post #22 of 24
Just clarifying docbrad66's earlier post, the 90% comment was (I believe) that your feet -- and therefore your skis -- are moving from \\ to // quickly. I tend to do this too, and it can lead to abrupt moves, like a slight pop up, in an effort to get the skis quickly "over" to the new edge. Instead of \\ to // think of going \\ to || to //, spending more time in the fall line. This may be difficult at first, because you'll pick up speed in the fall line, but the idea is to shape the top of the turn as well as the bottom. Or as epic said "always be turning"

There's something going on with turns to the left, too -- the skis get close together and diverge momentarily. Anyone else see this?

Bill
post #23 of 24
jacpol, do you know what the falline is? It's basically a line straight down the hill. In most turns, when a person's skis are in the falline (pointing straight down the hill) half the direction change of their turn is done. The half of the turn above the falline is where speed is gained, and the bottom half is where speed is lost.

Right now you're rushing the top half of the turn, to avoid the speed gain, and lingering in the bottom half. You need to become friends with the top half of the turn, and learn to enjoy the speed gain. You'll still have the bottom half of the turn to bleed off as much speed as you want.

It's like riding a roller coaster. You get the WHEEEEE on the way down (the top half of the turn), and get to catch your breath again on the way back up (the bottom of the turn). It's one of the great joys of skiing, and it adds a fluidity to your turns that is very pleasant.

On a flat groomer, make some turns in which you lengthen out the top half of the turn, and shorten the bottom. As you start your turn begin a slow count (one thousand 1, one thousand 2, etc). Reach the falline on one thousand 3 or 4, then do the bottom half of the turn more quickly, finishing your turn with your skis pointing 90 degrees to the falline. Repeat, repeat, repeat.

You'll quickly become comfortable with the top half of your turns, and come to enjoy them. Enjoy the soon to be discovered new found smoothness in your skiing.
post #24 of 24
Thread Starter 
T-bar and Rick thanks for your helpful comments- they make a lot of sense. I have this book by Herb Brooks "Any one can be an expert skier 2" , which comes with a dvd. There he shows turn, release/float, turn and I have been practicing this pattern this season in addition cowboy turns and making rounder turns. I have no problem with any of these. I think that I improved this season, if I will have someone with me on slopes, I will shoot a new video and look forward to hear new comments.
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