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How to return the liner into a boot?

post #1 of 32
Thread Starter 
This is probably the dumbest question asked here, but I've never taken the liner out of my boots (only had it done in the store), and I'm wondering what's the correct technique for returning the liner into the boot without harming it after it's already out ?

Since the liner generally has the shape of the boot, I'm not clear how I would put it in correctly without either ruining it or putting it in the wrong shape. . Getting it out seems much simpler since it can change its shape when it's coming out.
post #2 of 32
Kneel on your living room floor (OK, any location really) place the shell in front of you with the toe pointing at you... have the shell unbuckled. Start to 'feed' the toe of the right liner into the right shell, as it starts to slide in place your hand into it with your palm facing up finger tips touching the front of the toe box. Drive your hand down and in to the boot, reaching toward the front (toe area) of the shell. The liner will slide right in. buckle up the shell. Done.
post #3 of 32
Excellent question and, by coincidence, I've just done that with my boots since reading your post (I'm about to go off skiing -- yippee!)

Whiteroom is a pro, but his technique won't work for me (I've just tried it) because I can't get my hand into the liner AND get the liner into the boot. What I do is put the boot on a hard surface, stuff the liner as far as it will go. When it has got that far I take finger and thumb (or, if it is really stiff) both thumbs and crease the liner around the achilles (both sides just above the heel) and press down. Once it goes "round the corner" it uncreases fine.

I'm not a bootfitter but I was shown to do it that way by one. It bends the liners, sure, but they seem to be able to take it.

(You didn't ask, but here, by the way, is how I take liners out of boots. Grip the top rear of the liner firmly with one hand and hold the top of the rear of the boot in the other. Now pull the liner forward towards the tongue of the boot. Once you've done that, start to pull the liner up and round. It should come easily.)

I take the liners out of my boots every night and the footbeds out of the liners. I think that dry boots are absolutely essential to warm feet and warm feet are essential to enjoying your skiing.
post #4 of 32
Thread Starter 
Maybe I'm misunderstanding something. The liner is L shaped, and it's bottom is fairly solid. This is like trying to fit a big L into a slightly bigger L. Which way do I push it? If I shove the toe area straight down, I have no space to turn it 90 degrees...
post #5 of 32
Well, it's easier to show than to describe, but the thing is the inner, although L-shaped, is NOT rigid, so, as you push down on the heel, the sole crumples/flexes so that it goes round the corner. Believe me, it works!
post #6 of 32
Try touching the inside toe area of just the shell of your boot with your hand. How did you do it? If you have your palm facing up and reach into the boot while the toe faces you, then you can use your wrist to 'go around' the L shape of the boot, right? Now try it with your hand in the liner, maybe use the other hand to push down and in at the back of the heel.

The goal is to not just stuff the liner toe straight down into the heel of the boot, use your hand to guide it (and to flex/ bend the liner) through the instep area and into the front of the shell.

hard to explain, relatively easy to do.

Brute force also works, you're not going to break anything.

... a warm shell is MUCH easier to work with.
post #7 of 32
Good explanation Whiteroom, now if I print it and give it to my wife she can dry her own darn boots next time!!
post #8 of 32
Its easy, just shove it in, you wont damage anything.
post #9 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richie-Rich View Post
Its easy, just shove it in, you wont damage anything.
post #10 of 32
And the definition of warm shell is one that has been in a hotel room for a few hours... not out of an oven like me friend learned a few years back. Only a professional should bake shells when making adjustments, and most of them use heat guns and not ovens.
post #11 of 32

put the right into the right and the left into..........well......... you'll figure it out.

post #12 of 32
 hi, no problem. Put the liner on your foot, and put your foot with liner into the boot shell. With racing boots this is sometimes the only way to get your boot on.
post #13 of 32

Make sure the left liner is in the left boot etc.  Learned from trial and error.

post #14 of 32
A great product for relieving you from the tedium of liner out, liner in is the Hotronics Heated Boot Bag. It comes in a variety of sizes and works like a charm. Since I got mine, I won't ski without it.

Your boots go in at night and come out in the morning warm and flexible as well as dry. The feel of putting on a warm boot is exquisite. The shell bends easily around your foot, the liner warms your feet and wraps them in decadent comfort. They come with AC and DC plugs so you can start heating at home and maintain the warmth while you ride to the resort.

The few times I haven't used the bag, since I got it, have been like hell putting on a cold stiff boot.
post #15 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by MastersRacer View Post

A great product for relieving you from the tedium of liner out, liner in is the Hotronics Heated Boot Bag. It comes in a variety of sizes and works like a charm. Since I got mine, I won't ski without it.

Your boots go in at night and come out in the morning warm and flexible as well as dry. The feel of putting on a warm boot is exquisite. The shell bends easily around your foot, the liner warms your feet and wraps them in decadent comfort. They come with AC and DC plugs so you can start heating at home and maintain the warmth while you ride to the resort.

The few times I haven't used the bag, since I got it, have been like hell putting on a cold stiff boot.

*2  Virtually the only way to get into a Dobie 150!!
post #16 of 32
I have found that a great deal of cursing is extremely helpful when putting your liners back in your boots. Beer helps, too. Just make sure you use the beer to lubricate the operator, not the equipment.
post #17 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Per Weum View Post

 hi, no problem. Put the liner on your foot, and put your foot with liner into the boot shell. With racing boots this is sometimes the only way to get your boot on.
That has never worked well for me.  It's easier to get toe of the liner started around the corner and then shove the heel down and the toe forward with my hand as the top of the boot liner yields. 
post #18 of 32
Old Boot,

You're waaay to optimistic today.
post #19 of 32
Yeah it's just like handling your wife...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Richie-Rich View Post

Its easy, just shove it in, you wont damage anything.
post #20 of 32
Hot boots rock until they cool down. You have to remember not to tighten the ever loving piss out of them, because when they cool down they contract into a death grip on your feet.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MastersRacer View Post

A great product for relieving you from the tedium of liner out, liner in is the Hotronics Heated Boot Bag. It comes in a variety of sizes and works like a charm. Since I got mine, I won't ski without it.

Your boots go in at night and come out in the morning warm and flexible as well as dry. The feel of putting on a warm boot is exquisite. The shell bends easily around your foot, the liner warms your feet and wraps them in decadent comfort. They come with AC and DC plugs so you can start heating at home and maintain the warmth while you ride to the resort.

The few times I haven't used the bag, since I got it, have been like hell putting on a cold stiff boot.
post #21 of 32

I avoid over buckling my boots all the time. I'm done with racing so am into day long comfort. I only do the tighten up when I'm in the start gate or facing 45 degrees or more. By that time my boots have cooled anyway.

post #22 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by MastersRacer View Post

A great product for relieving you from the tedium of liner out, liner in is the Hotronics Heated Boot Bag. It comes in a variety of sizes and works like a charm. Since I got mine, I won't ski without it.

Your boots go in at night and come out in the morning warm and flexible as well as dry. The feel of putting on a warm boot is exquisite. The shell bends easily around your foot, the liner warms your feet and wraps them in decadent comfort. They come with AC and DC plugs so you can start heating at home and maintain the warmth while you ride to the resort.

The few times I haven't used the bag, since I got it, have been like hell putting on a cold stiff boot.
This sounds like a great product.

I carry a small compact hair dryer in my boot bag, and use it to warm up the plastic at the insteps of my boots before putting my feet in them at the lodge in the mornings.  Warm plastic bends nicely.  If I take my boots off at lunch, I use the hairdryer again to get the boots softened up so I can put them back on.  When I take the liners out at night, same thing.  It makes getting the liners out and back in so easy.  Soft plastic allows you to put your hand down inside the liner and push it all the way into the boot nice and easy.

I used the hairdryer once with a guy who just had a bad fall and had managed to ski back to the lodge.  He couldn't get his boots off and was in great pain.  I loaned him the hairdryer and he was able to get himself out of those stiff cold boots right away.

Be careful with the hairdryer - it can warm the expensive custom footbed you may have down inside your liner and warp it - I keep the hottest air away from the inside of the liner because of this.
post #23 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by handhdad View Post

Make sure the left liner is in the left boot etc.  Learned from trial and error.

Also make sure the loose bootboard in the bottom of the hard shell is in the proper boot.  Learned this one from trial and error as well.
post #24 of 32
 just guide the toe in (with your hand in the liner if you have too), once the toe is around the corner push in the heel from outside the liner. If it takes you longer than like 3 seconds you are probably doing something wrong.
post #25 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by lluttrell View Post

 just guide the toe in (with your hand in the liner if you have too), once the toe is around the corner push in the heel from outside the liner. If it takes you longer than like 3 seconds you are probably doing something wrong.
With some boots it is very difficult to get the liner back in, and it takes longer than 3 seconds.  I have sprayed the interior of my boots with silicon spray, AND use the hairdryer.  lluttrell is lucky to have a boot whose liner takes only 3 seconds to put back in.
post #26 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by LiquidFeet View Post



With some boots it is very difficult to get the liner back in, and it takes longer than 3 seconds.  I have sprayed the interior of my boots with silicon spray, AND use the hairdryer.  lluttrell is lucky to have a boot whose liner takes only 3 seconds to put back in.
 
If you need to use spray then you are definitely doing something wrong. I have never had a problem with putting the liner in any boot. what kind of boots do you have?
post #27 of 32
Does the liner include a solid cork footbed?
post #28 of 32
I had a similar question a few months back. Found this helpful little video on youtube:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P33PqrOTTFs



Works like a charm for me
post #29 of 32
 

Edited by LiquidFeet - 3/31/10 at 6:38pm
post #30 of 32


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post

Does the liner include a solid cork footbed?

 

 

Yes, I had to take my footbed out to get mine back in. 

I have an instaprint custom insole. 

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