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private ski lessons

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
i'll be going to the poconos with some friends tomorrow and have a question about lessons. i've been skiing twice and taken lessons once out of the two times. i still consider myself to be very new at not afraid to admit that i am bad at it. both times that i've skied, i was on the bunny slope. but this time i really would really like to take it to a different level, by trying one of the more difficult areas. should one take lessons more than once in his/her skiing career? are private lessons significantly different from class lessons? i'm guessing yes, hence the price difference between the two. aforementioned i kind of suck at this, would it be helpful that i take private lessons? or class lessons would be enough? i forgot to tell you that price is a factor for me, but i wouldn't shell out on private lessons, if they are really worth the money. some help would be greatly appreciated.
post #2 of 12
perpdartNY,

Welcome to Epic!

It sounds like you could benefit from another or even a few lessons if you want to be able to handle slopes beyond the bunny slope. Many people prefer private lessons b/c the learning environment is tailored to the individuals needs and learning type rather than to a group of people. The most important factor of any lesson is the instructor and how they are able get the results that each individual needs. If the lesson is 1 1/2 hours and 9 people in it, that allows for 10 minutes for each person for their individual needs, if the instructor gives any individual instruction. A private gives 60 minutes of individual instruction. You do the math.

RW
post #3 of 12
The choice between group and private lessons hinges on the number of other students in a group lesson. If the other students are well matched in their abilities and aspirations and if the group size is reasonable, (5 or less), then a group lesson can be very worthwhile. The problem is that these criteria can't be guaranteed so you take a chance in the quantity and quality of the individual attention which you will receive. That certainty of individual attention is assured when the lesson is one on one with all teaching directed at your ski improvement. You should inquire with the ski school as to the size of the group lessons and the level of the instructors who teach these classes. Then base your decision on your funds available vs. the amount of individual attention which you desire.
And yes, multiple lessons are helpful. Once you feel comfortable with the improvement from a single lesson and have reached a plateau from which you would like to further advance, take another lesson to help you reach a greater skill and confidence level.
post #4 of 12
The other thing is as I said in another post, you have time constraints in a group lesson that may keep the instructor from going down certain roads. You don't want to start something that you can't finish!

I dunno where you are in the Poconos, but if you are going to be at Windham, give Ron a shout. Also, you could try Ned aka Coach (can't remember his last name, but I'm sure they'll know who).
post #5 of 12
Thread Starter 
thank you all for the help.

so, let me make one thing clear. you can request to be put in different levels group classes? how can i determine what level skier i am(obviously low)?

p.s
epic- thanks for the heads up. though unfortunately i will be going to camelback mountain. i would had love to meet ned, i'm sure he is a great instructor. you have anyone to recommend for camelback mountain?
post #6 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by perpdartNY View Post
thank you all for the help.

so, let me make one thing clear. you can request to be put in different levels group classes? how can i determine what level skier i am(obviously low)?

p.s
epic- thanks for the heads up. though unfortunately i will be going to camelback mountain. i would had love to meet ned, i'm sure he is a great instructor. you have anyone to recommend for camelback mountain?
I don't know anyone down there, but I'm sure somebody on here does.

As for the group lessons, the supervisor will "interrogate" you and get an idea of where you should go.
post #7 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by perpdartNY View Post
so, let me make one thing clear. you can request to be put in different levels group classes? how can i determine what level skier i am(obviously low)?
The ski school should have a posted list of the skill levels which you can identify with. The levels go from first time skier through wedge and parallel skiers to ski the entire mountain skiers. You should be able to pick your level using the skill descriptions.
post #8 of 12
Here's a quick reference on lesson levels--
http://www.psia-e.org/ed/
scroll down just a bit for the level descriptions.

If you are successfully skiing the easiest trail, even if you have some defects, you are at least a 3. If you are comfortable on all green circle trails, you're a 4.

You can discuss your skiing with the supervisor at the ski school to confirm your level.

You will get more individualized attention in a private at the cost of more money, usually two to three times that of a group lesson.

One good tip at smaller areas is to sign up for group lessons when it's not very crowded. At small ski areas when it's slow there often are very few people in any lesson over level 1/2 which means you might get private or semi-private attention at the price of a group lesson.
post #9 of 12
Thread Starter 
i feel like a very lucky guy. so, i went yesterday and had lots of fun. i advanced passed the bunny slope this time, but still nothing too much that i can't handle. anyhoo... i paid for a group lesson and got a private lesson instead! perhaps i was there early or maybe it was mid-week? anyway, private lessons are great, i got much more out of it then compared to group lessons. i got to ask many more questions and all. i think the triple the group lessons are well worth it. i progressed from wedge skiing to parallel skiing. i kinda got the hang of it after he taught it to me. but after i sat down for some lunch and tried it again, i kept falling. i need help with that, but i'll save that for another thread.

p.s
do you tip ski instructors? i never knew until we somehow got into a conversation about his job and pay. i tipped him at the end though.
post #10 of 12
Good for you PerpDart!

There have been a number of threads on tipping instructors, including this current one.
post #11 of 12
Good Job. Kept going.


When I first started sking, I remember looking up at racers edge (double Black Diamond) at hunter first time I pulled into the parking lot. I said to myself that I could never ski that.

I also remember looking at racers edge years later when leaving the parking lot and saying holy crap I just skied that!

All The Best!
post #12 of 12
Quote:
When I first started sking, I remember looking up at racers edge (double Black Diamond) at hunter first time I pulled into the parking lot. I said to myself that I could never ski that.

I also remember looking at racers edge years later when leaving the parking lot and saying holy crap I just skied that!
At Heavenly one of the lifts is over Gunbarrel, which is a steep mogul run (black or double black). Its the 1st thing you see and is very intimidating, as I can't ski moguls OR steeps.

One day!
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