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Buying a helmet, suggestions?

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 
I'm going to buy and start using a helmet.
Will I have to buy new goggles? Are there helmets that acommodate regular goggles from Smith, Uvex, etc?
Any suggestions on what kind of helmet to get? The future of the entire human race depends on my brain remaining intact.
post #2 of 23
i have two helmets - both POC's

One is a lighter model (Receptor) which i believe is in-mold technology and has padded ears. It is very comfortable and fits my head well.

The other is a a 'Skull Light' which covers the ears and is a different padding technology - it feels a little more substantial somehow, although they both offer great protection i am told.

My advice it to do a little research and try as many on as possible, since fit and comfort are paramount.
post #3 of 23
determine which still you like-- full, shorty, etc.

try on many.

buy the one that fits the best.

buy it at the store you tried it on.

Larger goggles that aren't newly designed for helmets might gap a teeny bit on the sides but it's no big deal.

Newer goggles are either smaller or the straps may come out a different way so that the straps don't pull the sides of the lens forward with a helmet on. I recommend buying the helmet and then trying it with the goggles you have first. Then worry about whether you need new ones.
post #4 of 23
I think the "try before you buy" is more important for a helmet than any other piece of gear. They are very individualistic in size both in circumference and volume. Add to that the shape issue and a perfect fit for one person might not work at all for another who measure the same with a tape measure.
I personally go with the slightly roomy fit then add a skull cap for average days, balaclava for cold days and slightly loose and breezy for hot days. Ventilation works but it's just one more moving part to deal with. The adjustable headbands help to customize the fit but they can break easily too so don't base you fit on the need for a small plastic ratchet to hold your helmet on snuggly.
post #5 of 23
Thread Starter 
When I go and try on helmets, I'm going to wear my turtle fur hood, and bring my goggles. If I can't find a helmet that fits and allows me to use the goggles I already have, I'll buy new goggles.

Does anyone know which designs offer the most protection? Have there been any destructive tests of helmets for strength?
post #6 of 23
all good advice above. I'd add, being able to change the venting without f'ing with the inserts is a plus. some companies, that make goggles and helmets, have a good interface that helps de-fog and the fit between is cool. also, those companies offer a goggle and helmet combi deal sometimes. regarding strength, this technology is borrowed from bicycle helmets (called one hit helmets) for the most part, and a lot of testing has been done there. I have talked to pros who only use a hardshell type helmet that can take numerous hits, while still offering protection. makes one stop and wonder.
post #7 of 23
A Smith Variant Brim pairs up nicely with Smith Goggles (I got Smith Phenoms cheap off SAC, and they work together well), and it has vent sliders that work with exterior tabs and an adjustable headband (like a bike helmet, with a ratchet in the back). Brim is nice to keep snow off the tops of the goggles.

On the Variant, one complaint used to be that the slider tabs broke off a lot, but I hear they fixed that problem. I still think the slider tabs are a bit fragile, so I move them with care...

As with anything, YMMV, so try stuff on with what you have/what you'd wear to see if it fits the bill and your head...
post #8 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phlogiston View Post
When I go and try on helmets, I'm going to wear my turtle fur hood, and bring my goggles. If I can't find a helmet that fits and allows me to use the goggles I already have, I'll buy new goggles.

Does anyone know which designs offer the most protection? Have there been any destructive tests of helmets for strength?
I almost never wear anything under my helmet, even on the coldest days, like this past week where the temperatures were in the 10F + wind chill range. Of course YMMV. A soft-ear helmet may not be as warm as a full coverage "race" helmet though. FWIW, I love my Uvex Wing Pro S, but as others have pointed out, the best helmet is the one that fits your coconut properly.

I thought, though not sure, that all helmets had to pass Snell and/or ANSI testing.
post #9 of 23
Giro G10.
post #10 of 23
I've never, and have never seen, anyone wear a hat under their helmet. Your face will freeze off well before your ears or head get cold.
post #11 of 23
Leedom Prophet. Comparable to the Giro Fuse but cheaper, with pretty much identical fit.

But try before you buy or make sure about return policies when buying online.
post #12 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by onyxjl View Post
I've never, and have never seen, anyone wear a hat under their helmet. Your face will freeze off well before your ears or head get cold.
UMMH, have you ever seen a balaclava? I wear one on the coldest days and it covers all exposed skin from neck to goggles.
post #13 of 23
I have the Smith Variant Brim also and really like it. Very good fit with Smith goggles and the venting is excellent. I usually wear a light smartwool hat under mine and am comfortable into the single digits.

Mike
post #14 of 23
Get the Giro with the Ipod adaptor & bluetooth. awesome helmet with music!
post #15 of 23
The important for a helmet is the safety.F.I.S says:
Quote:
Crash helmets
The use of crash helmets is compulsory for all events.
Only helmets are permitted whose shell and padding cover the head and
ears. The National Ski Associations are advised to provide their teams
only with crash helmets which satisfy the minimum requirements for the
respective event and which have been certified by recognised institutes.
Helmets with spoilers or edges that stick out are not permitted.
Certain helmets must show a smooth top surface for safety reasons.
Helmets used in FIS Snowsports shall be specifically designed and
manufactured for the respective discipline and shall bear a CE mark and conform to recognized and appropriate standards such as CEE 1077 or US 2040, ASTM F2040, SNELL S98 or RS 98, etc.
Soft ear protections are only allowed for SL events.
I have a helmet Dainese Styger model 2006.Is very nice helmet with standar CEE 1077.
post #16 of 23
I have owned nothing but Giro 9's but just bought a Variant brim. Very comfotable. Also picked up the Smith IO googles. The only thing that I don't like now is when you take your googles off and put them on the helmet, you have to do it above the brim. The googles then have a tendency to slip up and off the helmet. I think that I am going to try and run a line of silicon caulking down the inside of the straps so when dry, it will have a rubberized not slip effect and stay on the helmet. The Oakley crowbars have that elastic/rubber now running on the inside of their straps and they hold much better on the helmet.
post #17 of 23
You'd look Rad in this bad boy:



I started wearing a helmet full time a year and half ago and am now very hesitant to not wear it. It's light, comfortable and warm enough. It does get warm on hot sunny days, but not too bad. The only downside I've encountered recently was a cold draft at the back of my neck. A taller collar cures that.
post #18 of 23
Like everyone says, get the one that fits. If it doesn't fit comfortably, you won't wear it. I've got a fat head (as my wife likes to tell me), and a Giro 9.9 is the perfect fit (XXL - if you want a size like that, you'd best buy early in the season).

As far as a liner or skull cap goes, that's to keep the helmet liner clean. You can wash the skull cap - helmets don't wash too well.
post #19 of 23
regarding balaclavas to use in conjunction with helmet. I use a balaclava that I purchased from the hunting section of a Walmart when I lived in that part of the world. cost $8.00 and is full faced with a mesh like mouth area that keeps warm breath away from goggles and eyes. Didn't find that I needed the full face cover except in extreme cold e.g. Alberta. just got back from Northern Japan where the snow is relentless. Easy to pull down face section when required and then quicly recover face when needed.
We have older giros which have been great, but just purchased a Leedom Prophet for my daughter. Good helmet so I am buying a couple more when they pop up on ebay again. They seem to fit a wide range of head shapes.
post #20 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by craigr View Post
Didn't find that I needed the full face cover except in extreme cold e.g. Alberta.
Yep. As someone who skis extensively in Albert, I have a microfleece balaclava that I put on when the ambient temperature or the windchill drops below -25 C. (-15 F). Above that, my helmet usually keeps my head toasty warm. Once again today I reflected on the wisdom of wearing a helmet when I caught an edge at speed, took a tumble, and rang a bell with my (helmeted) head.
post #21 of 23
If you have a giro head, I'm selling a new omen audio in medium over in the for sale section

But yeah, try before you buy - fit is #1, features #2, looks #3. Hence why I'm selling a helmet that is awesome on features and looks (imho) that I got for a killer price
post #22 of 23
try it on, try it on, try it on - I wholeheartedly endorse that.

My head seems to be longer and narrower than the norm.
I've needed an XXL in some brands to fit length-wise, but then you can fit a gloved hand up both sides at the same time. Way too draughty!

I must have tried over a dozen brands and many more model combinations from cheap & cheerful to "How much!!!???" before I found a fit.

In the end it was a RED rental at Stowe. Unfortunately, I couldn't find one in the store, but ended up with a Giro G10 that fits fine and was a reasonable deal (end of season).

Happy hunting

CW :-)

PS In case you missed the theme of my post, try it on, try it on, try it on.
post #23 of 23
I know it's tough to compare... but I need to replace my Boeri shorty (foam lining is beat up, and I'm also ready for a vented helmet). Anyone able to say how the Smith Variant Brims compare in sizing and head shape fit to the Boeri Shorty?
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