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Recommend a good ski for a Level 5

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
I've recently gotten back into skiing after a 3 year hiatus and am looking to pick up a used set of skiis and boots. According to this scale http://skiing.about.com/od/advancede...skilllevel.htm I would say I'm around a 4 or 5. To be honest I am pretty overwhelmed by the sheer number of skiis available. The vast majority of my time will be spent on crappy hard-packed Ohio groomed snow. Any help is greatly appreciated! I have been looking at the Atomic Highnoon as a good intermediate-level ski - the reviews are saying they are very light weight (is that a good thing? Is that what I need?)
post #2 of 9
Thread Starter 
Forgot to mention, I'd like to keep it under $500 (used) for everything (boots, bindings, skis and mounting/tuning). And I don't care what any of it looks like. Thanks!
post #3 of 9
Thread Starter 
Wow... nobody?

post #4 of 9
I'm pretty much a know nothing around here, but I will say that a light intermediate ski *might* start chattering at high speed or on crud. If there isn't much "stuff" there and the ski isn't designed to be stiff like for a more advanced level, I would guess they might start flapping pretty good under pressure. My impression is that the trick skiers are probably the most concerned about light weight to make their spins easier.
There are a ton of used skis available online, but I'm very wary of buying anything used without seeing it in person. An early season ski swap might have worked well for you. I will say that there are some really good deals on new '08 skis on eBay (I just bought some from snowdealsnow.com and was very pleased), but keeping it under $500 with boots and poles for an intermediate ski might not be feasible. I paid $365 for '08 Fischer Red Heats with bindings, and I think the same seller has some for about $30 less now (but fewer lengths to choose from).

If anybody else responds, they probably know a lot more to me, and listen to them, instead!!
post #5 of 9
$500 for all that is streching it pretty thin. I would shop for boots first and spend as much there as you need to to get something that fits really snug and solid around the ankle. If the boots don't fit the skis won't work right. Any money spent on a boot that is loose and sloppy is money wasted. Don't compromise on a snug fit.

And then buy whatever skis you can afford with the $s that are left. You can often buy used intermediate skis w/ binders for cheap.
post #6 of 9
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Virtus_Probi View Post
I will say that there are some really good deals on new '08 skis on eBay (I just bought some from snowdealsnow.com and was very pleased), but keeping it under $500 with boots and poles for an intermediate ski might not be feasible. I paid $365 for '08 Fischer Red Heats with bindings, and I think the same seller has some for about $30 less now (but fewer lengths to choose from).

So what do you think of the Red Heats? Have you posted a review? They look like a good solution to me but they may be a little wide-waisted for Ohio snow.
post #7 of 9
Go to your local shops and ask about demo skis. Try a few and then buy the ones you like. No sense at all in buying something based on reviews or other unless you have tried it. I heard a shop guy the other day say that "skis are a very personal choice" .. he is certainly right

Mike
post #8 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Slow*Jim View Post
So what do you think of the Red Heats? Have you posted a review? They look like a good solution to me but they may be a little wide-waisted for Ohio snow.
I did post a review here...
http://forums.epicski.com/showthread.php?t=77564 .
There is also a thread here about me sliding the bindings on myself (very easy).
I am very happy with the skis, they were a huge improvement over the 167 starter skis I used for 3 or so seasons. They felt heavy to me at first, but they were nimble on groomers and the weight seemed to help with powering through crud. They weren't suited for moguls, in my opinion, but I don't like to ski moguls. Initiating turns felt effortless despite them being about 10% wider than my old skis.
The biggest change was skiing in ungroomed areas...not super deep, but I was lost in any depth of fresh snow on my old skis. I'm sure the Red Heats wouldn't cut if for real Western powder, but they are much more versatile for the conditions I see than my old skinny-shorts.

BTW, for the first time, I also understand how people can actually turn on ice.
post #9 of 9
try buying nice boots this year and demo skis from your local shop this season. then next season get the ski that fits your needs but dont skimp on your boots. good luck
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