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What's the Protocol? To Help or not? - Page 2

post #31 of 44
Always stop....if your berated....let the parent know how you feel....if you wish and can back it up, if necessary. I usually have a smile on my face.
post #32 of 44
A couple weeks ago a young girl found herself stuck between two ski racks at copper and couldn't get out into the open; she kept sliding backward in a space too narrow to herringbone. I offered my hand and pulled her out to where she could get moving. Her mother thanked me.

Other times I have given a tow to kids who ran out of gravity on the flats and the parents were too far away to help, or retrieved gear from a yard sale for a youngster, or helped get them situated to get their skis back on.

Once I encountered a fallen girl crying. I stopped to see what was wrong. She evidently bruised a leg pretty bad, but didn't seem to break anything. Soon the parents arrived on the scene. I stayed until everyone was satisfied that she wasn't hurt that bad.

I get to help out kids in need several times a season. Each time the parents thank me for the assistance.

If it was my kid who was down and needed a hand, I'd be grateful for any sincerely offered assistance.
post #33 of 44
It's not "protocol"...it's "law".
One of the skier's (in the broadest of terms) code of conduct rules specifically says so (the FIS code of conduct has varying points, usually from 10 to 12)
In an old publication I read :
"At accidents, every skier or snowboarder is duty bound to assist"
The fact that people reacts rudely if one comply to it, "just" because its' "their" children and that because "they can do it alone" show how widespread it's the ignorance of the Skier's code of conduct (and of the basics of "how-to-behave" )
post #34 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nobody View Post
It's not "protocol"...it's "law".
One of the skier's (in the broadest of terms) code of conduct rules specifically says so (the FIS code of conduct has varying points, usually from 10 to 12)
In an old publication I read :
"At accidents, every skier or snowboarder is duty bound to assist"
The fact that people reacts rudely if one comply to it, "just" because its' "their" children and that because "they can do it alone" show how widespread it's the ignorance of the Skier's code of conduct (and of the basics of "how-to-behave" )
Oooooh, really good point. I'd almost forgotten about that. Here's a copy of it. It used to be printed on the back of every lift ticket I bought, but I notice it's not there from any of the 5 resorts I've skied at this year.

FIS CODE OF CONDUCT

The International Ski Federation (FIS) has developed a set of rules governing the conduct of skiers (note that all potentially dangerous skiers are assumed by FIS to be male!)
1. Respect for others. A skier must behave in such a way that he does not endanger or prejudice others.
2. Control of speed and skiing. A skier must ski in control. He must adapt his speed and manner of skiing to his personal ability and to the prevailing conditions of terrain, snow and weather as well as to the density of traffic.
3. Choice of route. A skier coming from behind must choose his route in such a way that he does not endanger skiers ahead. In other words, the skier in front/below always has priority.
4. Overtaking. A skier may overtake another skier above or below and to the right or the left, provided that he leaves enough space for the overtaken skier to make any voluntary or involuntary movement.
5. Entering and starting. A skier entering a marked run or starting again after stopping must look up and down the run to make sure that he can do so without endangering himself or others.
6. Stopping on the piste. Unless absolutely necessary, a skier must avoid stopping on the piste in narrow places or where visibility is restricted. After a fall in such a place, a skier must move clear of the piste as soon as possible.
7. Climbing and descending on foot. Whether climbing or descending on foot, the skier must keep to the side of the piste.
8. Respect for signs and markings. A skier must respect all signs and markings.
9. Assistance. At accidents every skier is duty-bound to assist.
10.Identification. Every skier and witness, whether a responsible party or not, must exchange names and addresses following an accident.
post #35 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by lady_Salina View Post
Oooooh, really good point. I'd almost forgotten about that. Here's a copy of it. It used to be printed on the back of every lift ticket I bought, but I notice it's not there from any of the 5 resorts I've skied at this year.

FIS CODE OF CONDUCT

The International Ski Federation (FIS) has developed a set of rules governing the conduct of skiers (note that all potentially dangerous skiers are assumed by FIS to be male!)
1. Respect for others. A skier must behave in such a way that he does not endanger or prejudice others.
2. Control of speed and skiing. A skier must ski in control. He must adapt his speed and manner of skiing to his personal ability and to the prevailing conditions of terrain, snow and weather as well as to the density of traffic.
3. Choice of route. A skier coming from behind must choose his route in such a way that he does not endanger skiers ahead. In other words, the skier in front/below always has priority.
4. Overtaking. A skier may overtake another skier above or below and to the right or the left, provided that he leaves enough space for the overtaken skier to make any voluntary or involuntary movement.
5. Entering and starting. A skier entering a marked run or starting again after stopping must look up and down the run to make sure that he can do so without endangering himself or others.
6. Stopping on the piste. Unless absolutely necessary, a skier must avoid stopping on the piste in narrow places or where visibility is restricted. After a fall in such a place, a skier must move clear of the piste as soon as possible.
7. Climbing and descending on foot. Whether climbing or descending on foot, the skier must keep to the side of the piste.
8. Respect for signs and markings. A skier must respect all signs and markings.
9. Assistance. At accidents every skier is duty-bound to assist.
10.Identification. Every skier and witness, whether a responsible party or not, must exchange names and addresses following an accident.
post #36 of 44
WWJD? Stop, help & go on His way skiing (Yes, I'm sure Jesus would be a skier, not a snowboarder)
post #37 of 44
My family and I were skiing at Steamboat last week and had a great time. We're pretty conservative and stress a "you can do it, no whining approach". We were nearing the bottom of Rolex and we get a little spread out, our 7 year old is very capable but usually takes up the rear on a black, no problem. My 10 year old was near the bottom, off to the side, resting and eating some snow, waiting. A man stopped and asked if she was ok, she said I'm fine thanks and we appreciated the gesture Long story short and this is an easy one, if you think someone needs help, ask and offer. If you need help graciously accept. If a parent treats you poorly, feel sorry for the kid, unfortunately you can't help them with that.
post #38 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nobody View Post
Yeah, Lady Salina! I like that international code of contact better than our US responsibility code.
post #39 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by dcb31 View Post
I'm in full agreement with this. I have and will continue to slow down or stop and check on anyone who might be hurt, and it doesn't matter what their age is. If someone yells at me for checking on their kid, it will not stop me from doing it again for someone else. It's the right thing to do in any situation.

Would you do it again, for the same kid in a different situation?


(Backstory: I got yelled at by the father, twice, in spite of the kid's rental binding being obviously off and never having been reset properly)
post #40 of 44
You have a point telerod. I've checked and the National Ski Patrol that governs the USA doesn't include it in the basic list on the site. I am actually a displaced Canadian and it is on the Canadian Ski Patrol list. Both here, similar but the point of assisting isn't mentioned on the US code, thought it finishes by stating it is not a complete list.

US Code: http://www.nsp.org/1/nsp/Safety_Info...bilityCode.asp
Your Responsibility Code

Skiing and snowboarding can be enjoyed in many ways. At areas you may see people using alpine skis, snowboards, telemark skis, cross country skis, and other specialized equipment, such as that used by the disabled. Regardless of how you decide to enjoy the slopes, always show courtesy to others and be aware that there are elements of risk in skiing that common sense and personal awareness can help reduce. Observe the code listed below and share with other skiers and riders the responsibility for a great skiing experience.

1. Always stay in control, and be able to stop or avoid other people or objects.
2. People ahead of you have the right of way. It is your responsibility to avoid them.
3. You must not stop where you obstruct a trail, or are not visible from above.
4. Whenever starting downhill or merging into a trail, look uphill and yield to others.
5. Always use devices to help prevent runaway equipment.
6. Observe all posted signs and warnings. Keep off closed trails and out of closed areas.
7. Prior to using any lift, you must have the knowledge and ability to load, ride and unload safely.

Know the code. It's your responsibility.

This is a partial list. Be safety conscious

Canadian Ski patrol list, Point 4: http://www.skipatrol.on.ca/centralzo...13&Itemi d=28
Skier Responsibility Code

(this used to be printed on the back of most resorts lift tickets and this is a new one, i think they used to just use the FIS one)

** KNOW THE CODE. IT'S YOUR RESPONSIBILITY **

Your Alpine Responsibility Code
Skiing can be enjoyed in many ways. At ski areas you may see people using alpine, snowboard, telemark, cross country and other specialized ski equipment, such as that used by disabled or other skiers. Regardless of how you decide to enjoy the slopes, always show courtesy to others and be aware that there are elements of risk in skiing that common sense and personal awareness can help reduce. Observe the code listed below and share with other skiers the responsibility for a great skiing experience.


1. Always stay in control, and be able to stop or avoid other people or objects.

2. People ahead of you have the right of way. It is your responsibility to avoid them.

3. You must not stop where you obstruct a trail, or are not visible from above.

4. Whenever starting downhill or merging into a trail, look uphill and yield to others.
5. If you are involved in or witness a collision or accident, you must remain at the scene and identify yourself to the Ski Patrol.

6. Always use devices to help prevent runaway equipment.

7. Observe all posted signs and warnings.
8. Keep off closed trails and out of closed areas.

9. You must not use lifts or terrain if your ability is impaired through use of alcohol or drugs.
10. You must have sufficient physical dexterity, ability and knowledge to safely load, ride and unload lifts. If in doubt, ask the lift attendant.
post #41 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by comprex View Post
Would you do it again, for the same kid in a different situation?


(Backstory: I got yelled at by the father, twice, in spite of the kid's rental binding being obviously off and never having been reset properly)
I was talking about a situation where someone is potentially hurt. But if I got yelled at for helping a kid reset his/her binding once, I would still do it again for the same kid if it was in a dangerous spot where they shouldn't be standing still.
post #42 of 44
Nice to see so many caring people here. Stopping to help is what separate's us from animals.

I wonder if you'd get the same responses from some other ski forum...

Being an Ambassador at Okemo, I have so many stories about helping kids and parents in all kinds of situations. It's the main reason I volunteer to do the job.

It's "always" the right thing to do.
post #43 of 44
Morrison you're a good man. Or woman. Or whatever.

Yup - checked on a few down people tonight actually myself!
post #44 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by ct55 View Post
Morrison you're a good man. Or woman. Or whatever.

Yup - checked on a few down people tonight actually myself!
That would be Mr. Claystone, thank you. Mrs. Claystone and I have been raising kids for like 30 years. It's hard to not act like a dad around the little ones.
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