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GS + tad of allmountain = ?

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 
Hi,

I'm looking for the best allmountain GS or GS like (long turns basically) ski. I'm 5 feet and 9 inches (175 cm) tall and weigh 165 lbs. My skiing level is 8-8+/10.

What I mean by "best" is sacrificing as little as possoble of the racing characteristics in order to attain more versatility. These are the options that I see:

1) "second best" GS ski, e.g. RC4 RACE RC PRO RF SP 175cm
2) Fischer Progressor 07/08 170cm
3) narrow allmountain ski, e.g. Cool Heat 165/170 cm
4) top cross ski: Head i.XRC 1100 SW RFB or Nordica Speedmachine Mach 3 power Xbi ct 170/177/8 cm (according to World Ski Test http://www.austria-skitest.com/cms/i...gory=9&lang=en and skitest.net http://www.skitest.net/en-cross_carv...kitype-6.shtml)

Please tell me in which of the groups I would get the most for sacrifficing the least. I mostly enjoy high speeds and long turns, but I like trying everything I can in a given resort (I ski in different kinds of places in Europe). That's why I don't want top (non FIS) WC GS skis. I will be using the skis for off-piste sometimes, but I wouldn't like it to be the settling argument against option 1, especially if it would be much better in terms of on-piste performance than all the other. I understand that a ski can't do everything well and would be willing to accept the fact that off-piste would be difficult on them.

Please check if the lengths I chose were correct and tell me what lengths would be correct for the options about which I'm not sure.

Thanks in advance.
post #2 of 21
(2) but go for 175cm

SJ
post #3 of 21
The first thing that popped in to my head reading this was Stockli Stormrider... probably worth a look at the various different models available. Go for wood core (I am pretty sure they tried to throw some ISO cores in about the range)
post #4 of 21
Hi,

I have skied a bunch of skis in this category. It is the "flavor" of ski I like when we haven't seen snow in awhile, but I need something besides an all-out race ski or race carver (basically a race ski with more sidecut). The Race carvers are best on strictly groomed/hardpack snow, but can struggle off-piste unless the conditions are perfect. I am similar to you: 5 foot 9, 155lbs:

Here are some of my favorites:

Fischer Progressor 9+: 170 is kind of a carver length, 175cm is more of the GS ski. A little stiff for my weight.
Dynastar 4x4: don't miss this ski: More versatile than the Progressor, just as good on hard snow. I think the 172 is more stable than the 170 Progressor, and it works better for a lighter skier.
Stockli Stomrider XL: feels like a softer, more forgiving version of a big GS ski. I had a little trouble flexing it.
Fischer Cool Heat: just as stable as the Progressor, a touch more versatile, perhaps a better choice for versatility. It feels just like a wide progressor. Great ski, IMO. Demanding
Head Supershape Magnum: lots of reviews here: very stable, sure-footed, powerful
Nordica Mach 3 Power: really stiff, great hard-snow ski, lacking versatility for the lighter skier
Blizzard Supersonic IQ: I haven't skied it, but sounds very forgiving. Maybe not as race-lite as you are looking for.

On this list, my personal faves are the Dynastar 4x4, Head Magnum, and Fischer Cool Heat. While I loved the Stockli XL, Nordy Mach 3 Power, and Progressor 9+, I found them too stiff, like I was skiing the sidecut, but not really bending the ski unless I was skiing insanely fast. The others allowed me to bend the ski at reasonable speeds, but weren't any less stable. I would argue that the 4x4 is the most stable ski listed here. I picked up a pair of Cool Heat's for my early-season rock skis in 170, although I probably would prefer the 175 for all-mountain use.
post #5 of 21
Also, if you want something still GS'y but a little wider, check out the Elan Magfire 82ti or Xti. Wider, but still a big-turn, high speed GS feel. And, the Nordica Jet Fuel is always a good choice, Stockli XXL, Head iM82 would all be in that category. For the lighter skier, I had the best luck on the 82ti.
post #6 of 21
Have a look at the Head i.Speed (not Supershape Speed), or the Rossignol CX80. The Head Supershape Magnum is a great ski, I've had a pair as my go to ski since last season, but I wouldn't really say it has a GS feel.
post #7 of 21
i have found the blizzard titan (181) to have just the sort of characteristics you are looking for. I can happily ski it like a GS ski but still plenty of versatility in all sorts of terrain. Unfortunately it is no longer a current model but some of thsoe more informed about the current Blizzard line should be able to recommend the equivalent model
post #8 of 21
Seems to me that there quite a few suggestions here that are creeping toward......"all mountain + a tad of GS". The OP asked for the opposite....."GS + a tad of all mountain"

There is a difference.

SJ
post #9 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by spanisharmada View Post
The first thing that popped in to my head reading this was Stockli Stormrider... probably worth a look at the various different models available. Go for wood core (I am pretty sure they tried to throw some ISO cores in about the range)
yeah, before I read your reply, I was: sure, Stockli Stormrider Scott Schmidt (a litlle wider) or XL (75mm)
post #10 of 21
If you like the feel of a recreational GS but don't want a 21m+ turn radius, try the Dynastar Course 67. The 178cm I have has a 17m turn radius (I'm 5'11", 165 lbs). I was going to sell mine since I bought them on a whim and I already had 4 pairs of race stock GS skis for various types of courses and these feel similiar to my shorter race stock Volkls but more turny. I free skied them and ran some NASTAR with them a couple days and decided I really like them and are now thinking of keeping them for harder snow cruiser days. They are easy to turn, fast, and fun. You do however have to use good technique and I wouldn't use them in bumps. They would definately be suitable for rec league racing as well. I put a race tune with 1deg/3deg base/side bevels on them. They probably would be ammenable to a more relaxed style with the factory 1deg/2deg bevels. These skis are more race oriented than some of the other GS like all mountain skis described above and are more consistent with your "GS with a tad of all mountain" requirement. If you wanted to bias more toward all mountain and a little slower speeds, you might want to consider the 172cm. You can get good deals on new ones a couple years old online. Dynastar hasn't changed the design in 4 years or so, a testament to the design. They have recieved great reviews the last couple years also.
post #11 of 21
Just noticed this thread. I have skied on laminated race stock GS ski for years {30+}, and have a couple of pairs of 188's {Fischer and Nordica}. With my son now on a 195, that's a bit much for my free skiing, so I haven't picked up any hand me down's for 3+ years. About 5 years ago I bought my first pair of Stormrider XL's {the red, white and blue flames, with the three layers of metal} in a 184. I also have a pair of the more recent model {brown and orange, less metal}, also in a 184. For me, they are pretty much the perfect ski. I ski in New England, primarily on groomed or "firm" cruisers, but venture anywhere but rock hard bumps. I ski in Eastern crud in them all of the time.

As the world of FIS level GS {and above} has changed, with the equipment evolving to meet that need, I find that today's true race GS ski is rarely a great ski for my free skiing. Coming off Christmas and New Year's, that's even more obvious to me. But with my XL's, I can make nice big GS turns, stable and locked in. They feel like a GS ski to me, and they feel like they ski longer than a 184 {as a GS would for me}. They seem to perform about as well as my GS skis, and let me do a lot more with ease. A tad wider under foot, shorter radius, etc.

I have mine mounted with VIST 10mm risers {not plates}, and Salomon 916's. Very pleased. I also like the way they tune....nice base and edges. Really a top quality ski. I'd try them out, if you can. I think they'd be worth considering. I'm bigger than you (230 lbs), but know people your size who love the ski in a 174 as well. You need to be centered, and the ski will reward you for skiing well.
post #12 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by CanuckInstructor View Post
Have a look at the Head i.Speed (not Supershape Speed), or the Rossignol CX80. The Head Supershape Magnum is a great ski, I've had a pair as my go to ski since last season, but I wouldn't really say it has a GS feel.
The new Supershape Speed, in a longer length, is supposed to be pretty much the i.speed WC with a slightly wider waist. It might work l, although I haven't skied it, only the i.Speed WC, which I can recommend as a top-end race carver. It sucked in crud though: I felt as though I was back skiing in straight skis 15 years ago!
post #13 of 21
Thread Starter 
Thank you very much, you've all been very helpful, especially dawgcatching. I don't have much time today, so I will get back to this thread tomorrow.
post #14 of 21
Thread Starter 
A couple of questiones:

1. Is there anything special about Dynastar Course, or is it just a non FIS GS ski as any other? Is it in the same category as Fischer RC4 WC RC, or rather RC4 RACE RC PRO?

2. Would the Progressor 175 cm (thanks Jim!) be significantly better in bumps than Dynastar Course or something similar?

3. Have any of you tried RADICAL R9X/8X WC OVERSIZE? According to Rossignol's webpage, 9X is available in Canada. CX 80 is not available in Europe, but judging from the sidecut, all the three skis are at least a bit similar. Rossignol's policy seems strange this year.

Unfortunatelly neither Stockli, nor Head is popular here in Poland, so the prices for them are high due to lack of competition, and therefore I won't be buying any of them, unless they are much better than comparable skis from other companies.
post #15 of 21
Quote:
2. Would the Progressor 175 cm (thanks Jim!) be significantly better in bumps than Dynastar Course or something similar?
IMO yes. (Not that any FIS race or even non reg GS are worth much in bumps anyway) The Progressor is a great example of what you are looking for. There are others too but most have the tip/tail taper of race skis. (approx 10mm-12mm of taper) The Progressor has a tip/tail taper of 17mm. Don't get all hung up on the numbers but generally, a greater taper allows you to break off the carve more easily. This makes easier the skidded turns that are necessary in bumps.

SJ
post #16 of 21
The Dynastar course 67 is in the same "cheater gs" category as other companies offerings. It is a softer non-FIS GS with a shorter turn radius.
I wouldn't use these skis in the bumps for two reasons:
1.) If you have a good tune on them they will be too grabby when trying to skid turns
2.) Since they have stiffer metal layers you might bend (deform) them permanately in larger bumps

You can find lots of skis cheap online that would make a good second pair for skiing bumps only.
post #17 of 21
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the clarification.
post #18 of 21
Thread Starter 

Hi again,

 

Haven't bought anything yet and I can get a good deal on Fischer RX9 175cm (06/07). Are they worth considering, and is the length ok for me?

 

Thanks in advance

post #19 of 21

Yes

 

SJ

post #20 of 21

The RX9 is OK, but the Progressor is a big step above in term of performance. I still like the Progressor 9+ for you in 175cm: probably just what you are looking for. A somewhat versatile, powerhouse of a frontside ski that isn't too grabby but gives up very little to the best race carvers.  The RX9 was more of a stiff, all-mountain carver that really wasn't all that impressive: it had a cap construction, not the sidewall, race feel of the Progressor.  I was thinking of mounting up a 175 for myself once my leg can handle it (I thoroughly enjoyed the 170 last year, but it was a little short for big arcs at speed).  

 

The RX9 is probably my least favorite Fischer ski out there, at least as a high-end ride. I never really liked the Big Stix 76's either, and the AMC76 wasn't much to write home about. I think they were all pretty similar in construction.   

post #21 of 21
Thread Starter 

Thanks a lot dawg! Helpful as usual.

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