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Skiing Steeps

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
The person has misread his trail map and has ended up on a double black trail with no other way down.

What is the first bit of advice you could give this person to help them make their way down?

(BTW, I've helped people down trails like this before and once they figure out they didn't die, it opened up a whole new part of the Resort experience)
post #2 of 10
The one thing? You're not going to teach them any new technique on the spot. What you can do is teach them how to look at that slope and break it down into something that (hopefully) they can ski with the skills they have. That's the tactics of skiing. Even the steepest bump run has flat parts all over it, the frontsides of the moguls.
post #3 of 10
Thread Starter 
So, you'd say break the trail down into segments with reference points, and work their way to them using whatever skills they have?
post #4 of 10
I'd want them to be able to find their own reference points and break it down themselves.
post #5 of 10
I will second what epic has said and add the twist of gravity can be your friend even when you think its your enemy.

Don't look down the whole run.
post #6 of 10
How do you eat an elephant?
.
.
.
.
.
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One bite at a time.

I agree. Show them how to break it down into bite size parts. Then eat it one part/turn/piece at a time.
post #7 of 10
I agree with the advice to look where you're going to be next rather than far down the hill. Same idea as one bite at a time. The one thing they NEED TO KNOW is that an edged outside ski will turn to a stop. I've gotten frightened folks down steeper terrain by developing a feel for an uphill christy. Knowing you can finish a turn makes starting one a bit easier.
post #8 of 10
I'm not giving any advice until I find out what their skill level and their mental state is. And the type of double black makes a big difference too. If the penalty for failure is severe injury, the best option may be to stay with them and send someone else to patrol for help.
post #9 of 10
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by therusty View Post
I'm not giving any advice until I find out what their skill level and their mental state is. And the type of double black makes a big difference too. If the penalty for failure is severe injury, the best option may be to stay with them and send someone else to patrol for help.
I don't think it takes very long to acess the situation Rusty. Usually after talking with the person and asking a few questions, it's easy enough to figure out if they're able to try get down with your help, or call for a snowmobile or sled.
post #10 of 10
Assuming they don't need a sled ride, I'd use the approach that Ric Reiter used with me a few years ago: "Can you make one turn down here to me?" I might give them a bit more guidance about where to turn, or let them tell me the path that they think they would take.

It's making it bite-sized, but being a bit more specific about it. One turn. Then, help them make one more. Then one more.
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