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Base burn?

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 
I'm in a waxing frenzy since I'm doing up two new pairs of skis. I got to my new-last-year Rossi B83's. They have a total, since new, of 5 days, (Vail), and I waxed them before summer storage.

I decided to do a few hot scrapes with base prep wax and I'm noticing some dry looking areas in the middle of the bases even after two waxings. What to do? I'm thinking a grind and starting all over. Opinions?

Also, just how serious is base burn? Will a stone grind bring them back?
post #2 of 18
Take some pictures and let us have a look before you go have them ground. It wouldn't hurt to hot scrape with some of your base prep wax to see if those areas improve.
post #3 of 18
Light sanding, stiff brushing or Ski Visions ruby stones & metal scraping/skiving can freshen base structure sections in a pinch.
post #4 of 18
Don't worry. Just keep waxing and skiing. They're just tools to get the job done.
post #5 of 18
Thread Starter 
Dumb question, but how do I go about attaching a picture. I'll do that if someone can help me out.
Thanks!!
post #6 of 18
C.B.,

Go to www.photobucket.com, sign up, and load your pics. Then, select the bottom choice, below the pic...for IMG. Copy that, and post it in your message here at epic.

There are other ways, but thats what I and several others here use.
post #7 of 18
PM me if you need assistance.

Happy New Year.
post #8 of 18
CB

What's your goal? Racing? Or just skiing? If just skiing, wax & go.
post #9 of 18
Thread Starter 

Here's the pic of the base...the "stripes" toward the end are shadows from the window. The area in question is in the running direction. Thanks for the help!!!!
post #10 of 18
A grind would certainly take care of that, but again, it doesn't really hurt anything. They're B3's, so you aren't racing on them. I stick with my first post - wax, ski, and quit worrying.

FWIW, I usually get base work done at the beginning of the season so I'm working with a fresh base each year - or every other...
post #11 of 18
They look pretty good for a freeride ski. I think they just beed a little freshening up.
A bit of time with a brass brush should open up the structure and take care of that.
Then a few cycles with wax and lots of brushing should take care of the rest.
Don't grind them until it's absolutely necessary. They aren't going to be used for racing, and they'll last a lot longer.
JMTCW

Mike
post #12 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by ctskierguy View Post
They look pretty good for a freeride ski. I think they just beed a little freshening up.
A bit of time with a brass brush should open up the structure and take care of that.
Then a few cycles with wax and lots of brushing should take care of the rest.
Don't grind them until it's absolutely necessary. They aren't going to be used for racing, and they'll last a lot longer.
JMTCW

Mike
Yep.

I just worked on a pair that looked just like that. Now they're black & shiny.
post #13 of 18
Do you have a hand sander?

Mount a -white- 6x9 pad

into it and see if that doesn't polish the white base bits out.

If that does it, you're ready to wax with the wax of the day.


Otherwise, go to the brass brush (and possibly grey pad) before hot scraping again.


(BTW, your pic doesn't look like 'burn' aka 'ptex hair fuzzies' so much as small grooves with extra wax loading in them, catching the light, two passes with a horsehair brush would test that notion. The method above corrects either problem.)
post #14 of 18
Maybe I missed something... but just checking... was any brushing done at all? Is it possible that is just excess wax in grooves in the base that the scraper didn't get?
post #15 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Doctor D View Post
Is it possible that is just excess wax in grooves in the base that the scraper didn't get?

+1.

I think there's a good chance the OP put a few minor, inconsequential grooves in the base in that week at Vail. The bases might also have a slight concavity or asymmetrical ripple to them; a true bar would tell.
post #16 of 18
Thread Starter 
Yup...roto-brushed the heck out of them with horse and brass, no joy. It's not wax. I'm thinking that the base may be slightly crowned and the multiple scrapings may have "worn" this pattern into the structure.
I know it isn't a really big deal, but I'm a bit of a bug about my equipment, (this stuff costs lots). Still on the fence on a grind.
Thanks all!!
CB
post #17 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by C.B. View Post
Yup...roto-brushed the heck out of them with horse and brass, no joy.
Ah. Sorry. What's the true bar say?
post #18 of 18
How do they run after waxing? Does it really affect your glide or is it an aesthetic issue?

Base grinds get recommended entirely too much on this site as 'the solution' to all base problems.

A little more abrasive brushing and sanding will take care of the problem if you can live with the fact there will be some minuscule (read you can't feel it while skiing, much less see them) variations in the bases. Followed with some scraping and fiber pad and wax cycles.




Ten minutes with a Ski Visions base flattener and structuring tool, followed by a couple wax cycles and they'll be good as new.



Here's our Bases tips section.
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