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base prep theory question

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
So a week ago I read a post from another member that stated everytime he went to grab a beer he would hit his waxed skis with the iron...and I thought to myself what is the point of scraping between wax applications when doing base prep? If the purpose is to maximize the amount of wax absorbed into the base then why scrape? Why not just iron in wax, let it cool, then hit it again with the iron, repeat 4/5/6/infinity times before scraping and brushing out the base? Is something magical happening during the scraping and brushhng process between coats of wax that would provide greater benefit than just applying wax and reironing a bunch of times before scraping/brushing?

-Z
post #2 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by zohan View Post
So a week ago I read a post from another member that stated everytime he went to grab a beer he would hit his waxed skis with the iron...and I thought to myself what is the point of scraping between wax applications when doing base prep?
Cleaning in general, and ripping off any base hairs that floated up into the wax and got stuck there.

Think of it as the Brazilian for your skis.




newfydog was beyond that, approximately at the mud mask stage.
post #3 of 14
I'm thinking that letting it sit, reheat, sit, reheat a couple times more, then scrape, brush and ski. Repeat once or twice is a very viable and quick way to get fast bases.

Comprex, would that be a Brazilian with or without a landing strip?
post #4 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alpinord View Post
I'm thinking that letting it sit, reheat, sit, reheat a couple times more, then scrape, brush and ski.
I'm no chemist, but wouldn't the repeated heating and cooling of the wax break it down chemically?

Mike
post #5 of 14
I'm not either but it's never stopped me from answering before.

I would guess that as long as you don't burn the wax, you should be able to do this several times. I think it would eventually break down but I think it would take more cycles than you care to do.

Usually if you stay within somethings operating range, you can cycle it several times; antifreeze comes to mind. Water too - heat then freeze. Aside what you loose in evaporation and the rest, it never isn't able to be water again.

Then again I could be completely wrong.
post #6 of 14
I just did exactly what the OP states tonight. I'll let you know how they ski tomorrow!

I just don't see the point in scraping and wasting wax when I can just heat it up again and get more absorbed into the bases.

Mike
post #7 of 14
Yes, The magic is 3 things. As already mentioned, allowing the wax to cool completely and then scraping off, helps to eliminate micro hairs of polyethelyne. Secondly scraping and brushing the base help to "soften" the base grind pattern. A fresh grind is rarely faster then a grind that is gently worn down from waxing, scraping, bushing. and skiing.

The last point in using fresh wax, is that the base material can only absorb so much wax at the temperature and duration that is used with an iron. So the real improvement in speed is not coming from the waxing itself, but from the waxing, cooling, scraping, brushing, and running in of the ski.

So wax as many times as you like, use fresh wax or the same wax over and over again, it will make no difference without giving the base the love that only comes from multiple waxings, scrapes, brush strokes, skiing, and then repeating the process.

You can speed up the wax penetration process with a hot box, however that act is lost without the love shown with brushing and skiing in.

jim
post #8 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by L&AirC View Post
I'm not either but it's never stopped me from answering before.

I would guess that as long as you don't burn the wax, you should be able to do this several times. I think it would eventually break down but I think it would take more cycles than you care to do.

Usually if you stay within somethings operating range, you can cycle it several times; antifreeze comes to mind. Water too - heat then freeze. Aside what you loose in evaporation and the rest, it never isn't able to be water again.

Then again I could be completely wrong.
You are correct.
post #9 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Doctor D View Post
You are correct.
Thanks. Now I have something to show my wife that proves, every now and then, I am right!
post #10 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by L&AirC View Post
Thanks. Now I have something to show my wife that proves, every now and then, I am right!
Pay it forward LMAO
post #11 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by ctskierguy View Post
I'm no chemist, but wouldn't the repeated heating and cooling of the wax break it down chemically?

Mike
If it does (which I doubt), so far the glide is great and this approach is very encouraging and very easy. Definitely include scraping, brushing and skiing as part of the multiple melts process.
post #12 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeC View Post
I just did exactly what the OP states tonight. I'll let you know how they ski tomorrow!


Mike
hows the hangover??
post #13 of 14
Get the Swix Alpine wax manual, which tells all about prepping new skis. $4 and worth every penny. If you can't find it locally try www.tognar.com or 800 299 9904.
post #14 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by skier_j View Post
hows the hangover??
No hangover since I was drinking Yeungling Lager. Can drink a bunch of those without effect so they are my default swilling beer. Can't do the same with a tasty microbrew since they are typically higher in alcohol. Was just tired since I always seem to be doing the ski prep late the night before I head to the hill.

Skis rode well and it saved me a bit of time scraping off and brushing multiple waxings.

Mike
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