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If someone ducks a rope, what would you do? - Page 6

post #151 of 172


No.  People are allowed to ski OB at their own risk.  We would only go after them if we had reports of an incident like an avalanche or an injury where they would be unable to get out by them selves.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post




Would you "Rescue" folks that don't need any rescuing (i.e. they are skiing, not in trouble and not looking for any rescue)?

 



 

post #152 of 172


No.  People are allowed to ski OB at their own risk.  We would only go after them if we had reports of an incident like an avalanche or an injury where they would be unable to get out by them selves.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post




Would you "Rescue" folks that don't need any rescuing (i.e. they are skiing, not in trouble and not looking for any rescue)?

 



 

post #153 of 172

Where I ski,  there are a few ropes that are "soft" closures, and some that a lot more serious.

 

For the soft closures- most are rocky areas, or where you might need to pick up your skis for a 1-3' air. 

 

For the best examples, if you know JHMR, the snag/Wally's slide- only good when the rope is up.

 

Same with the dead tree, in fact I liked how patrol took down the closed signs but left the rope up this year.

 

A little spicier would be something like Foxes, I only ski that when it's snowing or last run, and make sure no ducks are behind me on the traverse.  I am not worried about me, but about people following.  Again when it gets totally filled in, and the rope is down, it is a bump run.

 

I know the guys that run that route for avalanche control and I always joke not to put a bomb on the left side because that is the side I like to ski.

 

Some of my friends are bolder and/or more careless,  saw 4 tourists follow my friends while I watched from below.  My friends were all the way down to me, while the 4 stood at the top debating whether to duck the rope (not a good technique, by the way). Finally when they did go, one guy blew a ski in the rock band and then fell down into the bowl below, ski now on rock above. Hiking to your ski in a closed area, well, obviously poor technique.

 

Now the diving board in Alta Zero, Laramie cliffs, the right of the rope in Dogface, unskiable, Haas/Hourglass, all those are so high profile, or pose high risk of avalanching the general public below, not my cup of tea.

 

All that said, I would accept any punishment given if I were caught behind a rope.

 

So far, 120 days a year for 11 seasons and not even a speeding warning.

 

Lastly, Corbets is ALWAYS best the day before it opens.

 

 

post #154 of 172

Not all ropes are created equal.  I've ducked a lot of ropes... but it was almost always allowed.  Resorts with a lot of tourists have a number of what I like to call "gaper ropes" where a difficult trail is open but it's accessible from a spot that someone who didn't know what they were doing could easily end up on.  For example, at Heavenly the entrance to the North Bowl is located right next to the lift line for Olympic Express... and they typically have it roped off because I'm sure a few people accidentally dropped in without realizing what they were doing.  Breckenridge has a good number of ropes like this as well.

post #155 of 172

Mt. Baker routinely ropes off the entire Pan Dome/Chiken Ridge/Snagglepuss/Chute /Harry Scarey area.  This rope has all kinds of dire warning signs, but it does not say "closed."  They just want to keep the unskilled and/or unaware out of there.  It is regularly patrolled, well used, and completely open to the general public.  However, if you ski far enough down this side of the mountain (or the other side for that matter) you could run into ropes with "closed" signs.  If you pass under these, you may die after falling off a cliff or being buried by an avalanche.  It's happened in the past.

post #156 of 172

Disclaimer: Not a patroller.

Answer:  What would compel me to do anything to anyone skibum?  ...It's their own business.....

post #157 of 172

I'm not a patroller, but if I was and I saw someone on a run that is closed without justification (the situation you described is without justification, IMO), I wouldn't do anything about it.

post #158 of 172

Where I patrol, the approach has changed this season.  Instead of aggressively enforcing the rules, issuing warnings and pulling passes for people who duck ropes, we now let them do it.. But now there's a sign posted at the bottom of every lift stating that if we have to go rescue them in closed terrain, they`ll be invoiced a minimum 250$, and the bill includes patrollers salaries, first aid supplies, hourly rates for vehicles, etc.  When someone gets hurt on an open slope, everything remains totally free as before.

 

We still warn people, but the approach is friendlier.  Besides, our mountain has been extensively blasted with dynamite, so the woods are full of big, square rocks.  Clients going out of bounds encourage the local economy by destroying their skis and snowboards on the rocks and purchasing new equipment.

post #159 of 172

At my hill, the closed runs are closed for a reason.  Even if it's not obvious, there's probably exposed or barely covered snowmaking equipment or something like that.  Patrollers and management want the runs open just as much as you do, so if it's closed, there's a good reason why.

 

With that said, at my hill the policy is that the first time you find someone with in a closed area, you give them a strong verbal warning and indicate that you've done so by clipping the corner off their ticket.  Next time they're found in a closed area, it's obvious to whoever caught them that they've already been warned, and so we cut the ticket and they're done for the day.  If they give us trouble, we call in management/security and they're probably done for the season.

 

It might seem a bit harsh, and we don't like clipping tickets either, but when you ski in unsafe areas, it means that not only are you more likely to be injured, but you're putting us in a compromised position by having to rescue you from a potentially unsafe situation.

post #160 of 172
Quote:
Originally Posted by bashfulbird View Post

At my hill, the closed runs are closed for a reason.  Even if it's not obvious, there's probably exposed or barely covered snowmaking equipment or something like that.  Patrollers and management want the runs open just as much as you do, so if it's closed, there's a good reason why.

 

With that said, at my hill the policy is that the first time you find someone with in a closed area, you give them a strong verbal warning and indicate that you've done so by clipping the corner off their ticket.  Next time they're found in a closed area, it's obvious to whoever caught them that they've already been warned, and so we cut the ticket and they're done for the day.  If they give us trouble, we call in management/security and they're probably done for the season.

 

It might seem a bit harsh, and we don't like clipping tickets either, but when you ski in unsafe areas, it means that not only are you more likely to be injured, but you're putting us in a compromised position by having to rescue you from a potentially unsafe situation.

I feel so much safer having you watching over me.  For the life of me I don't know how I got to live 70years without your watchful concern.

post #161 of 172

Do what is right!

 

If the terrain is good, go tell the patrol and volunteer to help them look for that darned poacher.

post #162 of 172

Uh Pete, you are certainly welcome.

 

Now, please either apply for a job and become a patroller or stay the hell out of closed areas.smile.gif
 

post #163 of 172
Quote:
Originally Posted by bunion View Post

Uh Pete, you are certainly welcome.

 

Now, please either apply for a job and become a patroller or stay the hell out of closed areas.smile.gif
 

 

 

No way would I ever be a Nazzty patroller - I am to meek for such a macho job.  AND, I would have to arrest myself for felony rope ducking-life sentence.

post #164 of 172

I would do nothing and go on about my business which happens to be skiing...... 

post #165 of 172

YOu should follow them immediately because it surely means some hidden treasure is back there.  wink.gif

post #166 of 172

fwiw. . . Cliff signs mean just that. Ropes mean beware or go around. Closed means closed. Some ropes have closed signs on them or cliff signs on them. In my experience, ropes mean pay attention and proceed with caution, like a yellow light between stop and go.

post #167 of 172
Geesh...

Ducking ropes at Targhee can get you killed. Can't tell you how many idiots duck ropes here, not knowing what's on the other side.
post #168 of 172

Here is an example of a rope that folks constantly duck at Mt. Baker.  The area is open for skiing, is regularly patrolled, and is a big part of the ski area.  The signs don't say "closed" and the rope is there to be ducked.  There are closed areas beyond, but they are separately roped and signed with "closed" and "cliff" signs.

 

post #169 of 172

There is a reason for warning signs.  Disregard them and you have no one to blame but yourself. Unless you let others sway your decisions. If I saw others duck........not my problem.

post #170 of 172
Quote:
Originally Posted by krp8128 View Post

If it's closed, what are you (the patroller) doing there anyways?

I would assume that they are checking the trail to verify that it is skiable. Ski patrol is allowed anywhere on the mountain and they are the ones who dictate whether a run is open or closed. 

post #171 of 172
Quote:
Originally Posted by Posaune View Post

Here is an example of a rope that folks constantly duck at Mt. Baker.  The area is open for skiing, is regularly patrolled, and is a big part of the ski area.  The signs don't say "closed" and the rope is there to be ducked.  There are closed areas beyond, but they are separately roped and signed with "closed" and "cliff" signs.

 

Now I am wondering what's  there to be had beyond those ropes.... I never skiied Baker and hoping to get out there one of theses winters... 

post #172 of 172

So at the local hill, there's only one rope you can duck, and that's the area boundary rope. One guy who ducked a rope nearly got himself blown to bits after skiing directly over a lit charge that had been dropped from a helicopter. You think he'd have noticed, eh? He was even luckier that that slope held behind him. 

 

When working, I'll call patrol if I see someone duck a rope as there's no ambiguity in the hill rules. Have I had to? No. Doesn't happen much at all. 99.9% of skiers seem to actually respect that patrol does what it needs to and that there's a very compelling reason for closures. The difference might be that without real estate development at the base area, the average skier feels more 'ownership' and connection to the hill. We've got a lot of rollicking terrain on any given day ( unless it's snowing and blowing stink ) so there's pretty much something interesting to ski even if something is closed.

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