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ski patrol advise

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 
Hey I did it!!! I became a patroller. Mountian power, respect and now (the less prestigious) gossip. I am very young at the age of 20 and I have been skiing for about five years,(including, the one trip to the hill for a day, years at the beginning.) I always wanted to become apart of the most respected skiiers on the hill. Now I am immersed in the ethical contrivorsey (i cannot spell) of providing a fun ski enviornment and a safe one. I am getting sh!t because i am not lazy and I accomplish tasks that i have set for my self. Putting up safty lines and breaking down disastorious obsticals. My slope leaders make fun of me by providing lines like, hey he is only new and he will wise up, What the heck!! have the patrollers lost their frick'n mind. have they forgotted why they are out there? I understand they have been there for a long time and they know it all, but do they think that because of their time in service or because of their lack of drive? I am not up tight nor am i easily provoked or detered but i am wondering if any one out there could give up some of their tips to help this young patroller. Some day I am looking to be the best!! thanks
post #2 of 22
Welcome to the real world. Take your ethical and moral underpinnings with you where ever you go. Find someone you respect in the profession and ask him or her to mentor you. Do what is asked of you, and do it well. Satisfaction comes from doing something well, not from finding a way out of doing a difficult task. Understand that you are at the bottom of the totem pole and will draw the least enticing tasks. That will change with time. Devote yourself to learning and mastering your craft. You are now just in the initial learning phase. You have much to learn ahead of you. Make your goal to attain complete mastery of Ski Patrolling. If you are lucky and brave you may attain transcendence as a patroller. Become a mentor to new patrollers.

Go out and make a difference, help people, maybe even save a life. Now get outta here! [img]graemlins/thumbsup.gif[/img]

Mark
post #3 of 22
Hey Mitch, Congratulations on making the patrol. Don't let a bunch of tired old patrolers destroy your great outlook. I was a junior patroler at 17, then gratuated to senior status at 18 at what was then, "The National Ski Patrol". I worked at it for about four years while in college. I loved every minute of it.

To this day, 33 years later, I treasure those memories and have the greatest respect for the patrolers across the country. In addition, some of the techniques I learned for running sleds in those days have brought me great success today. In particular, tethering Bi-skis with fixed outriggers for disabled skiers, can be very challenging. Without question, the ski patrol training I received on sleds and tobogans has made me better today.

Keep up your attitude and enthusiasm, they will take you far.
Congratulations again and much success in this most worthwhile endeavor.
whtmt
post #4 of 22
yo mitch:

You must be new, but you'll wise up. Breaking up disastrous obstacles...gee...can you come to my mountain and cover up the rocks.

Sorry.....I'm cracking up.
post #5 of 22
Mitch just remember:

1)It’s all about the Jacket. Chicks dig the jacket.
2)Don’t take yourself too seriously.
3)The guys you are jamming on for being lazy will show you plenty by the end of the season.

Hope to make it up to Sandpoint for a little skiing this year, would love a tour of the mountain and Patrol Room.

Oh yeah, and since it is your rookie year - they will mess with you big time (in a fun way). A few strips of duck tape on the bottom of the ringleader's skis is always appropriate payback.

[ December 12, 2002, 10:51 AM: Message edited by: Tanglefoot ]
post #6 of 22
Tanglefoot is right...have fun and don't be toooo serious.

You do have a job to do... no one appreciates the police or fireman until needed, same with patrollers. It is neat seeing how areas operate. At my area, we have to be exposed to all of the jobs just in case we have to fill in during an emergency (has never happened except for the bathroom run for the liftie). Knowing how slopes are groomed helps us talk with the skiers so they don't get upset when a run is closed. Being able (expected) to ski in all weather and snow conditions is a skill that few skiers will learn...and enjoy.

The training that you will go through to get to your Senior and then National Appointment is tremondous. You'll have fun, build lasting friendships, and yes...even save a life or two.

Remember you are only a rookie for one year...thank goodness.
post #7 of 22
DO YOU HAVE HARNZ????????????? [img]graemlins/thumbsup.gif[/img]
post #8 of 22
Thread Starter 
Thanks every body for some of the tips. Maddog1959 thanks for the inspiration and wisdom. just so all of you know I am not a police man of the slopes, I do not stop any one from having fun; I am the one that is on the edge every time i go down. I love flirting with the "line" and the example we are suppose to set for skiiers and boarders. My example is one of movement and fun. lets take speed for a min. it goes hand in hand with some air, and as my fellow patroller and best friend would say." air is a by product of speed and a mogul." anywaze I wanted to ask a quick little question. What would you look for in a patroller?
post #9 of 22
Safe sled work and good meds!

CalG 4-61
post #10 of 22
I think the best patrollers are the ones that are invisible. Those guys who get out there, get there non emergency work done before the lifts open, and then are there when you need them. When I patrolled, the tam I was on learned the nickname "team darkside", because it was like we were on the darkside of the moon until we were needed (read: we did not use our radios unless absolutely necessary), then we would come out of the woodwork and get the job done as quickly as possible and as safe as possible. Learn all the tasks of your job well. Don't just say I want to be the best tobaggon handler or the first aid wiz. Oh yeah, constantly practice different scenarios. We would pull out a piece of equipment every morning and run through a scenario so that we knew when the time came, every member of teh team could perform any task with confidence. Keep in mind, your primary job when treating someone is to stabilize and transport the victim. Good luck.
post #11 of 22
What Crew Cut said. Pay attention to the part about staying off the radio. (Pet Peeve).

And have fun with the guests, make their day.
post #12 of 22
Yes, You are in the transportation business. Bag and Drag!

The mountain I patrol has a very high "daily tally" for codes. (still within the statistics).
Patients need to get off the hill for a number of reasons. That takes good sled work, and good meds. Assess, DON"T MISS ANYTHING! package and get going!

Mountain maintainance is were you get to show off. A clean mountain is attention to details like signage, coil and stow those ropes, uniform placing of boo. No bamboo forests. Tossing "death cookies" off the trail, etc.

Looking good while skiing never hurts. Pull in those sphincters.

Get some complimentary hot chocolate tickets and give 'em to the little kids you ski by for being "safe skiers" . Great impression on the kids and parents. (Mountain management will get after you, though).

Avoid skiing the trail edge and then upsetting some slow skier with an "on your right" call. Plan ahead, and slow down when in traffic.

Recognize good work and be willing to make the effort to do it!

CalG
post #13 of 22
Always say your thank yous when loading and unloading the lift. Wave to the poor guys stuck in the lift shacks.

Of course, what everyone else has said.
post #14 of 22
Patrollers have the best parties!

I patrolled before becoming an instructor around 1960 and have several funny/odd stories, one of them from my Senior exam.

....Ott
post #15 of 22
Quote:
Originally posted by Mitch:
Hey I did it!!! I became a patroller. Mountian power, respect and now (the less prestigious) gossip. I am very young at the age of 20 and I have been skiing for about five years,(including, the one trip to the hill for a day, years at the beginning.) I always wanted to become apart of the most respected skiiers on the hill. Now I am immersed in the ethical contrivorsey (i cannot spell) of providing a fun ski enviornment and a safe one. I am getting sh!t because i am not lazy and I accomplish tasks that i have set for my self. Putting up safty lines and breaking down disastorious obsticals. My slope leaders make fun of me by providing lines like, hey he is only new and he will wise up, What the heck!! have the patrollers lost their frick'n mind. have they forgotted why they are out there? I understand they have been there for a long time and they know it all, but do they think that because of their time in service or because of their lack of drive? I am not up tight nor am i easily provoked or detered but i am wondering if any one out there could give up some of their tips to help this young patroller. Some day I am looking to be the best!! thanks
The new patroller runs to every skier that falls. The old patroller watches and waits for the keys that give them a sense of urgency.

The new patroller stops people from skiing recklessly and injuring themselves. The old patroller watches to make sure actions of a skier do not infringe upon the rest of the public that also have a right to the mountain.

The new patroller yells stop while everyone listens to the outlandish authority. The old patroller makes a friend of the skier to be yelled at and explains the consequence of their actions on themselves and the other skiers quietly.

The new patroller skis the toughest part of the mountain and really looks cool. The old patroller skis the easiest part of the mountain and talks to the future customers making friends of the rug rats and parents as they go by.

The new patroller is enthusiastic as they should be and going strong. The old patroller understands these are our customers and while we must be strong they are our customers everyone on the mountain with no exception including the lifties and all other “hired” help.

I am here quietly when you don’t need me and rapidly when you do. “I am here because I care!”

I am a patroller 35 years and still in the background and now I teach you to ski so you can start my sport safely!

Best of luck to you! [img]graemlins/thumbsup.gif[/img]

[ December 16, 2002, 09:10 PM: Message edited by: Learner ]
post #16 of 22
Learner, beautifully said! .....Ott
post #17 of 22
Well Said Learner.

Thanks. We should all take notice of this post.

Happy Holidays..

:
post #18 of 22
Lots of good thoughts and sentiments here, but Learner--that was BEAUTIFUL! Very nicely said.

Congratulations, Mitch! With your energy and attitude, you will become a great patroller--an ambassador of the sport, an authority when required, and a friend in need. Good patrollers are the unsung heroes of the mountain!

Best regards,
Bob Barnes
post #19 of 22
Thread Starter 
You guys really do help in ways only skiers know how to. I am really grateful for the advise and for your heart-felt messages.(Learner) I am geting some great ideas and I just want to thank every one and their wisdom that can only come from years of understanding the sport or the emotion called skiing. once again thanks and think snow!!

special thanks to learner --I'm posting your words in every room in the public eye at my hill; Not for the public to see but to show the patrollers that may have lost touch with their reason or feelings to ski and or patrol that they really do make a difference no matter how little they think. God bless!!
post #20 of 22
Learner, well said!

May I borrow that to share at our refresher next fall! We often have a lot of new patrollers who are so eager to make it know that they are patrol that they often forget their real function. They need to model after a veteran who has learned the ropes, and understands their function.
post #21 of 22
Be my guest!
post #22 of 22
Thanks Learner! [img]graemlins/thumbsup.gif[/img]
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