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Why are edges rusting?

post #1 of 27
Thread Starter 
What do you do with the skis after skiing to keep them from rusting? I spend a lot of time on the sons' skis, and I'm finding rust on both the base and side edge from time to time. Is there a standard practice I should do after they are done for the day or night?

Thanks.
post #2 of 27
I put a little WD-40 on a paper towel and wipe the edges. Works great.
post #3 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Snowfan View Post
I put a little WD-40 on a paper towel and wipe the edges. Works great.
I use a rag. Just be careful not to cut yourself.
post #4 of 27
I find simply wiping them down well with a clean cotton cloth until completle DRY works fine. I have never used WD-40 and would not want that near or on my bases.

Generally speaking if your skis are left where it is about 37 degrees F or colder i have found they won't rust!
post #5 of 27
Thread Starter 
Interesting. I thought leaving them in the car overnight where it was presumably below 40 or so (garage), that they would be fine (got lazy during a 3-day race camp). I think that is when they rusted.

I typically bring them into the basement where I have my tuning shop, and wipe the edges down with either a paper towel or a cloth. I stand them up against the bench at an angle to let them dry out further, the skis standing on the floor (it is concrete, but a knee-saving rubberized mat that you put together like a puzzle, purchased at Menard's -- like Home Depot). There is always still water sitting in the bindings, the race plate. It is impossible to get all the snow out, even with a brush. So there will be water when I get home tonight, from last night.

I end up taking my gummi stone to the base edge and side edge to remove the rust, then diamond stones in the side edge guide to polish. I don't want to keep getting the rust....
post #6 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by dmoney24 View Post
Interesting. I thought leaving them in the car overnight where it was presumably below 40 or so (garage), that they would be fine (got lazy during a 3-day race camp). I think that is when they rusted.
If they're not dry when you leave the hill (or there is water or snow caught in the bindings), they can rust on the drive home while you have the car heat on.

Quote:
I typically bring them into the basement where I have my tuning shop, and wipe the edges down with either a paper towel or a cloth. I stand them up against the bench at an angle to let them dry out further, the skis standing on the floor (it is concrete, but a knee-saving rubberized mat that you put together like a puzzle, purchased at Menard's -- like Home Depot). There is always still water sitting in the bindings, the race plate. It is impossible to get all the snow out, even with a brush. So there will be water when I get home tonight, from last night.
Use a soft wax on the edges after you've dried the edges off.

FWIW, Zardoz do a specific rustblocking agent in their wipe-ons.
post #7 of 27
I don't know if we do a good enough job with (or harming) the bindings but our edges hardly ever rust. I (and have my kids to) wipe the base and edges down with a cotton rag. We also wipe down the top sheet after pounding (once) excessive snow out of the bindings. That the skis are hung vertically at indoor temp. That seems to do the trick.
post #8 of 27
I thought that leaving skis in the cold for a long time would harm the bases or do something and mess them up.. it that BS or true?
post #9 of 27
I hope not -- I ski them 6-8 hours at a time out in the cold
post #10 of 27
Don't use a ski rack unless they are in a bag. Road salt's murder on edges and bindings. If you have to rinse them off and dry them thoroughly before putting them up. As for WD 40, I don't think it will harm the bases. We used to spray it directly on the bases when using water ramps at the freestyle camp. Still, I think it would hinder the application of wax and ptex for maintenance-keep it from sticking. I try to put a coat of hot wax on them before putting them up, but if I'm too tired I'll just rub a block of storage wax along the edges after making sure they are dry.
post #11 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by skibum185 View Post
I thought that leaving skis in the cold for a long time would harm the bases or do something and mess them up.. it that BS or true?
I'm gonna go out on a limb here and say that a product that is designed to ski on frozen water can handle a good bit of time in the cold.

Seriously though, who told you that? I think they were pulling your chain.

The only way cold skis can get damaged is if you wax them while they are cold. You always want to wax when the skis are at or near room temperature.
post #12 of 27

I'm no scientist but...

Quote:
Originally Posted by skibum185 View Post
I thought that leaving skis in the cold for a long time would harm the bases or do something and mess them up.. it that BS or true?

I'm gonna go out on a limb here and say that a product that is designed to ski on frozen water can handle a good bit of time in the cold.
I would bet that the skis, like ski boots get exercised more from the exrtemes they go through than being in one environment than the other.

They get some version of:

Take them from the basement (45~55 deg), then possibly a car rack or trunk (varies, ski rack would be the coldest with the induced wind chill = single digits or negative), then ski on a frozen surface, leave them in the lodges ski rack while you take a break (could be same as cars ski rack), and eventually reverse the process until the skis are back in the basement.

The skis are seeing a variation of at least 50 degrees and could be as much as 70 if stored in a warmer area and again more if skied on a colder day.

All the pieces on a ski has their own co-efficient of thermal expansion (CTE) causing each to expand and contract at a different rate. This is what usually fatigues things the most.

The skis are probably better off always being out side and not coming inside.

As for the bases themselves, I think the only thing that would harm them outside is using them.
post #13 of 27
ha...im dumb =)
post #14 of 27
I rack mine vertically, bases against a sheet of plywood in a heated basement. They dry nice that way and the edges don't rust during the heating season. At the end of the winter I clean them up with car wash detergent and water, let them dry, then apply a thick coat of yellow HC wax on the bases, then store on the same rack. I end up with a little bit of rust on the sides of the edges but nothing deep, and after the first day on the snow followed by a sharpening its all gone.
post #15 of 27
I have the same rusting problem, my skies have been in the roof box in a gear bag, since I've been skiing about every 3 days.

Will the rust hurt anything or is mostly cosmetic? It's only surface rust and not deep pitting or anything.
post #16 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by bndfishing View Post
I have the same rusting problem, my skies have been in the roof box in a gear bag, since I've been skiing about every 3 days.

Will the rust hurt anything or is mostly cosmetic? It's only surface rust and not deep pitting or anything.
Take em out and let them dry.
post #17 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by bndfishing View Post
I have the same rusting problem, my skies have been in the roof box in a gear bag, since I've been skiing about every 3 days.
Make sure the skis are thoroughly dried before you stick them in the bag. It is far worse to trap in moisture than to leave it out in the open.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bndfishing View Post
Will the rust hurt anything or is mostly cosmetic? It's only surface rust and not deep pitting or anything.
Rust indicates damage/imperfection on the edges no matter how small. Whether rust or surface rust is a big deal depends on what you ski and where you ski. If you're into steeps and/or speed in the East, definitely keep your edges as sharp and as polished as possible.
post #18 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by bndfishing View Post
I have the same rusting problem, my skies have been in the roof box in a gear bag, since I've been skiing about every 3 days.

Will the rust hurt anything or is mostly cosmetic? It's only surface rust and not deep pitting or anything.
Leaving them in roof boxes is only 1 step better than using an open air rack. Look at the condensation inside the box sometime.
post #19 of 27
don't touch your edges after you do your polishing. The oils in your skin can promote rusting.
post #20 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Magnus_CA View Post
don't touch your edges after you do your polishing. The oils in your skin can promote rusting.
Damn...looks like I'm buying ANOTHER set of white cotton gloves...
post #21 of 27
Dry edges with towel, then use a wax stick. Next time you go out, just wipe the edges with a towel to remove any excess wax.
post #22 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by L&AirC View Post
The skis are probably better off always being out side and not coming inside.
Very true for XC skis. Not only are they -faster- when cold, but they don't have heavy, dense parts that don't expand much.

Imagine skis by a reputable maker, sitting in a warehouse in plastic for a bit (like oh, 2 winters and summers) then peeling their bases off within 2 hours of hitting snow on their first day. I think I've logged about ~25 miles total on sharp, pointy, non-slidy, 200cm "snowshoes".


Alpine skis, being heavier built with multi-ply wood cores, metal layers, steel edges, and (heavy) expansion matching/bonding layers, tend to have far fewer problems.
post #23 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by axebiker View Post
Leaving them in roof boxes is only 1 step better than using an open air rack. Look at the condensation inside the box sometime.
Sport tubes are the worst. Mine were in there for 18 hours coming back from a trip where I had no choice but to pack them wet and the edges where completely rusted when I took them out. A coarse diamond file cleaned them up though, but man they were ugly.
post #24 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Southern Man View Post
Sport tubes are the worst. Mine were in there for 18 hours coming back from a trip where I had no choice but to pack them wet and the edges where completely rusted when I took them out. A coarse diamond file cleaned them up though, but man they were ugly.
why couldn't you dry the skis off before you packed them?
post #25 of 27
Some surface color won't hurt anything unless you are a good racer hunting for every 100ths. Just ski it off next time. Or, rub some wax on the edges.
post #26 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Atomicman View Post
why couldn't you dry the skis off before you packed them?
I did as best as I could, but we skied the morning and took off for the airport around noon, and all I had was paper towels that I grabbed from the bathroom.
post #27 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by SoftSnowGuy View Post
Some surface color won't hurt anything unless you are a good racer hunting for every 100ths. Just ski it off next time. Or, rub some wax on the edges.
Yeah it was more of a visual shock than anything.
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