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First impressions of my new Gotamas

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 
I finally got my new Gotamas mounted today. They are 183's with Marker Jester bindings on traditional boot center. I am 5'10" 245 lbs. I skied them at Perfect North Slopes in Indiana which I know is far from what they were intended for. It was pretty warm today with a high in the mid 40's. We have seen a pretty drastic change in weather and snow conditions. This time last week we were struggling to get in to the 20's. On Sautrday it was 72 on the hill, and this morning they were making new snow. We has a soft layer of new new on top of frozen granular on top of ice/hard pack. I am simply amazed out how well these things ski. Despite the fact that they look more like water skis and the snow skis I am use to skiing they seem to want to do just about everything. I do notice that I have to stay on top of them. They just don't like lazy skiing. I guess that just more incentive to not be lazy. I haven't found the speed limit yet either. I would guesstimate that I had them up to about 40 or 45 mph and they were as smooth and stable as can be. Conventional thinking says they should not be this versatile but they are. Now I know what everyone raves about. I do kind of wish I had gone with a 190 but I will be pretty happy with my 183's.
post #2 of 23
I have same set up. I'm 5'10 190 Skied it Killington 3 days 4 feet of powder(over entire weekend).
I previously owned the Mantra.
My impressions were no tip dive at all but not a soft powder ski. Not easy to ski but as the previous thred wrote if you ski it hard you are rewarded.
Jumps were pillow like!
Varied snow was a strong point. Edge hold and carve were great! I was surprised. Needed a stronger driver than the Mantra for sure.
Probably less Pow specific ski than my Big Troubles that are only 92mm waist but gave far greater confidence than any other ski I've been on when you don't know what's coming.
post #3 of 23

Good Feedback Guys

I like the honesty of the above reviews. I demoed a pair of the Gotamas last winter at Schwitzer in Idaho during a great week of pow. They have the proper dimensions for good float but Vokl still wants to build a stout ski (like we where skiing austrian ice). I am 5,9 148 Lbs so I had to be up to speed to get them to decamber. I have had a pair of the Sumos (145/125/140) for a couple of years which were sitting in my garage that week. So I really blew it...... They are light and flexible for such a monster ski - allowing buttery turns in the woods at any speed.
post #4 of 23
I demoed some 176 Gotomas yesterday. I found them to be very versatle in a variety of snow conditions. I skied in windslab, powder, groomers, tight trees, and soft bumps. The ski was stable and easy to turn using carving and shmearing technique. I was unsure about length for me, 5'10" 160 lb, and am happy with the 176 as a ski that can do it all including my teaching demos. I didn't find the goat to be as demanding as other Volkls I've skied in the past. I am also using the Gotoma as a tele ski in the 168 length. It is a great and fun set up, but a bit different from the alpine.
post #5 of 23
Thread Starter 
I skied them again on New Years Eve. It was a boiler plate day. Temps were in the 20's vs. the 40-70 range over the last week. I know I would probably have been better off taking my Watea 84's or Rossi WC Radical RX's out but I just couldn't resist the call of new skis. They don't have the bite of a race ski but I had no problems carving some big arcs on our little hill. I am headed out the door for another day of skiing and I should get to test them on some softer man made today. I am nothing short of impressed with what these skis can do.
post #6 of 23
I'm gonna have to side with the "Gotama's are not for just burly Austrian's" contingent. I too was scared that they would require a Herminator to pilot (I only weigh 130lbs and ski the 07/08 176's), but they are the easiest to turn and most forgiving wide ski I've owned.

I also was finally able to determine that they ski quite well in deep snow. I just took them in 26" of fresh over an untracked base and they worked great - they made any turn shape at any speed (I didn't find that they needed speed to initiate a turn).

Given this and the fact that they handle most other conditions great for a tanker (except packed and, of course, hard pack) I feel no need to own a pair of "real" powder skis (i.e., wider and/or rockered, etc.). What a great ski for deep Colorado days!
post #7 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by cstreu1026 View Post
I do kind of wish I had gone with a 190 but I will be pretty happy with my 183's.
I'm 5'9 220# aggressive skier and have the 190s. I've only skied them deep days. Dreamy except steeps: 190s were a lot of board for me to bring around quickly (tiring).

I do kind of wish I had gone with a 183 but I will be pretty happy with my 190's.
post #8 of 23
Thread Starter 
I finally found something these skis won't do. I found a small area of man-made cement yesterday that I could not get an edge on. It was like nothing I have ever been on before. I don't know if any ski would have held an edge on that surface. I am truly blown away by how versatile these skis are. I just hope I can get a chance to try them in the conditions they were intended for when I go to Winter park in 3 weeks.
post #9 of 23
nice post. very helpful.
post #10 of 23
Thread Starter 

I finally got to ski them in some softer snow, spring-like wet granular snow.  One thought comes to mind...freaking awesome.  I even got ski a very small bump line with them.  These have to be me one of the most versatile skis on the market.  They only thing they aren't good at is short turns on hard snow.

post #11 of 23

Have 183's, 197lbs.  Skied in 11 inches of good dry powder last Tue and found them beyond my expectations.  Light, nimble very easy to turn, pretty much did anything I asked of them and more.  Skied open slopes, trees etc. and like them even more by end of day when skiing tougher stuff.  Discussed length with Bushwacker and he was really strong on the 183 for me and he was right. Skis are definitely with me next week at JH Gathering.

post #12 of 23
Thread Starter 

I am heading out to the Winter Park area next week so hopefully I will get try them out in their intended environment.  

post #13 of 23

Curious if anyone here has skied both the gold 08's and the new 09's, can compare flex. I ask because  I owned the original 04's, now the 08's. Every year, everyone says, "Oh, it's the same ski except for the graphics," but it isn't. For three out of the past five years, including this season, Volkl's increased the stiffness by about 15%. Which may not feel like much year to year, but it's nearly half again as stiff as the early black Goats, and I'm wondering if it's becoming more and more of a crud/groomed ski, less and less of a powder board. Not even a bad thing, just wondering.

post #14 of 23
Thread Starter 

I am still nothing but impressed with this ski.  Wednesday evening I went to the locla hill to enjoy the warm weather and spring conditions.  I started out on Watea 84's in some big bumps that had formed.  I just couldn't seem to find my groove though.  I switched to my Gotamas with the idea of just cruising groomers the rest of the evening but I got coaxed back in to the bumps when I ran in to some friends I haven't seen in years.  The Gotamas were great despite their width.  This will probably be the only ski I keep from my current quiver. 

post #15 of 23

    I just got my new 183cm 2009 goats.I had the chance to ski them once in variable conditioned soft snow.

From powder to crud, untouched and cut up tracks.My first impressions where not so good cause i felt the ski heavy and slow to respond.I was trying the wrong way.I was too slow!After some speed descents on soft groomers i was smiling ear to ear. They have fantastic carving capabilities and they are extremely responsive. You just have to ski them aggressively and do not forget...Be always on top of them!  The faster you ski, more stable the ski becomes.Great ski for what is made for. Carve them everywhere and the goats will make you happy as a child. You can maintain same speeds everywhere with tremendous stability.

   A fantastic fat ski for really aggressive skiing.

 In three days i will give them a better try at Alagna Monte Rosa Italy.

 

  

post #16 of 23

2010 vs. 2009 Gotamas:

I demo'd the '09 last week at a great powder day at Crystal Mtn. (WA), and loved the ski.  I can get them for  about $400 new.  My ski shop guy says there is a definite improvement in the the twin-tip, rockered 2010 model, which initiates turns more easily in powder.  So my question is, how much of a difference will that make.  And, is it worth paying another $200-$300?

Thanks.

post #17 of 23

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by seattlejon View Post

 

2010 vs. 2009 Gotamas:

I demo'd the '09 last week at a great powder day at Crystal Mtn. (WA), and loved the ski.  I can get them for  about $400 new.  My ski shop guy says there is a definite improvement in the the twin-tip, rockered 2010 model, which initiates turns more easily in powder.  So my question is, how much of a difference will that make.  And, is it worth paying another $200-$300?

Thanks.

The rockered tip will make it better in soft snow most likely, easier to initiate. The downside is that it won't be as good as the current Goat on hardpack if you are laying them up on edge.  If this is your soft snow ski primarily, the 2010 would likely be a better bet, but if you want a 1-ski quiver, I would get the 2009, or at least demo the 2010 before you pull the trigger, as it may not be the 1-ski quiver you are looking for.  

post #18 of 23

I think you've summarized it perfectly dawgcatching, and the comments at teton gravity say pretty much the same thing.

I have an old mid-fat (Dynastart Intuitiv 74) that I love on hardpack, but even on powder days, I want a ski that is reasonably good at speed on piste, which the '09 is.  Guess I better try 2010 before doing anything.

 

Thanks, and tough loss for the Dawgs yesterday...

post #19 of 23


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by seattlejon View Post

 

2010 vs. 2009 Gotamas:

I demo'd the '09 last week at a great powder day at Crystal Mtn. (WA), and loved the ski.  I can get them for  about $400 new.  My ski shop guy says there is a definite improvement in the the twin-tip, rockered 2010 model, which initiates turns more easily in powder.  So my question is, how much of a difference will that make.  And, is it worth paying another $200-$300?

Thanks.

Rocker won't initiate turn easier. Thats the opposite of what I want from a powder ski anyway. It will prevent tip dive. The whole reverse camber and rev side cut bla bla bla is to have a ski that smears and doesn't hook in pow.
 

post #20 of 23

At first I was excited about the description of the 2010 Got.  The more I've thought about it..I'm not sure.  I do think it must sacrifice at least some of the 09 versions ability on hardpack no?  It must trade that for even slightly better POW performance.  I have bigger skis than the Gots...but man...there's just not a ski that does so many things as well the current version.  I'm inclined to buy an extra pair of 09s...just to be sure I have them for awhile.  I will definitely try the 2010 version...but they are not going to my dedicated POW ski.

post #21 of 23

I have had a pair of Sumo's for several seasons as well - Smooth and buttery is a great description. They are champions in the really deep conditions- the biggest chore is bringing them with me on vacations only to have them sit when we don't get the pow!

 

post #22 of 23


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ski=free View Post


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by seattlejon View Post

 

2010 vs. 2009 Gotamas:

I demo'd the '09 last week at a great powder day at Crystal Mtn. (WA), and loved the ski.  I can get them for  about $400 new.  My ski shop guy says there is a definite improvement in the the twin-tip, rockered 2010 model, which initiates turns more easily in powder.  So my question is, how much of a difference will that make.  And, is it worth paying another $200-$300?

Thanks.

Rocker won't initiate turn easier. Thats the opposite of what I want from a powder ski anyway. It will prevent tip dive. The whole reverse camber and rev side cut bla bla bla is to have a ski that smears and doesn't hook in pow.
 


why wouldnt a rockered ski initiated a turn quicker? what is initiation exactly?

post #23 of 23

^^^^ Rocker refers to longitudinal curve patterns. It'll make a turn "easier" in the sense that it shortens the effective running surface, therefore less friction (same moments of inertia, though). Will pivot easier for same reason. However, it's my sense that most rockers (except for Moments) tend to have a bullet shaped tip, which means that the maximum width may be a) beyond the forward point of contact, and b) well behind the longest point on the ski. So the ski won't engage as quickly or cleanly on groomed when it's laid over on edge; sidecut shape issue. They'll have a slight vagueness/resistance, take a bit more conscious effort. The bullet shape is better in pow or crud for the same reason; you don't want to have the tip constantly trying to engage when one side touches snow. You want to turn the ski, not have the ski turn you. And in pow, you're not carving anyway...

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