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short turns for MA - Page 2

post #31 of 52
Thread Starter 
Following BigE's advise I seems to be getting a new feeling of being forward right after transition. This feeling enabled me to tip to new edge very early in starting the turn. Which in turns enabled me to control how sharp is the short turn. In this slomo vid I attempted a pretty icy narrow slope with around 30 degree pitch. Again I m not sure if my feeling is real or not. Only those have been there will be able to tell. Any comment will be much appreciated.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NBvTobipk9Q

Because this new feeling give me a lot of security. Later in the day I attempted brushed carve with this short turn method. I attempted a serious of alternating turns of brused carve and true carve. It seems work. I ll probably start another thread on brushed carve later if I get better understanding of it.
post #32 of 52
Carver, your new forward experience was very much a result of a strong CM move down the hill, accompanied with a pretty big pivot. Real engagement comes after redirection has occurred, around the falline. And with such good fore pressure, the turn post engagement is very sharp. As such, your turn shape is much more towards the 90 degree I suggested you practice a while back. Feel the speed control it provides?

Hint; it can be done arc to arc too. Not to say there's anything wrong with the pivoted version you were doing in the vid. They all should be in the tool box,,, they all carry value. Nice seeing this major execution variation find it's way into your repertoire.
post #33 of 52
Thread Starter 
Rick - thanks for offering your view. Yes, I remember the 90 degree thing. I didn't aware this turn is what can be taken as the turn shape control. Its great to have you confirm it.

Continue working on the moving CM forward thing give me a very different feel today. With even more knee flexion I am feeling on the edge most of the time now. I am not sure if its a brushed carve or short turn.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mmQgdStpOF0
post #34 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by TomB View Post
I think the main reason for that outsize foot skidding away is because Carver stands on the inside foot way too much. Even if he stops pressuring his boot, that outside ski will still run away if he keeps using the inside ski as a training wheel.
I'm seeing this too, even in your latest update. For the turns you are trying to demonstrate here you should be able to lift that inside foot off the snow at any point in the turn. It doesn't look like you would be able to do that in the top half of your turn. See if you can get some video doing that even...

Part of the reason for this is that you are leaning into the turn with your upper body. There are lots of drills for this but the one I see most common is to try and touch your outside boot with your outside hand or dragging the outside pole tip on the ground.

Establishing your balance point underneath your outside foot at the top of the turn will make a real difference in your turns I think.
post #35 of 52
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by onyxjl View Post
I'm seeing this too, even in your latest update.
Thank you for finding out my problem. I believe you are right because sometimes I feel my outside ski lose ski tip pressure and run away. However I can not see from the vid. May I ask you to point out in which turn (point in time) where there are evidence so that I can tell exactly what did I do? I can post up a slomo of the moment where it happen with high-clarification if it help.

later,

carver
post #36 of 52
It is easier to see on your left turns with this camera angle. The turns at around 7 and 10 seconds are good examples. When you start these turns it looks like you could draw a straight line from the top of your head, down your zipper and between your feet.

When you move your center into the new turn there needs to be a corresponding movement of the upper body towards the outside ski. This manifests as a crunch in the side of your waist towards your outside ski. On video this will appear as maintaining a vertical alignment of your jacket zipper, and an angle in the imaginary line connecting your head, waist and feet. If you neglect this countering movement then your balance point will move too far into the turn forcing you to stand on your inside foot.

The key to building this ability is to SLOW DOWN. Way down. So slow people in a wedge are blowing your doors off. The lack of speed will highlight when you are not getting your balance firmly established on your outside foot. You should be able to pick up your inside foot during these turns and not lose balance.

Interestingly enough, I heard an F1 racer talking about this balancing movement of the upper body as something he used in shifter-cart racing to increase grip on the outside wheels.
post #37 of 52
Slow down is right. Learn on the green, ramp up slowly on light blue, blue, dark blue until it breaks down.

Then go back to a comfortable pitch and see what you are doing wrong -- figure out why it doesn't translate. Fix it and go again.

You will ski faster on steeper pitches -- the goal is not to remain at the same speed on all runs. The goal is to refine the movements so that they work on steeper slopes too.....
post #38 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by carver_hk View Post
Rick - thanks for offering your view. Yes, I remember the 90 degree thing. I didn't aware this turn is what can be taken as the turn shape control. Its great to have you confirm it.

Continue working on the moving CM forward thing give me a very different feel today. With even more knee flexion I am feeling on the edge most of the time now. I am not sure if its a brushed carve or short turn.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mmQgdStpOF0
Great skiing Carver . Now, try skis with shorter side cut.
post #39 of 52
I see carver_hk is not completely committing the turn to the outside ski. The ski under the body is the 'safety' ski -- to the "stance" ski is not the only thing used to stand on....

Remember folks, carver_hk learned this stuff in a snow-dome and on harb carvers. He is skiing marvelously well given the circumstances....

Interestingly enough, his feet get much closer together on harb carvers and there is more angulation.

I blame the tune.

I suspect that the skis are not sharp, so they don't grip like rubber on pavement.

carver_hk, you would do well to invest in a small tuning kit -- 1 degree base, 2 degree side, 1 file clamp, 1 steel file, 1 diamond stone (400 grit), 1 brass brush, 1 nylon brush, a set of vices and iron a few different waxes and small portable 'table' (or even a sawhorse). Oh, and some emery paper, say 800 grit for polishing. And I almost forgot--a sidewall planer and a panzer file and some brake retainers.

Check holmenkol or swix web-sites for a tuning guide.

You will not be concerned about losing the edge if you keep them really sharp.

For travelling, take the diamond stone, brake retainers, vices and sawhorse ( swix makes a tiny one) and both base and side guides. Get the shop in the village to do a hotwax for you every two days.

There is nothing like a sharp ski. I am convinced your skis are not.
post #40 of 52
Thread Starter 
onyxjl - thanks for clarification. I can see it now. you reminded me that I did play with some very slow RR turns and was trying to lift the inside foot. It's pretty unstable for me. Sure I will work on it.

BigE & tdk6 - thanks for the kind word.

BigE - your description of 'safety ski' is very exact for me. I have a name for this phenomena for some time. I call it magic hand, which keep me from committing to the outside leg whenever I un-aware of it. I ll work on it at slow speed & the tuning stuff and see how it go.

My Xmas trip is over now. The progress on short turn is quite visible to myself. Actually with the new progress I can feel a lot more stable even on steep icy slope. Thanks all for offering help.
post #41 of 52
Thread Starter 
As promised, a slomo of higher clarification of the skis from 7sec to 10sec. I can see turn initiations with the outside ski's tip lacking pressure. Any more problem pick up from this more detailed slomo?

http://hk.youtube.com/watch?v=icxmVe5pMbo
post #42 of 52
Thanks for the feet clip. I happen to have an identical clip of my own feet. The difference is that I have skis with shorter side cut and my brushing is more even and not so massive after apex. Yours seem to go on and on and on. What BigE said, tune your skis properly and get some SL carvers with the mount point according to the ball of foot consept. I think a lot of your struggling comes from bad skis but not entirely offcourse. Your secondary movements with your upper body is not intact. You bank and stand on your inside ski. More angulation and outside ski pressure. Closing your stance completely will make you aware of where your balance point should be, over the outside ski. Great skiing anyway.
post #43 of 52
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tdk6 View Post
I happen to have an identical clip of my own feet. The difference is that I have skis with shorter side cut and my brushing is more even and not so massive after apex. Yours seem to go on and on and on.
It will be great to see your clip. I like to see my problems got contrasted with what's right.

Quote:
Originally Posted by tdk6 View Post
What BigE said, tune your skis properly and get some SL carvers with the mount point according to the ball of foot consept.
I m looking into the tunning as advised. Its a lot of articles to study and work to do before I can get some result. Besides I don't have the real slope to try things out now. I really wish there were service that can help with that here in Hong Kong.
post #44 of 52
carver hk, good work! remember to have fun too! although that does not seem to be an issue!
post #45 of 52
stick to mogul skiing.........it is clearly your strength.
post #46 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by carver_hk View Post
It will be great to see your clip. I like to see my problems got contrasted with what's right.
I was not saying its right in any ways or perfect but merely that its a remarcable close match in the way its filmed and also task at hand, short turns. Im on turnier skis and skiing relaxed short turns towards the camera on an easy flat and soft groomer. This was an alignment test with temporay reduced canting.
http://vimeo.com/2743410
post #47 of 52
Thread Starter 
Rusty Guy - thanks for the kind words.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rusty Guy View Post
stick to mogul skiing.........it is clearly your strength.
This is somewhat surprising to me. Unfortunately all I see is strength in struggling. I won't give up mogul anyway. Same with mogul & short turns I always have the other system in mind. Thanks for reminder.
post #48 of 52
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tdk6 View Post
I was not saying its right in any ways or perfect but merely that its a remarcable close match in the way its filmed and also task at hand, short turns. Im on turnier skis and skiing relaxed short turns towards the camera on an easy flat and soft groomer. This was an alignment test with temporay reduced canting.
http://vimeo.com/2743410
Yes, its a big coincidence. It seems this camera angle helps to see skiing more clearly just like doctors doing x-ray. If you like my view pls sent me a private.
post #49 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by carver_hk View Post
Rusty Guy - thanks for the kind words.

This is somewhat surprising to me. Unfortunately all I see is strength in struggling. I won't give up mogul anyway. Same with mogul & short turns I always have the other system in mind. Thanks for reminder.
carver,

I got a private message from a long time poster here that explained you are a fairly young/new student of the sport.

I guess my heartfelt advice to you is to find a teacher that you relate well to and take a few lessons. Trying to improve your skiing online has it's shortcomings.

I applaud your passion and wish you all the best!
post #50 of 52
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rusty Guy View Post
I guess my heartfelt advice to you is to find a teacher that you relate well to and take a few lessons. Trying to improve your skiing online has it's shortcomings.
Its true that I only started learning the sport seriously by skiing standard. Before that I was a holiday skier. I did take lessons from time to time but get me nowhere. Someone here helped me to change all that since 16 months ago. Your idea is great. I ll see what can I do about it.
post #51 of 52
I also applaud your passion, but how many days do you ski per season? Maybe you should move closer to snow instead of in a subtropics island?
post #52 of 52
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by RBC View Post
I also applaud your passion, but how many days do you ski per season?
Thanks. For the last 16 months its about 30 days on real mountains 4-5 hours a day and 80 days on indoor ski center or HarbCarver or inline skate 1-2 hours each. Before that I was just a tourist skier.

Quote:
Originally Posted by RBC View Post
Maybe you should move closer to snow instead of in a subtropics island?
Skiing is getting very interesting for me. But there are other sports that also interesting in Hong Kong. Sailing & Windsurfing in high wind in warm water is something not to be missed. And skating on country side too. What come next is the sea-food and good food from all over the world.
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