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"Resort kit" for basic upkeep?

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 
Any advice on what to bring to a week-long resort trip (or an eastern weekend trip)? I currently have NO tuning gear at all, and live in a carpeted apartment so setting up a repair bench at home and doing my own waxing and regular tuning is pretty much out - and my girlfriend is already peeved enough about my mtbike tuning setup as is! So basically I'm just looking for enough to keep things in decent shape.

Would a set of 200-400-600 diamonds and a multi-angle edge guide be enough, or should I really get an iron and a scraper for parking lot waxings too?

Thanks!

Edit: I do have the option of setting up a tuning stand at work, but it means lugging around my skis in Southwest Baltimore, and I'm not sure how to fix bullet holes in skis. I don't mind spending a bit more money for better results and easier maintenance.
post #2 of 8
Tuning is kind of messy, unless you are really careful. But if you are really careful, it takes longer and isn't as much fun.

I take a multi-edge tool (and stones/file that go with it, iron, one kind of wax, scraper, a ptex candle and a metal scraper on a week vacation. Don't bother for weekends. THe smallest and cheapest waxing irons are pretty small -- not a big deal to throw in the suitcase.

I did a ptex repair sitting on a bench in the parking lot of my motel last year, after I hit a small sharp rock. (Didn't want to stink up the room or have the smoke alarm go off). It worked out pretty well.

I waxed once (during a week trip) in the room, planning carefully to avoid scrapings in the carpet.
post #3 of 8
Plastic drop cloths for painting have proven invaluable for tuning in hotels/condos. I even use them at home just for the ease of cleaning up the basement.
post #4 of 8
Actually, the only thing I would bring is a polishing stone or maybe a multi-tuner and some rub-on wax, and leave any more involved work to a shop that can do work overnight (like one at a ski area). A light tune typically runs about $20 or so. That normally is more than it's needed over a week long trip.
post #5 of 8
chanwmr is probably right. It only makes sense to put up with the hassle of tuning on the road if you are already in the habit of doing it at home.

But... the last time I had someone tune my skis (at JH, by the way), he detuned the tips and tails! I didn't think to explicitly tell him not to do that because I didn't think anyone did that anymore.
post #6 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdf View Post
But... the last time I had someone tune my skis (at JH, by the way), he detuned the tips and tails! I didn't think to explicitly tell him not to do that because I didn't think anyone did that anymore.
Yeah, these things do happen (with any service provider not limiting to ski tuning) and it can be very frustrating. Although in this case, there is a way out at the expense of some base and edge material at the tips and tails.
post #7 of 8
I fit this in a medium size zip-lock:
-Multi Edge tuning tool
-1 File to fit
-1 diamond stone to fit
-1 chunk of wax, (I use Dominator Zoom)
-Ray's Way Wax Whizzard, (acts as an "iron", but w/o heat).
-small nylon brush

I touch up the nicks with the multi, "crayon" on wax, and rub it in, hard, with the Whizzard, and brush out the structure. The Whizzard is a very simple tool that creates heat from point-contact. Works well enough, and doesn't make a mess in the condo! I only use the file if I have to, try to stick to the diamond.
post #8 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdf View Post
chanwmr is probably right. It only makes sense to put up with the hassle of tuning on the road if you are already in the habit of doing it at home.

But... the last time I had someone tune my skis (at JH, by the way), he detuned the tips and tails! I didn't think to explicitly tell him not to do that because I didn't think anyone did that anymore.
Lots of shops de-tune, just make sure you ask the shop not to do so and you should be fine
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