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Multiple wax coats

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
Hi all;
Will "multiple" coats of wax last longer? What I'm getting at is for my annual vacation out west, is it going to do me any good to "build up" wax before leaving? If so, do I scrape and brush between coats?

My usual MO is hot-wax before putting 'em in the tube and taking along a bar of wax, (I like Dominator Zoom), and my Wax Whizzard; I rub on a coat each evening in the condo. I have a Mulit Edge for nicks and burrs.

What do you think?
CB
post #2 of 14
Since you are gonna be scraping and brushing before you hit the snow, multiple coats would be a waste of time. Better to put on one coat and heat it at optimal temp for a nice long time. As far as rubbing on wax - everybody's got their own opinions, but personally I think it's pretty useless since you're not really heating anything up and thus the wax stays right on the surface where it is completely scraped/brushed/skied off very quickly. Remember - wax goes in the base, not on it.
post #3 of 14
Well the "hot box" has been touted as a way to soak wax into the base. I don't think they are needed. With new skis I leave them on the wax bench with a thick coat of wax and reheated it every time I go to the garage fridge for another beer.

a few days and a few six packs and the base will have absorbed all the wax it can hold.
post #4 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jer View Post
useless since you're not really heating anything up
cork harder.
post #5 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by comprex View Post
cork harder.
No thanks. I'd rather lug an iron around. I can't imagine the effort it would take to cork a pair of 195cm long, 135mm wide skis.
post #6 of 14
the wax whizzard does a good job of heating up the wax. I've spent 2 weeks in a condo with exactly what you do C.B. and it's worked for me.

recently my tuning guru suggested using dominator momentium paste wax between hot wax treatments. seems to work and hold up pretty well too. spread it on, wait 1/2 hour, use the wax whizzard on it, then brush (I use horsehair.) I've gone 3 or more days of skiing without hot waxing this way.

oh and jer. you are just so cool, long and wide - I'm very impressed!
post #7 of 14
It's not really that you are adding more layers of wax to the top of the base, the multiple waxings help because the cycling of temperature helps the base accept more wax deeper into the base. This creates a deeper reservoir of wax for you to draw from over the course of time.
post #8 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by newfydog View Post
Well the "hot box" has been touted as a way to soak wax into the base. I don't think they are needed. With new skis I leave them on the wax bench with a thick coat of wax and reheated it every time I go to the garage fridge for another beer.

a few days and a few six packs and the base will have absorbed all the wax it can hold.
I'm going to follow Newfydog's idea of continually reheating a coat of wax. My question is, which wax should I use? I typically do mult coats of CH8 to prep my skis, but would something like a moly base prep be better? Thanks.
post #9 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by discobean7 View Post
My question is, which wax should I use?
The wax of the day.

You ski at Roundtop?

The simple answer is CH7. It works for almost everything except March slush. You can ski on your prep wax in that.

PM for more detailed answers.

Quote:
I typically do mult coats of CH8 to prep my skis, but would something like a moly base prep be better? Thanks.
Maybe, they weren't really talking about the prep/hot scraping wax in the thread tho.
post #10 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by discobean7 View Post
I'm going to follow Newfydog's idea of continually reheating a coat of wax. My question is, which wax should I use? I typically do mult coats of CH8 to prep my skis, but would something like a moly base prep be better? Thanks.
Hot boxing is impractical for the vast majority of DIYers and multiple coats of liquid or solids, heated is a very practical and easy to work into daily routines with skis sitting on a bench or stand.

I've been using a similar approach to newfydog's (though with less beer consumption). I'll start with Maplus RB Soft and light hot scrape after application, apply more and iron it several times. Scrape and brush, Apply, RB Hard and reheat several times, then scrape and brush and then apply the WOTD (wax of the day) following the same steps.

Part of the thinking is that just the fact you are saturating the base as Dr D said, with any wax in general will improve glide and durability.

The Maplus Waxing Manual is located in our Resources section to download. It has lots of good tuning and waxing tips, depending on performance goals. Here's an excerpt from page 15 on Saturation:

Quote:
SATURATION
The racing ski bases are generally made of ultra
high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE)
loaded with graphite.
The bases in UHMWPE are realized through sintering.
It is a process that consists in melting under
pressure high molecular weight polyethylene
powder mixed with additives in a cylindrical mould.
Once cooled down, the cylindrical shape obtained
is cut to the desired thickness by means of a peeling
device, thus generating the sintered base.
During the polyethylene cooling process, some
empty micro-spaces will originate at the points of
contact among crystalline microspherulites. The
base saturation is possible by spreading the liquid
paraffin in these empty micro-spaces. The heat is
crucial, because it keeps the paraffin liquid and generates
micro-movements of polyethylene, that facilitate
the final saturation of empty micro-spaces.
Thanks to electronic iron MAPLUS ELECTRONIC
IRON WAX, saturation occurs normally with about
30 waxing treatments, waiting from time to time
that the base cools down, in order to prevent the
ski internal structure from heating excessively.
For high-level, saturation is carried out in 2 or 3
times through the thermo bag, MAPLUS THERMO
WAXING BAG, that allows distributing the temperature
evenly, and consequently the paraffin across
the base. Just leave the ski covered with a thick
layer of paraffin in the bag at a temperature of 55 °
/ 60 ° C, for a period that can range from 24 to
36 hours according to the type of ski construction.
The temperature should not be higher than the one
indicated, as excessive heat can damage the internal
structure of the skis. MAPLUS SOFT RACING
BASIC shall be used because, during the saturation
process, it remains liquid at the temperature
indicated. The process is repeated 2 or 3 times
until the ski is taken off from the bag at the end of
treatment, still covered by the layer of paraffi n. At
this point, saturation is complete.
It is important to wait for the ski to cool down inside
the thermo bag closed, to prevent damage to the
structure of polyethylene and skis.
Instead of the thermo bag, the thermo cover MAPLUS
THERMO COVER can be used in the same
way, but in shorter time. The ski bases are compressed
against the thermo cover and saturation is
completed in 6 / 9 hours. The temperature of the
thermo cover can not be adjusted and it constantly
fluctuates between 55 ° / 60 ° C.
The use of the thermo bag or the thermo cover
compared to electronic iron makes skis immediately
more sliding and resistant to abrasion and dirt.
The saturation process must be repeated every
time the skis are grinded by a stone grinding
machine.
post #11 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by C.B. View Post
Hi all;
Will "multiple" coats of wax last longer? What I'm getting at is for my annual vacation out west, is it going to do me any good to "build up" wax before leaving? If so, do I scrape and brush between coats?

My usual MO is hot-wax before putting 'em in the tube and taking along a bar of wax, (I like Dominator Zoom), and my Wax Whizzard; I rub on a coat each evening in the condo. I have a Mulit Edge for nicks and burrs.

What do you think?
CB
I did this at Snowbird at ESA 2.

assuming you ski the same place on consequetive days, you can leave them for a hot wax at the resort shop for pickup the next morning
post #12 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by C.B. View Post
Hi all;
Will "multiple" coats of wax last longer? What I'm getting at is for my annual vacation out west, is it going to do me any good to "build up" wax before leaving? If so, do I scrape and brush between coats?

My usual MO is hot-wax before putting 'em in the tube and taking along a bar of wax, (I like Dominator Zoom), and my Wax Whizzard; I rub on a coat each evening in the condo. I have a Mulit Edge for nicks and burrs.

What do you think?
CB

 

What is a wax wizard?

 

Thanks, John

post #13 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by newfydog View Post
Well the "hot box" has been touted as a way to soak wax into the base. I don't think they are needed. With new skis I leave them on the wax bench with a thick coat of wax and reheated it every time I go to the garage fridge for another beer.

a few days and a few six packs and the base will have absorbed all the wax it can hold.

 

Have you experimented with the best waxing regimens?  What gives you the best glide: ales, lagers, pilsners? 

 

post #14 of 14
Quote:

What is a wax wizard?

 

 

It's put out by a company called Ray's Way, and is a great tool for applying wax and overlays after initial saturation.
 

http://www.alpineskituning.com/raysway.waxwhiz.htm

 


Edited by NE1 - Fri, 06 Feb 09 18:52:43 GMT
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