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Base Total Observation

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
I have passes to two local ski areas: Mt. Baker and Stevens Pass. I've been very interested in following the base total reporting for both areas. They are very different. At both areas we had a late start to the season and they both opened with very low snow pack. It has been snowing regularly and with some vigor over the last two weeks and things are beginning to fill in finally.

At Mt. Baker they report the daily totals of snowfall and then the total base. The base never goes down. There is now a reported 60 inches at the base and 70 at the top.

At Stevens Pass they report in a very similar way and the weather and snowfall have been similar, however the reported base keeps going down. Today it shrank to 39 inches.

Baker always has more snow than Stevens, but both areas have been experiencing powder conditions that obviously will consolidate over time as the weight of the new snow compresses the older stuff. Baker doesn't seem to report this consolidation the way Stevens does. I have skied Baker only, so far, and I can pretty much guarantee that there is no 5' 10" base on top where you ski. I would guess that it's more like the 39" that Stevens reports.

I don't know what this teaches me other than take it all with a grain of salt, but it sure is interesting.
post #2 of 10
Ski the East? They have the most bullshit snow totals!
post #3 of 10
The Steven's base thing has been sort of a running joke in our house for a week or two. The more it snows, the smaller their reported base gets . One day recently it was snowing all day up there & when we got home they were reporting an inch less base than in the AM... Pretty funny in light of how most areas report stuff.

BTW - there's a 2 foot base in my yard. And on my roof. For those who don't know the Seattle and Bellevue/Redmond areas, that's just plain nuts. Snow totals like that just don't happen in this neck of the woods. And snow definitely does not stay around for weeks at a time.
post #4 of 10
Skinning to work on your Praxis?
post #5 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by spindrift View Post
For those who don't know the Seattle and Bellevue/Redmond areas, that's just plain nuts. Snow totals like that just don't happen in this neck of the woods. And snow definitely does not stay around for weeks at a time.
It did when I lived there. When was that, like back in 1990. We got close to 2 feet at my house and it stayed around for at least 2 weeks.
post #6 of 10
Easy solution... how data is collected.

1- record each new snowfall, record the number and add it to yesterday. This results in high numbers that don't (actually) lie.

2- Measure what you see instead of measuring what has fallen and adding it to the base. This is truth... yet few resorts actually have a guy who goes outside and sticks a ruler in the snow.
post #7 of 10

Agree w/ Posuane

I agree with Posaune's assessment of how Baker calculates it's totals. I hike the mtn. (ski area) some in the summer / fall, and ski it in the winter, and it seems to me the top couldn't possibly have had feet of snow yesterday (ask my ski bottoms) albeit it did snow heavily all day, and further "albeit," yesterday was a fantastic day (Stickey was the place to be) as long as you stayed away from the lodge - busy place.
My bigger gripe, if I had one, and I don't, is they better concentrate on getting those chairs operating and running more smoothly instead of breaking down as frequently as they have so far this year, it has been a huge inconvenience.
post #8 of 10
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtbakersnow View Post
...they better concentrate on getting those chairs operating and running more smoothly instead of breaking down as frequently as they have so far this year, it has been a huge inconvenience.
Yesterday I was only a couple of chairs from loading 6 (at Baker) and the chair stopped suddenly, no slow down. The diesel engine had stopped. A lifty came over, took an aluminum step ladder out that was conveniently propped up near the bull wheel. He stuck it under the wheel, climbed up so that his upper body was up between the spokes of the wheel, took a small sledge hammer and started whacking away at something up above. After a couple minutes of him smacking this thing he climbed down, put the ladder away, and climbed up to the motor house and started the lift. It died, he started it, it died, he started it, ect., until finally it kept going. The loading began and there didn't seem to be any problems. It just goes to show that if you have a problem with something, get a bigger hammer.
post #9 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Posaune View Post
It just goes to show that if you have a problem with something, get a bigger hammer.
Hmmm how big a hammer? I'll screw the lift attendant and do it myself.
post #10 of 10
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by skiking4 View Post
Hmmm how big a hammer? I'll screw the lift attendant and do it myself.
As hard as I try, I can't understand this post. I guess. I'm just dense.
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