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Skier dies at Squaw - Page 2

post #31 of 45
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bean View Post
And yet it's still unlikely. I don't personally know anyone who's been caught in an avalanche, so since it's so unlikely, why bother?

In fact, why wear a helmet or a seatbelt? According to you a risk that's unlikely isn't worth preparing for.

the risk of dying in a car crash is magnitudes higher than dying in an inbounds avalanche
post #32 of 45
And the risk of dying in an inbounds avy this season so far infinitely higher than dying from falling off the lift, but that doesn't stop countless gapers from slamming the bar down before the chair even clears the bullwheel.

This is an incredibly tragic event and not the first this year. Why are you arguing against safety?
post #33 of 45
Bean everyone understands that if you have a beacon its not a big deal to wear it.

What the others are saying is that for the average skier, who skis a couple trips a year and is always in-bounds, it makes no sense to buy a $300+ beacon as it is not increasing their safety significantly. It has nothing to do with wearing or buying batteries for it. As others have also pointed out carrying a beacon would have done this man no good as he was alone when the avalanche occurred. In this case it would have been more beneficial to have had a buddy.
post #34 of 45
This could be the breakthrough season for beacons. I remember the same thing happening with helmets, they were considered the racer equipment and nowdays everyone wears them without any second thoughts. The game-changers were two celebrity deaths that year. Obviously people skiing groomed runs need not wear a beacon, but people going offtrail a lot may do that on powder days. I also noticed a lot of Recco reflectors on skiwear these days, not as good as a beacon obviously but still better than nothing.
post #35 of 45
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bean View Post
Why are you arguing against safety?
For the same reason why I don't feel the need to walk around covered in rubber insulation just because there's lightning outside. You must think before you do things. And part of that thinking involves realizing that there's a difference between a 1/1000 chance and a 1/1,000,000 chance, even though both are "unlikely." There's a difference between the chance of death when I get into a car from the chance of death when I click into my ski bindings. And it seems to me that you don't spend much time thinking about these things. But perhaps you should.
post #36 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cirquerider View Post
The idea of everyone on the mountain carrying beacons is not something we should be encouraging. The risk is incredibly small for most skiers, because they don't ski in the terrain and conditions that is likely to pose a risk. A beacon is not going to save your life by itself. Even in backcountry, a beacon is the last resort when everything else you should have done, failed. Its useless without a partner who knows how to conduct a search and who can probe and dig you out. If everyone is wearing beacons and has little or no idea what they are doing, the false positives from all these beacons is going to inhibit rescue searchers as all the bystanders will be emitting signals.
Cirquerider makes a great point here.

Sad to here about this tragedy. Everyone please be careful, nature is a powerful thing. Be aware of what is going on around you & weigh the risk/reward consequences.
JF
post #37 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bean View Post
And yet it's still unlikely. I don't personally know anyone who's been caught in an avalanche, so since it's so unlikely, why bother?

In fact, why wear a helmet or a seatbelt? According to you a risk that's unlikely isn't worth preparing for.
Bean,
You make a very good argument, and to think I was considering getting a useless helmet on a boxing week sale. However, ever since that one time back in '76 when the car spun out on my dad and he ended up in my lap in the passenger seat, I insist that at least the driver should be firmly fastened behind the steering wheel.
post #38 of 45
Being aware of your surroundings and paying attention to what you do plus a bit of good old common sense usually keeps your tit out of the ringer. However,there is a sh*% happens category.It's a Mt. during Winter conditions and your sliding down the side of it on 2 sticks,that's dangerous. Sad affair.
post #39 of 45
Really, if everybody at any given ski area started wearing beacons it would probably make a search an excercise in futility. I wear the gear because I already have it for backcountry skiing and because I frequently do sidecountry runs from lifts. I'd have a really hard time spending $300 on a beacon that I'd only use for a week of skiing at a resort every year. Others may not.
post #40 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by apeyros View Post
You all should know skiing is dangerous. If you don't want to die you shouldn't ski powder, ski green cruisers, bunny hills and hills with less than 100'' snowfall and be happy!
Sarcasm Epic Fail
post #41 of 45
[quote=Cirquerider;1024735]The idea of everyone on the mountain carrying beacons is not something we should be encouraging. The risk is incredibly small for most skiers, because they don't ski in the terrain and conditions that is likely to pose a risk. A beacon is not going to save your life by itself. Even in backcountry, a beacon is the last resort when everything else you should have done, failed. Its useless without a partner who knows how to conduct a search and who can probe and dig you out. If everyone is wearing beacons and has little or no idea what they are doing, the false positives from all these beacons is going to inhibit rescue searchers as all the bystanders will be emitting signals.
quote]

I thought that everyone else was supposed to switch from broadcast to receive mode when one or more people were buried?
And then the only ones who were still broadcasting would be the ones who were buried, or disabled?
I'll ski out of bounds at Hunter when they invent Leaf Root and Rock skis, for skiing on bare forest floors...
post #42 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phlogiston View Post
I thought that everyone else was supposed to switch from broadcast to receive mode when one or more people were buried?
And then the only ones who were still broadcasting would be the ones who were buried, or disabled?

In theory, yes - that's how it works. In reality, at a ski area, there would potentially be dozens and dozens of onlookers comming and going who didn't get the word (or possibly not even know how) to switch to search. There are many many people at resorts who don't even know how to cock their heelpieces so they can get back into their bindings. I could just imagine these same people with transcievers.
post #43 of 45

focus on the terrible sadness here

I think it would be appropriate in this thread to show unconditional respect for the skier and his friends and family. Maybe a separate thread, and we've had them, on how to be safe inbounds (especially how a group can ski to protect each other) would be a more compassionate way to approach the tragedy from two angles, respect and prevention. For those of us at Squaw, this is not a hypothetical example. This was a great guy with lots of friends and people he helped to enjoy skiing. I was skiing there that day and all of a sudden it sank in, and for a moment I was crying and skiing at the same time. R you will be missed by everyone who knew you.
post #44 of 45
^ good call

RIP
post #45 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aleph Null View Post
Man... this is shaping up to be a really, really scary season. Be careful out there everyone.

Best wishes to the Tahoe community and Davis's family.
X2
Mortality hits home, especially when someone who shares our passion meets it face to face.
It touches us, because we open our hearts to this passion.

Love and prayers go out to him and his family
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