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Shop grind?

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
I am still skiing on a pair of the original K2 ModX... I have always done my own tuning religiously - every 3rd ski day through the season: hot wax, scraping and edge filing. I have never had these skis into a shop for grinding. Aside from a few rock blemishes that I have ptexed, the bases appear to be in great shape... the edges are chipped in a couple spots (not big chips) from a rock last week.

Should I take them in for a shop grind? What treatment after a shop grind should I do? I believe my edge bevel is either 1&2 or 2&2... not sure, but my file(s) have always been set to it (the original factory bevel).

Thanks.
post #2 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mikla View Post
I am still skiing on a pair of the original K2 ModX... I have always done my own tuning religiously - every 3rd ski day through the season: hot wax, scraping and edge filing. I have never had these skis into a shop for grinding. Aside from a few rock blemishes that I have ptexed, the bases appear to be in great shape... the edges are chipped in a couple spots (not big chips) from a rock last week.

Should I take them in for a shop grind? What treatment after a shop grind should I do? I believe my edge bevel is either 1&2 or 2&2... not sure, but my file(s) have always been set to it (the original factory bevel).

Thanks.
If your ski bottom is edge high/base low, you are due for a grind. After many years without a grind, I wouldn't be surprised if that is the case. Also, your skis will glide better with a fresh structure. I think a 1 base bevel and 2 side degree bevel should be safe. That is what I was tuning ModXs when I worked as a shop rat.

Dennis
post #3 of 9
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the reply, Dennis...

Perhaps you can answer another question for me... I haven't skied a lot in the last few years due to health issues and I have forgotten what the 3 lever (Marker Logic?) settings on my Marker M9.1 bindings are for. I have always skied them on the middle #2 setting but cannot remember which is for softer (powder) and which is for stiffer/firmer (hard pack and ice)? Can you set me straight?

thanks
post #4 of 9
Gimmick switch, no realy difference. But if I recall 1 is firmer and 3 is softer.
post #5 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mikla View Post
Thanks for the reply, Dennis...

Perhaps you can answer another question for me... I haven't skied a lot in the last few years due to health issues and I have forgotten what the 3 lever (Marker Logic?) settings on my Marker M9.1 bindings are for. I have always skied them on the middle #2 setting but cannot remember which is for softer (powder) and which is for stiffer/firmer (hard pack and ice)? Can you set me straight?

thanks
That was a slect control that was designed to either increase the allowed flex or decrease it depending on conditions. The 1 was if my memory is correct for hard pack, ice - ie stiffer setting. The 3 was for powder or softer snow- ie softer than the standard setting.

Many as previous posted has stated thought it was really a gimmick and you can just continue to ski them on 2 in all conditions if you wish. The select control also had a reputation for pre-releasing also.
post #6 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mikla View Post
Thanks for the reply, Dennis...

Perhaps you can answer another question for me... I haven't skied a lot in the last few years due to health issues and I have forgotten what the 3 lever (Marker Logic?) settings on my Marker M9.1 bindings are for. I have always skied them on the middle #2 setting but cannot remember which is for softer (powder) and which is for stiffer/firmer (hard pack and ice)? Can you set me straight?

thanks
#1 allowed the toe piece to float on the front track. This allowed the ski to have as much flex as possible.

#2 added some resistance.

#3 added more resistance.

Since this post contradicts the previous reply, go over to your skis and flex them in each setting. In setting #1, you should see the toe glide freely over its track. In setting #3, you should see minimal glide.

Dennis
post #7 of 9
A base grind would be a good idea, as mentioned it is unlikely that your bases are still true after so many years; also, fresh structure will give your skis a new feel and keep them from sticking to the snow. I would be surprised if you had a 2 degree base bevel, 1 degree is pretty standard although if you really want to play it safe you can have the shop do .5 degrees and then increase it from there. Remember on the base you can always increase the base bevel but to decrease it you need a base grind. 2 or 3 degrees for a side bevel usually works pretty well, the 3 degree will give you more grip on the hard pack but the 2 degree will hold up better especially if you're into tree skiing and like to pop off the trail. Finally last but not least, the shop should be able to give you the factory tuning specs for that particular ski if you're really lost at a starting point. Don't forget after a base grind your bases will be very dry so apply at least 3 coats of hot wax before hitting the mountain.
post #8 of 9
Where do you ski?...Red? You don't need flat bottoms nor edges in powder. On pack, especially hard pack, you'll really like flat bottoms, good structure, and sharp edges. I like 1° bottom bevel and 3° side bevel. It gives better grip on hard pack than 2°. The downside is that when a rock is hit, a bigger chunk of edges is knocked out.
post #9 of 9
Thread Starter 
Hi,
Thanks to all for the replies.

I ski 49 Degrees North mostly, since moving back to the east side in '02... periodically I ski Schweitzer. Mostly pow, packed and groomed.

I have cared for my skis religiously since buying them in 2001... after every 3rd ski day I sharpen the edges 1.5 base and 2.0 sides. I use a toko file setup that is adjustable for both, and files each edge simultaneously. (I have kept them sharp enough to cut my gloves) Then I clean with citrus cleaner and copper brush, which pretty much cleans out the old wax and works the structure of the base. After a scrub and rinse, I hotwax 2 to 3 times to uniform temp from tip to tail for the temps I am anticipating at the hill; after complete cooling, scrape, brush/polish with toko nylon bristle brush (fairly stiff bristles), finishing off with with a horsehair brush... off-season storage is cool, dry closet.

After checking with straightedge, my bases are still in pretty decent shape, but the stone grind will take care of the few rock pits in the edges (which I believe have hardened in spots from the rock friction).

I gather from other posts here that I can tell the shop what bevel angles?

I'm having an internal debate about where to have the grind done... Sportscreel in Spokane (180 mi round trip) or up on the ski hill... If I can get it done in a day (drop off morning, pick up afternoon/evening) then Spokane isn't unreasonable.

Anyway, thanks again... nice to be back.
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