EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › Keeping 11 y/o Feet Warm
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Keeping 11 y/o Feet Warm

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
I know there are several ways to keep feet warm; Hotronics, Intuition liners, chemical foot warmers, etc. Between X-mas presents and in-laws flying in, and everything else I've bought for skiing, Hotronics aren't in the budget. At least not if I'm going to have enough money to go skiing.

The Boot Guys gave me several good suggestions on this http://forums.epicski.com/showthread.php?t=77451and I'm implementing those. The boots fit my daughter very well. I'm just trying to get her feet to stay warm.

From their suggestions and others I'm doing the following: more carefully buckling of the boot, neoprene toe caps, foil tape around the liner, and foil tape on either the zeppa or a bontex shim (I'm leaning towards the zeppa as she is starting to run out of room in the toe box with the neoprene toe cap).

Has anyone had any experiences using the foil tape on the inside of the shell as well as the outside of the liner? I understand that the tape is designed to have the shiny side face what you wan to keep out (around liner keeps cold out). If you put it on the inside of the shell with the shiny side facing the foot, wouldn't that keep the heat towards the foot? Other than it is easier to do the liner than inside the shell, why not do both. It should create an air pocket for more insulation.

We're planning on skiing on Friday and I would prefer to NOT repeat this past Sunday; 6 runs with 2 trips to the lodge in between to adjust her boots and we still had to leave. We had just received about 12" of fresh powdrer Friday and were getting dumped on while skiing and the skiing was great! It hurt to leave but I can't have her suffering either.

Thanks in advance,

Ken
post #2 of 17
I've been using the hotpacks for my kids for the last few years. I picked up a 10 pack at Home Depot for $12.00 which is a lot cheaper than buying them at the ski hill.

Good luck.
post #3 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiNut View Post
I've been using the hotpacks for my kids for the last few years. I picked up a 10 pack at Home Depot for $12.00 which is a lot cheaper than buying them at the ski hill.

Good luck.
We did try these but will try them again in another position. So you know COSTOC sells a box of 30 packs for $13.99. A box of Hand Warmers with 40 or 44 packs is $14.99 (or very close to that). There are also a few foot warmers in the hand warmer box.
post #4 of 17
One thing I've discovered is that everyone once in a while there is a dud that doesn't work - it just goes hard (happended last weekend ). Not sure why, so I always make sure I give the kids extra packs just in case.

Good luck.
post #5 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by L&AirC View Post

The Boot Guys gave me several good suggestions on this http://forums.epicski.com/showthread.php?t=77451and I'm implementing those. The boots fit my daughter very well. I'm just trying to get her feet to stay warm.

From their suggestions and others I'm doing the following: more carefully buckling of the boot, neoprene toe caps, foil tape around the liner, and foil tape on either the zeppa or a bontex shim (I'm leaning towards the zeppa as she is starting to run out of room in the toe box with the neoprene toe cap).

Has anyone had any experiences using the foil tape on the inside of the shell as well as the outside of the liner? I understand that the tape is designed to have the shiny side face what you wan to keep out (around liner keeps cold out). If you put it on the inside of the shell with the shiny side facing the foot, wouldn't that keep the heat towards the foot? Other than it is easier to do the liner than inside the shell, why not do both. It should create an air pocket for more insulation.

We're planning on skiing on Friday and I would prefer to NOT repeat this past Sunday; 6 runs with 2 trips to the lodge in between to adjust her boots and we still had to leave. We had just received about 12" of fresh powdrer Friday and were getting dumped on while skiing and the skiing was great! It hurt to leave but I can't have her suffering either.

Thanks in advance,

Ken
A-----
The foil is designed to reflect infrared radiation. In this case the radiator is the foot. Shiny side towards foot.

Otherwise, wherever you can get the foil to stick.

Double layers not really that effective as the outer layer is shadowed by the inner,

except for the trickle of heat that passes to whatever's in between the two layers by conduction and convection of moist air, then gets radiated from -there- instead of the foot.

B----
What about Boot Gloves? I understand that she is 11 and that fashion comes before function, so typical alpine ones are out. ]


The small boots may be an advantage here, you may be able to adapt something from the
bike world

http://www.bikemania.biz/Shoe_Covers_Booties_s/203.htm

or the XC ski world and skate world, search on Thermal skate covers.


Hey, it's good enough for Ice Castles??? Don't all 11yr old girls want to be the girl from Ice Castles in between ponies?
post #6 of 17
Comprex has it right. Shiny side facing towards the foot. Hope it works out for you. Next time you're in a ski shop, just for overall info, check out the features Lange has incorporated in their liners of the Exclusive line of womens boots. All added for warmth. Same things the bootfitters have recommended you do, Lange incorporated into the womens product.

Socks make a huge difference. Good wool ski socks just can't be beat. My kid likes the Jeannie Thoren socks alot. Just a tad thicker with some fiber loft on the skin side. Or maybe he just likes that she gave him a few pair. But his feet stay warm. If not quite enough warmth, you could try an Alpaca fiber sock. Haven't used them skiing, but for winter foot warmth, they beat wool. We'd find them too toasty for skiing, but our feet don't get cold in our boots.
post #7 of 17
I've heard good results from some people with those neoprene "Boot Glove" covers. Opinions on metal foil seem mixed at best.

Chemical warmers should work like a charm. Buy 'em in bulk.

I assume the boots actually fit... ie, her feet don't get cold/numb/cramped just sitting/walking around the lodge. If you don't have good circulation going, not much will help.
post #8 of 17
Biggest problem with my kids was keeping them bundled up in their coats and mittens. We only bought ski coats with hoods and then put cheap ski hat on their head, a face mask and the pulled up the hood and put the goggles on over the hood. I guess my main point is we concentrated on keeping everything else covered up as much as we did working on the boots.
That said, my other key was to ALWAYS take the liners out of the boots and make certain the were dry overnight, otherwise they stay wet for days.
post #9 of 17
Thread Starter 
Comprex -Thanks!

Quote:
Originally Posted by comprex View Post
A-----
The foil is designed to reflect infrared radiation. In this case the radiator is the foot. Shiny side towards foot.

I guess I was thrown off by the info and pictures at dryguy.net (boot glove site). It looks like they wrapped the toe in the same foil tape (though they call it thermal feet toe wrap).

Otherwise, wherever you can get the foil to stick.

I'll attempt the inside of the shell. I already did the zeppa.

B----
What about Boot Gloves? I understand that she is 11 and that fashion comes before function, so typical alpine ones are out. ]

That will be the next swing at the bat. Thanks for the lead on bike world.

Hey, it's good enough for Ice Castles??? Don't all 11yr old girls want to be the girl from Ice Castles in between ponies?

Wrong daughter. I don't think this one wouldn't even know what Ice Castles is. Her new "I got to have it" T Shirt is an Anime girl toting a chainsaw with "You want some of this?" Or something close to that written on it. Just to give you an idea. She prefers zombie movies and I threaten her with having to watch High School Musical or the Hanson Brothers.
911over - Thanks!

She was wearing her Fox River ski socks. I'm actually going to try thinner over thicker as she gets some pressure on her pinky toe with her thicker ski socks on.

I'll see what I can find on the Apalca socks.

Matthias99 - Thanks!

Boots fit very well. Have the warmers (in bulk from Costco), boot glove is next.
post #10 of 17
Since I'm in a similar dilemma, I'd like to add another thing to this thread....

Another factor is the liner of the boot itself. My 12yo has always had trouble with cold feet (since she was an infant) and she doesn't like toe warmers (she likes her boots snug and free of obstruction). Up to recently, boot gloves have worked for her so long as they are put on indoors before she headed out. However, because she has outgrown her Lange liners (they are very warm according to her), I have just swapped in another pair from another brand (Head). Even though the fit is fine with the new setup, she has been complaining about being cold/frozen constantly once again.

Here are a couple of things I am thinking about trying.
  • put in a toe warmer in the current setup regardless, if she can deal with that without affecting performance, that's good enough
  • though not ideal from a performance standpoint, go .5 to 1 size bigger on the Langes; that way she still has warm liners and I have more room to play with for toe warmer
  • try the foil approach on the boot boards; cheap enough to try without anything to lose
  • really warm up the boots before the boots and the boot gloves are put on; this will not work on the sub-zero days
  • a combination of the above
Any other suggestions? Anyone?
post #11 of 17
A couple people mentioned socks... one other cause of "cold feet" can actually be your feet getting too warm. Once they get very warm, they start to sweat, and once your feet are wet, they get very very cold very fast. And it's nearly impossible to get them to dry out once they're wet and cold.

If that is happening, you actually need *less* insulation (usually thinner socks). Definitely use wool socks or some kind of wicking synthetic -- not cotton. I like the Smartwool ones, partly because their biggest size is actually big enough for me.
post #12 of 17
Perhaps anti-perpirant sprayed on the feet to help keep them dry?
post #13 of 17
I skied with my almost-11-y-o daughter last Saturday when it was about 3 degrees, plus wind. We used the flat insole warmers inside her boot, and then Boot Gloves outside; stick a hand warmer on top of the boot before putting on the Boot Glove for extra warmth. It worked for her ... I was actually surprised.

With my son, 14, we used the insole warmers and a toe warmer on top of his foot. His boots are new and have enough room for that setup (ie, we're banking on him growing another size), and it worked for him, too. I would like to get him Boot Gloves, as well.
post #14 of 17
I ski with regular champion socks.

I use intuition powerwraps and my feet are never cold.
post #15 of 17
I use the flat chemical toe warmers and a thinnish sock. I pull out the insole and attach it to the underside so that it's between the insole and the liner. My kids boots are generally roomier in the early season anyway, when spring comes, they've grown and the warmer's not needed.
post #16 of 17
Wigwam ski sock that has Outlast material in it.
Superfeet Wintergreen footbed with Outlast material on it.

These may help to some degree. This will also be dependent on the fit of the boot.

Dennis
post #17 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Denny1969 View Post
These may help to some degree. This will also be dependent on the fit of the boot.
Dennis
Very punny
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Gear Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › Keeping 11 y/o Feet Warm