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Help me figure out which type of skis to get?

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
I can't remember what size skis to get, but I know 160's make me feel like I'm learning the basics all over again. I'm 5'7" and weigh 160lbs. A friend of mine told me I should get skis that come to my chin. I was also told to get the right type of skis and should probably go with a pair that is suited for piste/groomed snow.

I went over to Wachusett mountain last weekend and used 160's. I was finding it very difficult to keep my skis close. Turning was also an issue. I ended up with my back towards the bottom of the mountain every time I tried to "stop on a dime". I would stop, but pretty much everything I did felt sloppy and I found myself thinking about the basics while I was skiing instead of just doing it like last year.

Now I'm not sure if it's because I never skied on powder before or the skis were just way too big for me. I could use some help finding out what I should be using because I am planning on buying some skis, boots and bindings this year. I could definitely use some help from the experienced crowd around here. I hope some of you can help me decide which set up would be good for me to start out with.
post #2 of 10
Mikey;

Welcome!

160 cm doesn't seem too long for your build to me. Unless you travel west you aren't likely to ski deep snow very often. It sounds to me like you are still at an exciting tangent on the learning curve. Try some other sizes in the 160-170cm range on hardpack and if you're skiing intermediate advanced runs comfortable don't go shorter. I'd recommend trying a carving ski or possibly a MidFat in about a 165 or 170 cm. Skiing deep snow takes a different technique, and having fatter skis does make it easier, but fatter skis aren't ideal (or good at all IMO) on groomed snow.
post #3 of 10
Thread Starter 
I copied this from the sticky thread and added my info so hope this helps.

* Tell them enough about yourself:
o Male, 5'7", 160, 30
o beginner/intermediate, I like groomed-smooth/even slopes, I plan to ski aggressive in the morning and casual after lunch then all out just before leaving, I don't know what turn shape I use I just cut when it feels right unless people are around me then I ski according to what they do so random I guess, I am usually passing people on the mountain when it's not crammed and I'm stuck behind groups, I have been to cannon, loon, killington, wachusetts and a couple others I have forgtten. I remember staying with my buddy on the black diamonds all day long before and use to think wachusetts was too easy, but I just don't know what happened. Before I would just go up there pay some money for rentals and a lift ticket and just do it. Now it feels like I forgot how to ski! (SKIER level of 6 maybe. [b]Level 6 Ski open parallel turns on blue terrain)
o I ski in Massachusetts, Vermont, New Hampshire. I love groomed snow and will sell my lift ticket if the mountains are covered in ice. Only skied powder once.
* Talk about other skis
o I've never owned a pair of skis
o
o
o
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* I could use some help getting started.
post #4 of 10
Mikey, we have the exact same profile except that I've gained an unfortunate 10 pounds over you...

I learned to ski on 155s (that's what all the rental shops figured out for a beginner of my height since I'm 170cm tall at 5"7). When I made the switch to intermediate level, I got 160 and they were initially difficult to tackle, but after a while I got used to them and the skis I bought were 160s and I feel like I control them ok. I'm not sure why 160 feels too short for you.

I've tried 165 once at a demo and they felt a little overwhelming (they were also stronger skis); unless you're trying to race or if you're skiing out west, I don't see a benefit to going that high.

What I would recommend (based on my limited experience) is to buy a ski with a shorter turn radius. The places you tend to ski are crowded and east coast slopes are not wide enough. Quick shorter turn feel more "aggressive" in constrained spaces.
post #5 of 10
I cannot gather exactly what condition you were skiing in. In the East, hardpack and powdered covered days (unless only thin and dry) call for very different skill sets.

If you were skiing on hardpack or ice and you rented the 160cm, the edges might have been shot (typically of rental skis) -- causing you to be all over the place. Without a fresh tune, you had to work really hard to stay in control. And, no matter what it would have looked pretty.

If it was a powder day, it might have something to do with your technique.
post #6 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeyA View Post
Now I'm not sure if it's because I never skied on powder before or the skis were just way too big for me. I could use some help finding out what I should be using because I am planning on buying some skis, boots and bindings this year. I could definitely use some help from the experienced crowd around here. I hope some of you can help me decide which set up would be good for me to start out with.
Buy boots first; go back and see how you make out on those same 160s.
post #7 of 10
I'm about the same size and weight and relatively new to the sport. When I've rented, I've ranged from 150s to 170s. When on something from the 150-160 range is when I feel most comfortable. I'm thinking of buying skis in the very near future because I'm sick of paying rental fees. In the Midwest, is there an ideal type of ski to own?

Since I'm new, I really want a ski that lets me turn easy. Although, I've been having some fun in the terrain park and only see venturing more into it as my skills progress. Would it be crazy for a newbie to invest in a pair of twin tips?

Since I don't know much, I'd rather not walk into a local ski shop and be talked into something I don't want - but this could happen due to lack of knowledge. All in all, what does a beginner meets intermediate Midwest skier look for? Thanks for any feedback.
post #8 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by BetterThanAliens View Post
Since I don't know much, I'd rather not walk into a local ski shop and be talked into something I don't want - but this could happen due to lack of knowledge.
BTA, welcome!

A good ski shop can do you much more good than harm. More importantly, they can set you up with a good pair of boots to start with.

As for an idea for what to get, anything ranging from a forgiving all mountain freeride (like the Bandit series) to an all mountain twins would probably work for you.

IMHO for park skiing, unless you are doing the extreme stuff, it actually takes much more guts than skills once you get to the intermediate level.
post #9 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by chanwmr View Post

A good ski shop can do you much more good than harm. More importantly, they can set you up with a good pair of boots to start with.

As for an idea for what to get, anything ranging from a forgiving all mountain freeride (like the Bandit series) to an all mountain twins would probably work for you.

IMHO for park skiing, unless you are doing the extreme stuff, it actually takes much more guts than skills once you get to the intermediate level.
Everything you said is very true. Thanks for the advice on kind of ski! Maybe on Friday, I'll be getting this done. I picked up a pair of Agent 95s from Tecnica a few days ago. I used them yesterday and they're nice, but definitely need a few minor adjustments.
post #10 of 10
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the replies! I am heading out tomorrow with a pair of 150's and the mountain conditions say it's groomed and loose granular so I wont be skiing on powder.

I have decided to go with a pair of 150's because my shoulder is still banged up from last time I went. That and I also spoke to a man at the ski shop and he said I should not be skiing because of this and if I'm determined to go I should use a slower/shorter ski.

We talked for a bit and he said the ski size is mostly about weight and skill level. He also gave me a different style boot this time and said if I feel comfortable I should switch to 160's once I'm there. I know it will be another $36.oo for those mountain rentals, but he said it's a very cheap price to find out what size ski you want before I buy a pair.

I plan on purchasing a package deal from them or at least finding out what type of skis will work best for me. He also told me I should consider renting some demo skis when my shoulder feels good enough to ski a aggressive so I can see how they feel.

Not sure if I'm going to go this route or not because it kind of felt like he was just trying to suggest a cheap package deal for $350.oo when the boots alone start at $150.oo.

I guess I need to find a good ski shop in Massachusetts or New Hampshire. If any of you know one that will inform me well I would appreciate the info. Thanks again for the help!!!
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