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GS video for MA

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
Here's me running gates in Salla a few weeks ago. Any feedback much wellcome.

http://vimeo.com/2599860
post #2 of 10

Looking good.

The left turn looks a little stronger than the right. You balance etc looks very good. Ticky tacky...weight a bit more forward. Drive the hands down the hill. Open up the stance a bit.
post #3 of 10
Thread Starter 
Thanks Racer256, no excuse but the first left turn was tighter and on a steeper part of the slope. Then it opened up and flattened out.

I have been working on getting my hands forwards at the gate and apex but on this particular day I was working on levelling my shoulders and on angulation. In order to do this I was trying to bring my outsdie arm down and my inside arm up and not let my outside arm go up causing inclination, banking, inside ski weighting, outside ski pressure loss, hip rotation, decresing edge angles, skidding, loss of speed and slower times and lower rankings. Still you see my outside arm going up on the second left turn as I pass the camerawoman. I quickly bring it down as I remembered the task.

I have also tried to open up my stance a bit but thats a tough one. When I stand overly wide it barely looks like my feet are more apart than normally. I did cut down on my canting at the beginning of the season and I think that that is part of the problem as its not only the narrow stance but also the slight A-frame I resort to in order to keep my skis edging and causes that narrow stance. I could be wrong.

When I started to ski GS last year I was much more upright. I had never realized how far forward you need to lean with your upper body in order to be forward enough. The way I stand now is a big improvement but I need to go still forward. Thanks for pointing it out though.
post #4 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by tdk6 View Post
Thanks Racer256, no excuse but the first left turn was tighter and on a steeper part of the slope. Then it opened up and flattened out.

I have been working on getting my hands forwards at the gate and apex but on this particular day I was working on levelling my shoulders and on angulation. In order to do this I was trying to bring my outsdie arm down and my inside arm up and not let my outside arm go up causing inclination, banking, inside ski weighting, outside ski pressure loss, hip rotation, decresing edge angles, skidding, loss of speed and slower times and lower rankings. Still you see my outside arm going up on the second left turn as I pass the camerawoman. I quickly bring it down as I remembered the task.

I have also tried to open up my stance a bit but thats a tough one. When I stand overly wide it barely looks like my feet are more apart than normally. I did cut down on my canting at the beginning of the season and I think that that is part of the problem as its not only the narrow stance but also the slight A-frame I resort to in order to keep my skis edging and causes that narrow stance. I could be wrong.

When I started to ski GS last year I was much more upright. I had never realized how far forward you need to lean with your upper body in order to be forward enough. The way I stand now is a big improvement but I need to go still forward. Thanks for pointing it out though.
I actually thought your first turn was the best. In general, fine. Remember, style points don't count. What does the clock say? I just saw a video on Ultimate Sports of Carlo Janka's GS win at Val D'Isere, and I thought he was doing a lot of stuff that's a current no-no...I didn't see much angulation at all, I thought he was moving straight up and down on his skis, and a whole lot of other stuff. But he won. So while there's a couple of things I might say, I ain't gonna because the most important thing is...are you any faster than last year? If not, it doesn't matter. It's entirely possible to overthink this sport too much, or, as Edith Thys once said, "The dumber the better."

My teammates and I are spending a lot of time watching the 2008 Aspen Women's GS, where there was some incredible skiing, and one of the things we all say is "Wow, they're sooooo loose, especially in the hips and lower back...no wonder they go fast and make it look easy." Words to live by...
post #5 of 10
It looks good! Your balance looks stable and your line looks clean.

If you watch your skis, it looks like they're not really biting when you want them to. Here's why:

- Instead of moving forward through your transition, you move immediately onto your new edge without establishing your weight on the outside tip to generate a strong initiation.

- As you go through your turn, your skis don't really engage into the snow because they were not given the proper platform. You then drift through the turn, until your skis are across the fall line.

- One your skis are pointed across the fall line (which seems to be happening right after the gate), they then abruptly engage, digging in under all the momentum you have generated so far. It is for this reason you notice snow flying up right after the gate. Most of your actual direction change is happening here, with your skis across the fall line.

The result is a stopping motion at every turn. Instead of generating an early impulse when you want to, creating direction change while moving down the fall line, your impulse happens late, across the fall line, fighting gravity.

Here are ways to fix it.

- Focus on timing: planting your pole will help bring your weight forward dynamically through your transition. Make sure the plant happens as soon as you have completed your direction change (as you pass the gate) to allow yourself the longest time possible for a strong transition.

- When freeskiing, focus on long transitions that enable a weight transfer onto the tip of the new outside ski. Do not allow yourself to generate angles until you are strongly on your new outside ski. You should feel the power under the ball of your outside foot.

- Focus on moving your hips down the hill through your transition. Not generating angles during that platform building will avoid the tipping that you experience. Your arms can do whatever they want as long as your hips are moving down the hill.

- Once that platform is built, you no longer free fall inside because your skis are set. You can now move as inside as you would like to generate some serious power early in your turn, avoiding digging in across the fall line.

I hope this helps! Please let me know if you have any questions...
post #6 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by D(C) View Post
It looks good! Your balance looks stable and your line looks clean.

If you watch your skis, it looks like they're not really biting when you want them to. Here's why:

- Instead of moving forward through your transition, you move immediately onto your new edge without establishing your weight on the outside tip to generate a strong initiation.

- As you go through your turn, your skis don't really engage into the snow because they were not given the proper platform. You then drift through the turn, until your skis are across the fall line.

- One your skis are pointed across the fall line (which seems to be happening right after the gate), they then abruptly engage, digging in under all the momentum you have generated so far. It is for this reason you notice snow flying up right after the gate. Most of your actual direction change is happening here, with your skis across the fall line.

The result is a stopping motion at every turn. Instead of generating an early impulse when you want to, creating direction change while moving down the fall line, your impulse happens late, across the fall line, fighting gravity.

Here are ways to fix it.

- Focus on timing: planting your pole will help bring your weight forward dynamically through your transition. Make sure the plant happens as soon as you have completed your direction change (as you pass the gate) to allow yourself the longest time possible for a strong transition.

- When freeskiing, focus on long transitions that enable a weight transfer onto the tip of the new outside ski. Do not allow yourself to generate angles until you are strongly on your new outside ski. You should feel the power under the ball of your outside foot.

- Focus on moving your hips down the hill through your transition. Not generating angles during that platform building will avoid the tipping that you experience. Your arms can do whatever they want as long as your hips are moving down the hill.

- Once that platform is built, you no longer free fall inside because your skis are set. You can now move as inside as you would like to generate some serious power early in your turn, avoiding digging in across the fall line.

I hope this helps! Please let me know if you have any questions...
D(C) - excellent analysis and some great points to work on which I will use.

TDK6. Since I suffer from most of the same faults , I recognize your comments. (I still get picked up by my coaches for having skis too close together - i blame it on >30 years skiing straight skis). I make no claims to expertise and would not pretend to be in the same league as the others commenting but what I noticed was that you appeared to be riding the edge too long after you had completed the turn which then left you having to work really hard to initiate for the next gate. As per SR 55 the first turn looked good and you were generating good speed but you seemed to get later and alater after that
post #7 of 10

What D(C) said was good...

...and I agree, these are things we can all work on. See what I said, above, though. Go to Universal Sports, online, and watch the Men's GS from Val D'Isere. You'll see a wide variety of approaches to winning a GS run on the World Cup. Past a certain point, there is no right way or wrong way, only the fast way.

In my Masters program, we do the same thing...sit there after training and dissect the video. Sometimes, that isn't the right approach for me. I know what I felt, I know what worked and what didn't, and I'm not necessarily going to get any faster by micromanaging technique. One of my teammates says that he takes at least two runs a day where he doesn't think about technique at all, just tries to go fast and carry speed. Which sort of talks to a theory I have, which is that it's a really good idea, at least once a week, to put the SL and GS skis on the rack and get on something big, preferably a 201 Super G or longer. A great tool for widening the stance, too, because if your feet aren't apart on a big ski, ain't nothing going to happen.

One of the all purpose fix everything drills I learned in my L1 Coaching cert clinic is low offset turns on flat, rolling terrain in a high and low tuck. It'll teach you how to use as little edge and pressure as possible to get the job done, it'll quiet down your upper body, it will definitely widen your stance, and, most important, it'll teach you how to glide, which is how you get fast in ski racing.

Yes, even in SL and GS, too. Todd Brooker made a great point in a video sequence of one of the top women in the Aspen GS. Which is that while a lot of junior racers are so obsessed with carving turns that all they ever do is spend time in a turn, the top WC women know how to get a clean turn done, go back to neutral (weight even on both skis, tracking down the fall line) between turns so that they get to glide down the course, if only for a short moment. Try it, you'll like it...
post #8 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiRacer55 View Post
Yes, even in SL and GS, too. Todd Brooker made a great point in a video sequence of one of the top women in the Aspen GS. Which is that while a lot of junior racers are so obsessed with carving turns that all they ever do is spend time in a turn, the top WC women know how to get a clean turn done, go back to neutral (weight even on both skis, tracking down the fall line) between turns so that they get to glide down the course, if only for a short moment. Try it, you'll like it...
That's a great point, and brings up something I was going to say: what I see in the skiing is a bit of "park-and-ride" in the turns. I see you engage the edge and then just ride it, not working the turn to the next transition and taking advantage of the glide points. And on a flatter course, it's vital to glide where you can and milk whatever available speed is there.

I think that a good forward move will help, for sure, but also not rushing into the next turn: allowing the transition to happen more organically, with a glide phase. The aforementioned exercises from D(C) and SR55 will help with this, no doubt.

And as for the narrow stance coming from all the straight ski history, that's certainly possible. Though starting in 1987, my coaches were working on wider stances (similar to what is the common stance nowadays) on the straight skis, so.... there's something to be said for being ahead of the curve, I guess.

Definitely have the canting and alignment checked out, but the wider stance will help reduce the A-framing that seems to pop up in your turns. Also look into tipping the inside little toe as you turn, as that'll help drive the inside ski and will bring the inside shin into alignment - no more A-frame!

Good luck!
post #9 of 10
Thread Starter 
Thanks for all the feedback guys. Too much for me to comment on now since its christmas eve but I will get back to you later with more videos.

Merry christmas everyone,

Tom
post #10 of 10
Pretty good skiing. I would just try to keep my arms just a little more forward especially the inside arm on the second turn(Maybe it's the camera angle} and stay a little lower in the transition. The 1st turn was very good.
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