New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Praxis Powder

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
Me: 190lbs, Capricorn, Level 5 Dungeonmaster.

Skiis: 195 Praxis Powders mounted w/ Salomon 916's at 104.5 from tip. Please don't ask what edge bevels I use - I don't even know what that means.

Conditions: 12-14" blower turning to cut up turning to crud and some skier-compacted "hard-pack" or "packed powder" - whatever that's supposed to mean.

Review: It's like a party on my feet. In powder/3D snow there are no negatives. They will do anything a conventional ski will do, plus they will dump speed faster, change directions faster, accelerate faster and allow you to do all kinds of goofy fun stuff. Just try 'em.

Anybody who says these kind of skis are only good for super deep powder and are useless on any kind of packed-down snow has either: 1) never skied on these types of skis or 2) doesn't actually know how to ski. True - you won't be able to carve 10 billion ultra-short radius turns right under the chair to impress the two other guys in the world who think that's cool, but who cares? If you're not completely locked into your rigid hard-snow carving technique, they can actually be a lot of fun on packed snow. Sliding ass in a controlled manner is really rad. In fact, with these skis I actualy had fun in non-powder snow for the first time in well over a decade.. I wouldn't take them on true World Cup racecourse blue ice though. Then again, I wouldn't take anything on "snow" like that.
post #2 of 17
Thread Starter 
Actually - one negantive. The tails kinda get in the way when you have to "herring-bone" hike with your skis on. You get used to it - you just have to widen your stance, but still...
post #3 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jer View Post
Actually - one negantive. The tails kinda get in the way when you have to "herring-bone" hike with your skis on. You get used to it - you just have to widen your stance, but still...
I have heard that for skating and traverses the praxis shape sorts stinks because the skis tend to runaway from each other. That might suck at alta. Look forward to trying my 185s tomorrow.
post #4 of 17
I am not a fan of skating them. Every now and again I feel like I hit my stride with them, but yeah, they are weird to skate. And at least to me, they feel inefficient at best.

As I got used to them, I found them just fine for most traverses. But I don't claim to spend vast amounts of time on traverses....

All that said, you literally could not pay me to go back to a cambered skin on powder.
post #5 of 17
Thread Starter 
I noticed no difference skating. Though the one traverse I did with them was fairly short compared to the High T or something - I didn't really notice anything there either. On the contrary - I didn't have to wory about the tips hooking on the uphill track when I got lazy.

I was kinda apprehensive that these things would completely suck on non-powder snow and would make my ankles hurt on traverses, but my aprehension was completely unfounded. The only reverse/reverse myth I have yet to bust is the high-speed-going-straight thing.
post #6 of 17
After a day of skiing the praxis 185, I basically agree with Jer's review. Once I got the balance point dialed in we (the skis and I) were ripping some nice turns all over the place. PRaxis are sick skis, way more versatile than people claim. Will post more in a couple weeks once the better lines that the beav get well laid in so I can give a more thorough review of their capabilities.
post #7 of 17
How about the more typical conditions like crud and bumps?
post #8 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by ct55 View Post
How about the more typical conditions like crud and bumps?
crud thats 3dimensional? pretty ******* awesome. bumps while thats goes with out saying they do kinda of suck there, you ll get though but IMO its not fun
post #9 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post
bumps while thats goes with out saying they do kinda of suck there, you ll get though but IMO its not fun
have to agree with you there.

When i got my praxis mounted, i took them out on a day without fresh to get a feel for them.

To get to some terrain i really wanted to ski, i needed to cross a bump field. it is a good way to look like a dork under the lift.
post #10 of 17
I am actually a fan of them in soft spring bumps. But that is likely my perspective as a bump non-fan. I ski bumps to get where I want to go. So my mission in bumps is to get through them with the least hassle. These skis pivot like crazy and refuse to be hooky or catchy. So in soft spring conditions where you can get some purchase midfoot, you can be mellow as you want to be and work through some pretty big bumps. I thought the Praxis boards were the easiest thing going last spring when skiing International at Alpental - and well suited to the "funner" soft stuff past the bumps. OTOH, I'm pretty damn sure I would not enjoy taking them into icy bumps. Or icy <fill in your favorite terrain> for that matter.
post #11 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by spindrift View Post
I am actually a fan of them in soft spring bumps. But that is likely my perspective as a bump non-fan. I ski bumps to get where I want to go. So my mission in bumps is to get through them with the least hassle. These skis pivot like crazy and refuse to be hooky or catchy. So in soft spring conditions where you can get some purchase midfoot, you can be mellow as you want to be and work through some pretty big bumps. I thought the Praxis boards were the easiest thing going last spring when skiing International at Alpental - and well suited to the "funner" soft stuff past the bumps. OTOH, I'm pretty damn sure I would not enjoy taking them into icy bumps. Or icy <fill in your favorite terrain> for that matter.
not matter the bumps unless they were covered with lots of snow they suck.

I want a pair as soon as I get out of Pa...but you will never see me rave about their bump performance.

FYI unlike you unless there is powder to be skied I ski bumps.
post #12 of 17
Honestly, PRaxis are somewhere towards the bottom of what I would want on a real bump run...
post #13 of 17
Jer, did you consider the Protest?
post #14 of 17
Just so we're clear - I'm talking about Utah bumps, not ice moguls like we get here!

Those things have a hollower sound and a softer feel - you can get an edge in and scrape turns on them if you get in the right rhythm
post #15 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by WILDCAT View Post
Jer, did you consider the Protest?
Yeah, but these were $400.

IMO - the Powders are plenty versatile. After skiing these now for a few days, I really think having a little camber and sidecut underfoot is just hedging your bet. If you want soft snow performance, go all in. Don't believe the reverse/reverse horror stories. These things have been a blast on everything I've skied thusfar.

From what I've experienced the past four years with Sanouks and now these, I don't ever plan on buying a ski with camber or a sub 40m turn radius ever again.
post #16 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jer View Post
Yeah, but these were $400.

IMO - the Powders are plenty versatile. After skiing these now for a few days, I really think having a little camber and sidecut underfoot is just hedging your bet. If you want soft snow performance, go all in. Don't believe the reverse/reverse horror stories. These things have been a blast on everything I've skied thusfar.

From what I've experienced the past four years with Sanouks and now these, I don't ever plan on buying a ski with camber or a sub 40m turn radius ever again.
Hopefully I can get a on a pair of Praxis this spring. Several friends have them as their deep-snow ski, but they all have bigger boots than I.

Ski choice depends so much the skier and the locale. I got my friend a pair of Huge Troubles, as he was coming off of Sanouks and wanted something more versatile. A very good skier, 40+ days a year. He loved the Sanouks for the first runs of the day and didn't care for them the rest of the time. His view of the Huge Trouble was "not as good in the deepest uncut snow, but far superior in everything else, much better resort ski". I found the same when comparing the Huge Trouble to the Hellbent, for example, and I place a premium on versatility and crudbusting performance, as that is what I am skiing after 10:30am. I like skis that are powerful and stable, similar to a race ski, and don't care for the soft flex of most of the truly deep snow skis. The HT provides exactly that, and is still superb in the first 3 runs of the day that are untracked. These are probably the most fun skis imaginable, given that I have the snow to go with them!
post #17 of 17
Thread Starter 

I'd also like to comment on how tough the bases are on these skis. Keith must have impregnated the Ptex with diamonds or something. A few days ago I hit a small blind roller at Silverton. Turns out the backside of the roller was jagged talus. Long story short I almost made it. Spectacular tomahawk - thought for sure I'd have a nice gaping core-shot. Just a few minor gouges. Very very tough bases.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Member Gear Reviews