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Do I update or reuse old gear??

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 
I need some help with updating my skis. I have some old skis from like 1995. I've only used them about 4 times and feel guilty about just tossing them in the trash. They are straight skis, and I would hope I could update these first but then use my old boots and bindings--if that is even possible.

I went to my local ski shop and tried on some nice new boots but at $300, this is a hobby I can pretty much afford to update one thing at a time.

So basically, what I'm wondering is stuff this old outdated to the point where I'd be better off just renting skis? Or, would it be a good idea to milk one more year out of this old stuff while I become a better skier, and then get new bindings and boots?

Any suggestions or tips would be appreciated. By the way the antique equipment are as follows: skis are Rossignol VC2, bindings Rossignol FD 7, and boots Rossignol R725. I can post pics if that helps.

Cheers,
Mike
post #2 of 20
Time to upgrade. Period.

Even if its is just getting set up in new boots and renting/demoing skis.
post #3 of 20
Yeah, that stuff is ancient. Don't feel obligated to use them; you'd be much better off on newer equipment.
post #4 of 20
Lift tickets are expensive enough. Don't waste them on skiing antiques, unless you are already a good enough skier to make them work well.
post #5 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by mikeg19_82 View Post
Or, would it be a good idea to milk one more year out of this old stuff while I become a better skier, and then get new bindings and boots?
Unless you're super talented, you won't become a better skier with these skis in a year.

Either rent or get yourself a pair of used one if you want to go cheap for now.
post #6 of 20
Thread Starter 
Thanks. I'm going to Summit County, SLC, or Tahoe in January (they can't decide) and I want to ski better than I did last year at Copper and Keystone. I appreciate the advice and will not even bother using my outdated equipment. Anyone hear of the Salomon Mission 6 boot? That one felt comfortable.
post #7 of 20
the mission 6 is going to be too soft. and if it was comfortable out of the box, it was likely too big. search this board for "shell fit" for an explanation of how boots should fit. don't worry about them being too tight out of the box, if you go to a decent shop with a decent bootfitter they can help you find the right boot and customize the fit for you. don't skimp on boots. look at salomon's website to see how the mission 6 fits into their lineup. http://www.salomonsports.com/us/#/ski/boots. hint: "comfort" = junk.
post #8 of 20
You need to find a boot fitter and you need to find one relatively close to where you live. It's better if you can find a good shop that isn't hundreds of miles away; you don't want to neglect going back a few times for tweaking the fit. Boots often need to be adjusted considerably, but you want to have a little break in on the liners before you do, otherwise they could end up being stretched too much.
post #9 of 20
Use your old skis for tomato stakes. Use the old bindings for duck decoy anchors.

Boots are most important. The advice above is good. Some shops have decent rental boots, other shops have boots with way too little support. Find any mid-level rental skis or buy some decent used skis & bindings, and you'll ski much better.
post #10 of 20
Thread Starter 
What do you all think of 05-06 Lange Comp 100 boots? They fit nicely. I can get them for $250 new. Is this a good boot? I tried to search but didn't find much about them.
post #11 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by mikeg19_82 View Post
What do you all think of 05-06 Lange Comp 100 boots? They fit nicely. I can get them for $250 new. Is this a good boot? I tried to search but didn't find much about them.
Supposedly the Comp 100 is a race inspired boot that is made for advanced to expert lighter skier. Also Lange is known for its snug fit, which is conceived as tight or restricting for most recreational/novice skiers.

Given that, if you like the fit, you can flex them efficiently (you are somewhat athletic) and are willing to work a bit harder, they could be a good choice for you. Of course, without telling us anything about your size, age, skill level and the type of skiing you do, we can only make certain assumptions.
post #12 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by mikeg19_82 View Post
What do you all think of 05-06 Lange Comp 100 boots? They fit nicely. I can get them for $250 new. Is this a good boot? I tried to search but didn't find much about them.
i have a pair of those. they are a nice boot but a little on the soft side. how much do you weigh? if you're over 150 lbs or so, you might want to consider the comp 120 (now wc 120) instead. you can probably find that for the same price on the internets. the older models are the same last as the comp 100, but they changed to a new one when they changed the name to world cup 120, so if you like the fit of the 100, try to find an older pair. i paid $70 on ebay for the comp 100.
post #13 of 20
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by chanwmr View Post
Of course, without telling us anything about your size, age, skill level and the type of skiing you do, we can only make certain assumptions.
Size: 6'2" 195lb, good athletic ability, though not "fit"
Age: 26
Skill level: Transitioning to blue slopes at copper mountain with my old straight skis
Type of skiing: Groomed trails, but I want to eventually do some powder skiing on the trails only accessible by snowcat. But here in Milwaukee, I'll be able to access only groomed trails.

I understand now Comp 100 boots are intended for experts, but I need boots to last a few years. Would the 2007 Lange Fluid 80 be decent for someone to develop into?? I can get them in my size for $150.
post #14 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by mikeg19_82 View Post
Size: 6'2" 195lb, good athletic ability, though not "fit"
go with the comp 120 if you can.
post #15 of 20
Thread Starter 
They only have the Comp 100 at the ski shop I went to and Ebay doesn't have it in size 28.
post #16 of 20
Post like this hurt my eyes. Argggggggggggggggggggggg!

What you need to do is evaluate exactly how you will be using gear and then ....

Don't think in terms of rent, think of leasing higher end gear from a good shop if you are going on a week long "holilday" and that it only going to be every year or so.

We aren't cut from the same bolt of cloth and folks here tend to be die hards and gear whores. Tune some of that out.

Find an "upscale" shop where you will be and treat yourself to some good stuff .... and ask about the pirce of rental applying toward purchase if you are real happy.
post #17 of 20
Thread Starter 
Renting is what I plan to do, but I will ski in Wisconsin too, so it's a very expensive option. I basically just want some nice boots now and I will demo skis out in Colorado. When I get back home I plan to buy skis. Here, have some eye drops
post #18 of 20
You have a solid plan Mike Getting your properly fitting boots first is ,by far , your smartest purchase as it is the most important.


Read the boot fitting information posted by Mtnlion and others regarding initial fitting and choosing a boot for your best chances to nail down a good purchase.

Boots first , then explore some ski shapes.
post #19 of 20
If your boots are good ones and they fit, then there is no good reason to trash them. A newer model might be a little comfier and a little lighter, but if it holds your foot like a vice and transfers every little movement of your feet and ankles to the ski then spending money on new boots isn't going to buy you anything. If your boots do not do these things - get new ones immediately. Otherwise, spend your dollars on skis. Ski shops have a list of bindings that they are no longer able to use so bring you old ones in and use them if you can.

Many people on this forum spend more than is necessary to enjoy skiing, or even to become an expert skier. That is fine, they enjoy their gear. They are knowledgeable about it. Some of them are even very good skiers. Just don't let them sell you on something you don't need. Spend your money on lift tickets and airfares instead.
post #20 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by mikeg19_82 View Post
Renting is what I plan to do, but I will ski in Wisconsin too, so it's a very expensive option. I basically just want some nice boots now and I will demo skis out in Colorado. When I get back home I plan to buy skis. Here, have some eye drops
I agree with the general advice. Step one: find someone who can get you in the right boots. Don't get too hung up on specific models; it needs to fit you properly, and you should be able to flex it (but not be crushing it every time you lean forwards).

Once you have proper boots, rent/demo skis for a while until you find something you like. You can save a lot of money on skis by buying used gear, or looking for closeouts at the end of the season.
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