New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Better base repairs?

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
Just picked up a can of Swix base cleaner, and was just figuring out the physics of this whole thing. My end purpose is to make for a better base repair, and by better I mean more durable (which has been hit or miss for me). My thinking is that if I spray or wipe cleaner onto the base with the bases facing up, I will only be driving the dirt and or wax deeper into the bases which will interfere with the adhesion of my ptex.....I think? (I have read that ptex repair rods have wax in them.....I dont know if this is true or not.)

So what if I place the skis on my vises, base down and spray from below so that it drips, wont this at least help the wax drip out, or at least propagate it to the pore mouths? Then I could wipe what's left and hopefully have a cleaner base so that my repairs will adhere better. Thoughts?
post #2 of 9

If there's actually dirt...

...or some kind of other doo doo in the actual gouge in the base, you definitely need to use base cleaner, and I like Swix Orange. I don't think it makes much difference whether the ski is upside down or not. After cleaning it, ya gotta let it dry, however. If your divot replacements aren't adhering, that'll happen with core shots (which I leave to the pros) or if the base isn't warm...I use a propane torch, and heat the base slightly before dripping in the Ptex. Also...well, consider the following:

http://www.rmmskiracing.org/articles...ning-Part2.pdf
post #3 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richie-Rich View Post
Just picked up a can of Swix base cleaner, and was just figuring out the physics of this whole thing. My end purpose is to make for a better base repair, and by better I mean more durable (which has been hit or miss for me). My thinking is that if I spray or wipe cleaner onto the base with the bases facing up, I will only be driving the dirt and or wax deeper into the bases which will interfere with the adhesion of my ptex.....I think?
Have you thought of wet-brushing the bases with the cleaner on them, using brass brush or fiber pad?

The idea behind cleaner is to suspend dirt and dissolve wax.

If your "dirt" is fine enough to be actually driven into the interstices of a sintered base, you may as well call it "lubricant", it's probably finer than talcum powder.

That said, I clean with acetone after cleaning with base cleaner.


Quote:
(I have read that ptex repair rods have wax in them.....I dont know if this is true or not.)
The thin easy-flame ones do. The big chunky 11mm ones generally don't, those are for guns.
post #4 of 9
Ah, interstices. Nice word selection.


interstice |inˈtərstis|
noun (usu. interstices)
an intervening space, esp. a very small one : sunshine filtered through the interstices of the arching trees.
ORIGIN late Middle English : from Latin interstitium, from intersistere ‘stand between,’ from inter- ‘between’ + sistere ‘to stand.’


You're thinking too hard RR. Just wipe the area with cleaner and let it dry. It will be dry as a bone afterwards.

I don't think the ptex repair will really get into the interstices of the sintered base in a significant manner, so I wouldn't worry about the microscopic dirt / wax / etc that's down there. The molten ptex is just too thick to flow at that level.
post #5 of 9
For a more durable repair clean the base let dry. Prior to appling the P-tex roughen up the affected area with a small steel bristel brush, apply some heat from your torch/ heat gun first, and then apply P-tex.
post #6 of 9
i don't use base cleaner at all - i find that stuff leaves a residue that interrupts the bond of ptex. i prefer to spot sand the area with 150 grit, this is important as it gives the repair a rough surface for the ptex to bond to, blow it out with compressed air, heat it, weld it(in your case you can candle ptex it) then immediately press it with a sun valley ptex roller thingy(in place of it you can use any thick aluminum or steel the size of a scraper, this facilitates a quick cooling, and squishes the ptex into the repair area). but the key i think is the removal of the excess ptex - and i use a burrless body file (aka panzer or radial) very carefully and shave off excess until flat. a light sand with 320 grit and a grind if necessary.

your common candle ptex has wax in it to help it burn, but there are also harder versions available as well like "metal grip" which is a really hard candle type ptex. for weld guns(usually expensive but there are some inexpensive glue gun types which i can't comment on) there are soft and hard versions of ptex with soft versions being easily workable, but hard versions that have longevity. hot air welders are the bomb fer sure but too expensive for the home tuner as well. have fun
post #7 of 9
Hey RR, do you have a soldering iron? Try using it with the ptex and warm base. Get the gouges roughed up and clean, like any paint job, but don't get too hung up on it.
post #8 of 9
Thread Starter 
Yes I tried the soldering iron technique to repair a core shot after reading your writeup whileback, it has held, but for scratches that are not so deep, I think that I would be causing more harm than good going this route.
post #9 of 9
Are the scratches performance or cosmetic issues? It's certainly possible to botch repairs with an iron or a propane torch, but the welds using welding material (ribbon (best), rods or wire) without wax, work better that dripping ptex. However, people have posted good results welding ptex sticks (with wax) using a soldering iron (400 degrees F or so).
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Tuning, Maintenance and Repairs