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what do adjust on new ski boots

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
Hi everyone,

I just bought a pair of lange fluid FR 80 ski boots. What do I need to do to see if adjustments need to be made, and how do I make these adjustments? These are replacing my 8 year old Noridcas and therefore, I am rather unfamiliar with ski boots. They fit great, but I'm sure something needs to be adjusted... cant, etc...

Or if there is a informative site someone can point me to, that would also be great.

Thanks!
post #2 of 15
Hi zeppman,

I would have to recommend you find a local bootfitter from those listed at the top of "Ask the boot guy's" area as it is almost impossible to asses canting needs Will standing in the boots. It turns out that fore/aft balance position is as important as canting needs and should be assessed by someone familiar with looking at it.

By the way if the boot fits great out of the box it is probably to large, have some one shell fit you to determine which size would work best for you.
post #3 of 15
what was said:

boot fitting is problem solving: some problems like boots too big a boot fitter can see right away without you sking the boots. Some things are more personal to the skier and will not show up until you ski the boots.

if you think they are the right size, go ski em.

if you want something like canting adjusted or a double check on size, then go see a boot fitter.

also reading the FAQ will inform you a lot too
post #4 of 15
Thread Starter 
Thanks guys.

I was actually fitted by a boot fitter for these boots, but he was selling them for $500. I went home, found them online on sale everywhere for $300... even the lange.com website had them at that price. I called the store and asked if they would negotiate a little on the price, because I was happy with their service...even $100 off. But they would not budge. I could not justify spending $200 extra for their services, so I purchased them online. I'm fairly certain I have the right size boot. I guess I will just ski them and see what happens?

and yes, I meant to write "what to" instead of "what do" in my thread title.. sorry.
post #5 of 15
Maybe there's service value in the the price delta that you won't find online....?
post #6 of 15
Thread Starter 
I would of happily paid around $100 more for the boots + tax for the services, but I'm sorry, in these times and economy, I was not willing to spend the additional $200 plus tax. I called, and offered to negotiate, explained the situation said, "how about $400". They said no, I took my business elsewhere. When almost every website, including the company's corporate site has the boot listed for $300, I'm not going to pay $500.
post #7 of 15
[quote=zeppman;1019864]Thanks guys.

I was actually fitted by a boot fitter for these boots, but he was selling them for $500.

Hi Again,

This is no reflection on the shop you mentioned, but did the "boot fitter" shell size you in the boot model (in the shop) that you eventually purchased on the web? This process is described in the sticky found at the top of "Ask the boot guy's". Something like 90 percent of the folks who have purchased boots, bought them to big---shell sizing is the only way to go.

miketsc
Cped/master bootfitter
post #8 of 15
Thread Starter 
Hi Mike,

Sorry I missed your question from before. Yes, he did "shell fit" the boot. He also measured my foot's length, width, we went through a few boots and sizes, had me flex forward and do some other things. The boots that are being replaced are actually 1 full size too big on the mondo scale... due to the guy I bought the old boots from 7, 8 years ago not knowing how to fit boots. I'm coming from a 29.5 to a 28.5. The store I went to (I would rather not mention names due to the situation.. they really are a good store and the guy seemed very knowledgeable, I just couldn't justify overpaying by $200) is actually listed on the list of the boot fitter sticky. I'm not sure if the guy that fitted me was the actual fitter, but he seemed to know a lot more than the guys at the other stores I visited that week.
post #9 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by zeppman View Post
I would of happily paid around $100 more for the boots + tax for the services, but I'm sorry, in these times and economy, I was not willing to spend the additional $200 plus tax. I called, and offered to negotiate, explained the situation said, "how about $400". They said no, I took my business elsewhere. When almost every website, including the company's corporate site has the boot listed for $300, I'm not going to pay $500.
I hear you - and I agree that $200 is excessive - but consider that the guy helped you select the right size and provided value in doing so. What else could he have done for you? How much is your time worth now that you have to spend time sorting it out on your own?

You've bought online and are asking for free advice from guys who do this for a living. At some point in time there's going to be an economic disconnect. Advice and experience are not free. Personally I'm going to stop answering this kind of query since it encourages this type of behaviour. In short we're feeding the bears and cutting our own necks.

Please understand that I'm mean no personal disrespect since it's clear you made a reasonable attempt to negotiate .
post #10 of 15
Thread Starter 
jdistefa, I agree with you 100%. Thats why I didn't have a problem with paying $100 or so more. It was only about 20-30 min. of his time ($400/ hr for boot fitting?) I figured even if I went to an expert now he wouldn't charge me $200... but I guess I could be wrong. I do my best to buy from local brick and mortar stores, but $200 was a little much.

one other thing is that in my area, since there are no real mountains to ski, ski shops seem like more of a place for the elite to shop, while others go to your Sports Authority type places. When I walk into ski shops in the east, or colorado (never been to utah), they don't seem nearly as snobby as they do around here. It is hard to find someone who is knowledgeable and won't give you attitude if you aren't looking at their most expensive skis/boots. Just my opinion, I'm sure not everyone feels this way.

So that's why I bought online. I would gladly give someone a couple of bucks to help set up my boots, but not $200.
post #11 of 15
Do something nice for the guy that set you up with a fitting so you ended up with the right product. We'll all feel better about it.

Tis the season ya know.
post #12 of 15
At my shop, heat molding, cuff adjustment, ect and a basic stance assessment are INCLUDED in boots purchased from me, along with any grinding/punching/stretching that may be needed for up to two years after the purchase. These things all have a monetary value attached to them. If has no or little value to a costumer/consumer, then I guess there is nothing I can do about it. It just seems that lately people are are putting less and less value into actual service by people who know what they are doing, such is life I guess. I will say this, $200 can be eaten up really fast on a boot not purchased from me...
post #13 of 15
Thread Starter 
Cirque rider, stopped by this afternoon, bought a pair of socks, found the guy and gave him a tip.
post #14 of 15
well done zeppman. I think the carma is closer to even.....
post #15 of 15
I agree with these guys and like your last touch. I will add though that you will find if these new internet boots need any work at all you will quickly be ahead of the game if you had bought them from a shop.

Lou
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