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Bowflex Power Pro - Page 2

post #31 of 51
Thread Starter 
I wish I could delete post #27. I'm snarky today and just want to kill. That post was NOT directed at anyone here: I was thinking of my EX. Ack.
post #32 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bonni View Post
I'm 54 years old and I don't want to TRAIN like a 20-something.
52 and eat 20 somehtings for breakfast
post #33 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by comprex View Post
You can't. You have to do moderate intensity more often.

Most of the over-40 set here know that.
you can ,and Paul will agree, most workouts don't come close to the intensity that you are capable of.
post #34 of 51
Too bad we don't have a BEGINNERS fitness section.

what ya'all are sayin is probably accurate and all---but you are trying to do the equavilent of trying to get a newbie wedger to do perfect inside leg extension transitions on a 55 degree slope on day one of their skiing carreer.....

lets lighten up some here can we??
post #35 of 51
Bonni,

Maybe you could (or your hubby could) hire a personal trainer who is familiar with your bowflex. Probably several sessions. First to show you how the machine works, answer your questions, etc. Next to set up a routine for you -- if there are certain exercises that use the same machine settings, those would be logical to group together in a mini-workout session -- figure how many times to do each exercise, how many times a week you should try to complete each mini-workout, etc. Finally, even after you have a nice routine that fits your schedule and your goals, it would be helpful to have someone watch you doing the exercises -- make sure your form is good, help you focus on the muscles you are trying to develop. Also, when your workout starts seeming easy, a trainer can help you change up your exercises, just a little, so that you continue to make progress and don't get bored.

I've seen big improvements since starting to work out with a trainer, and it's not because I didn't push myself before. It's because I work out a lot smarter now.

Finally, have you read Younger Next Year? My husband and I read it at the beginning of this year, and it really motivated us to start working out, eating reasonably etc. It also is a great reminder that results aren't immediate -- keep plugging away even when you can't see any good feedback -- we're looking to be younger (healthier) next year, not next month or next week.

Good luck to you -- after following your travails and saying lots of prayers for you (even though you don't have a clue who I am), I'm so glad that you're doing better. Take care!

DEP
post #36 of 51
Thread Starter 
Thanks, DEP.

I'm not doing all that much better, but more adapting, I think.

I can't afford a personal trainer. Jeff and I will start really working when we get the dvd set up so we can watch and move along with it. It came with a 20 minute VHS tape.......no good.

I'm sure we'll be fine. Like Jeff said, we're beginning this, and it will be ok. If this helps, when I was 34, I went to a gym for 2 years twice a week and did weights for half an hour while waiting for my friend to get there after work, then played raquetball for an hour. I lost weight, settled in at 132 and was toned and strong. I can do this again and I know what to do.

I've been athletic my whole life until lately. I've been on softball and volleyball teams, bowling leagues and even played tournament darts. I like badminton and horseshoes. I can water ski. I've raced go-karts and cars. Only lately have I been complacent, and that's because of a broken leg, depression and pain. Since 2001, when I first started having foot issues/surgeries, it's been all downhill.

I'll get it back. I have no doubt.
post #37 of 51
I wouldn't worry about not being able to afford a personal trainer, most of them I see at the gym I go to aren't very good. If you want a DVD workout program to follow, I'd recommend P90X. Good luck!
post #38 of 51
Thread Starter 
The dvd arrived and it was nothing but an Advertisement for Blowflex! Into the trash it went.

I went online and found the manual for our machine and printed it out and put it in a notebook. I marked routines to do, following the manual. Jeff and I are doing this together. I already feel stronger.

We are also doing the stretches and exercises together that I've been given in PT. Overall, over the last 2 weeks, with skiing inclued, it's been quite a workout. I need some cardio though.....that's my lacking area now.

I drink more, and add a little lemon juice to ice water (Bowflex advised to hydrate using ice water because it uses energy to warm up the cold water you drink, burning more calories. I buy that because I like cold water). We've added WAY more vegetables in our diet. Next step: smaller portions. Baby steps.

I've not lost weight, but I've lost some inches in my waist and legs. It's not something you can physically see, but I can feel it in my clothes. They're not as tight.

It's going to be a journey. I'm looking forward to it. We're entirely too fat and out of shape.
Skiing tonight. Now, if only that headache would quit.
post #39 of 51
Be very careful drinking cold water or ice water with a warmed up body core. Smooth muscle cramping is NOT fun.
post #40 of 51
Thread Starter 
You need muscles to cramp before that happens.

I don't gulp. I sip. All day.
post #41 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bonni View Post
You need muscles to cramp before that happens.

Hmm, guess I have highly trained intestine muscles then.

I blame all that eating at Thanksgiving, Christmas and all; they've never been in this sort of shape before.

Quote:
I don't gulp. I sip. All day.
All those sips need to add up.

If I sipped I'd have -no- chance of getting the 800-1400 ml per hour I need to stay hydrated, nor any breath to continue exercising.
post #42 of 51
Thread Starter 
I do ok. According to my doctors, I'm well hydrated. That's all that counts.

YOU, dear PJ, lose more water in an hour just sitting there than I do all Week! I've never been a heavy sweater.
post #43 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bonni View Post
I've never been a heavy sweater.
...and she doesn't own one either
post #44 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by skier_j View Post
Too bad we don't have a BEGINNERS fitness section.

what ya'all are sayin is probably accurate and all---but you are trying to do the equavilent of trying to get a newbie wedger to do perfect inside leg extension transitions on a 55 degree slope on day one of their skiing carreer.....

lets lighten up some here can we??
Exactly!

Quote:
Finally, have you read Younger Next Year? My husband and I read it at the beginning of this year, and it really motivated us to start working out, eating reasonably etc. It also is a great reminder that results aren't immediate -- keep plugging away even when you can't see any good feedback -- we're looking to be younger (healthier) next year, not next month or next week.
Great book! The authors are great guys.

In two weeks, I'll be working part time for Healthstyles. Part of my job will be doing personal training on their equipment. If I find some interesting things to do on Bowflex, I'll drop you an email.
post #45 of 51
Thread Starter 
You're a true gem, LM! Thanks for thinking of us.

We've really gone to hell the last 2 years, and it's been stressful. Hopefully, we can get back on target. It will take time to break old habits.
post #46 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by skier_j View Post
Too bad we don't have a BEGINNERS fitness section.

what ya'all are sayin is probably accurate and all---but you are trying to do the equavilent of trying to get a newbie wedger to do perfect inside leg extension transitions on a 55 degree slope on day one of their skiing carreer.....

lets lighten up some here can we??
Sorry to drag this up since it's an old post, but I just wanted to make another point about intensity and training in general. Age is definitely a challenge as is coming from a inactive lifestyle. I'll use my dad as an example, he was pretty fit in his younger days, played lots of sports etc. In his 30's (after the kids were born) and 40's/early 50's he let himself go due to intense pressure work, providing for the family etc. He's 5'9 and went from about 170 to 215lbs and was totally inactive other than skiing a few days a year and maybe some pick-up hockey now and then.

After changing to a less time demanding job, he decided he was going to get fit and commited to it. He improved his diet (not totally clean but better) and started training seriously at his health club at age 52 (combination of weightlifting, 'boot camp' style training similar to CrossFit but not as good, running, biking/spinc lass etc). After 2 years he was back down to 170 and started competing in 10km/half-marathons and in recent years triathalons, his long term goal is to complete an Ironman. He looks 'ripped' (better than I do with my shirt off which is embarassing) and his energy levels are way better than before. The key for him was setting goals and being serious about training, it was a lot of hard work but it paid off.

This isn't really directed at anyone, but I guess my point is just that fitness isn't something you can kind of dabble in, if you want to see results you have to work hard, REALLY hard, but you WILL see real results that will improve your life, and it is worth the suffering, and age/inexperience are just barriers you can overcome. When I see people in jeans sitting on the bike at the gym reading a magazine casually pedaling I just ask myself why bother, you may as well just sit at home, without intensity there is no point. You don't have to push yourself to the point of barfing every day but it has to be hard. It was really motivating to me to see him do it as I was following down his path, 5'10 about 165 end of highschool, up to 220lbs by end of university totally inactive, last year started weightlifting/running then recently and lost about 20lbs but gained a lot of muscle. My only regret is I wish I had started training when I was in highschool, it would have been motivating if my parents had been active in fitness at that point in my life, something I hope to mentor my kids in down the road.
post #47 of 51
Thread Starter 
I guess I just won't bother then. Thanks.
post #48 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by gramboh View Post

This isn't really directed at anyone, but I guess my point is just that fitness isn't something you can kind of dabble in, if you want to see results you have to work hard, REALLY hard, but you WILL see real results that will improve your life, and it is worth the suffering, and age/inexperience are just barriers you can overcome.
I'll apologize ahead of time but I don't think I've read anything here that I disagree with more. If you want to be on the cover of a magazine or your paycheck is based on your physical performance, than working out needs to become part of your life/focus.

I have a friend that lost 60# by walking 5 miles each night and watching what he ate. Did it without a trainer or going into a gym. I won't disagree that having a trainer and going to a gym wouldn't have sped up the process or gotten him to 75#, but a 60# weight loss is a significant result.

Most folks, right or wrong, just want to fit in their jeans better. In the last two months I've lost 15# and fit in clothes I haven't been able to wear for two years. Could have lost 20-25 with a trainer and gym, but I did it without and produced a result that others notice "Honey, where's your gut." "Mom, is dad having an affair?"

I just got tired of having a pot belly and decided to get rid of it. If I drop another 10 #'s I'll be tickled pink.

Hat's off to your dad for having the drive, dicipline and ambition to achieve the results he did. It is honestly impressive.

Dabbling in it should be encouraged because most folks don't have the drive your father does. When making a lifestyle change, it is best to do it in baby steps. It took me 10 years to get in the worst shape of my life (30# over weight) and it happened gradually. I shouldn't take 10 years to loose it but so what if it takes 6-8 months. Much better chance of me sticking with it and not falling back if I haven't "bitten off more than I can chew" (couldn't resist the pun).

The medical community states that a 30 minute walk will ADD 2 hours to your life. I guess that's true but it would come under dabbling.

Your statements are true in that better results will be obtained if you don't "dabble", but good, solid results CAN be obtained by dabbling.

And for the record, my daughter has a picture of me on the staionary bike while I was nursing my knee after surgery; beer in the cup holder and I'm eating a bowl of ice cream. Not the prefered method but the intent was to exercise my knee. My goal wasn't to loose weight (at the time). I achieved those results and have been complimented by my OS, Chiro, and PT on how well my knee is doing.
post #49 of 51
L&AirC, well said.

At my local gym, I, a confirmed fitness-dabbler, recently saw a woman my age there with her mom and dad. She got them started on treadmills, then hopped on one next to them. Mom was sporting street clothes, and a ball cap to cover her pony-tailed hair. Dad had a snappy-looking vest, turtleneck, and casual slacks. Both had sturdy-looking walking shoes, and Mom launched into a jog while Dad walked. Not sure how long they treadmilled, but they were still out in the weight-lifting area when I left, at least 45 minutes later.

“Without intensity, there is no point.” I say, get up, get moving, and you’re already ahead of the game. But what do I know, I’m just a dabbler.
post #50 of 51
Quote:
I'll apologize ahead of time but I don't think I've read anything here that I disagree with more
Especially since he just took a 54 year old woman with MS who was getting excited about starting a fitness program and basically discouraged her from doing so. Great job!

Quote:
When I see people in jeans sitting on the bike at the gym reading a magazine casually pedaling I just ask myself why bother, you may as well just sit at home, without intensity there is no point
That's like saying that if you're not "doing" bumps and double blacks there's no point to skiing. Some of those people may be recovering from heart surgery.

Quote:
I guess I just won't bother then. Thanks.
You know I won't let you get away with that!
post #51 of 51
Thread Starter 
LM, you know me better than that. I won't one opinion sway me from what I think is beneficial.

However, I was told by my physical therapist today to take a 2 week break and Lay Low and do the minimum. I've been doing too much and as a result, I have right leg shin pain, left knee pain, and I'll be slowing down or NOT skiing at Jackson Hole for the Gathering. DANG!
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