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Hiking Up, Skiing Down?

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
Anyone know if it is legal to hike up a mountain and ski down as a way to both stay fit and avoid paying for a pricey lift ticket?

I ski at Mount Snow in Vermont, which is the area I'm most curious about, but info in general would be good too.

Thanks much!
post #2 of 15
It depends.

Sorry for the short answer but it varies from mountain to mountain. Most ski areas will not allow it during operating hours but will often allow hiking off hours.
post #3 of 15
From what I have been told, depends on the resort some are built on public lands, (Forest Service) and the resort owns the lifts, not the ground so hiking is OK. However, I have also been told that they control operations within the leased ground so they can limit/prohibit you from hiking up.
post #4 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Farmguy View Post
From what I have been told, depends on the resort some are built on public lands, (Forest Service) and the resort owns the lifts, not the ground so hiking is OK. However, I have also been told that they control operations within the leased ground so they can limit/prohibit you from hiking up.
This is the case at most resorts. The only place I know of that allows it during operating hours is Snow King. It can be dangerous to be hiking up a ski hill. You become a target for the downhillers during operating hours and you may be exposed to control work before the mountain opens.
post #5 of 15
I just hiked killington's superstar last friday when they shut down due to power outages.

We informed some of the workers that we were hiking and even saw other workers out there. No one stopped us. But then again the mountain was closed.
post #6 of 15
I ran into this TGR thread a little while back and was able to track it down. No info specifically for Mt Snow, but may still be helpful...

http://www.tetongravity.com/forums/s...ad.php?t=82945
post #7 of 15
Chances are "NO" if it's private property, but you can always ask (some places will let you do it). If it's on USFS land, I think it gets into a gray area, but there is likely a window of time where you can definitely do it.
post #8 of 15
You still have to buy a ticket to get you to the top where lift service stops, then you hike. It is a tradition in Taos - Hiking the Ridge. Here is an article for you: http://travel.nytimes.com/2006/03/05/travel/05taos.html
post #9 of 15
I just want to add that just because a ski resort is on "public" land most definitely does not mean that anything goes.

If it's on National Forest land (most common here in the West) the ski resort is operated under a special use permit. For almost all legal purposes, this permit gives the operator the right to limit any and all activities pursuant to the terms of the permit. It essentially becomes the OPERATOR'S property, not public property.

The operator pays a fee and for that fee receives the right to make rules that apply to anyone using the property. If the operator wants to say that hiking up is not allowed and that policy is not prohibited in the contract, then that's the rule the public has to follow. The same concept applies to selling hot dogs and beer or giving ski lessons on the property. So, if the ski area operator wants to make a policy stating that you can't hike up the hill while the area is open (or any other time, for that matter), they may be completely within their rights to do so.

Sorry for the rant, but this is kind of a sore spot with me. There seems to be this assumption that because the LAND is public, therefore the public can do anything they want. That's not the case.
post #10 of 15
mjtski,

Many ski areas think of the lift ticket as a "snow use ticket". Along with snow use, you are assuming responsibility for your actions and assuming the risks of the sport. What that means is if you are injured or you injure someone else, the area could sue you for any damages or expenses if not possessing a valid ticket.
post #11 of 15
i mean if its public land, your really just paying to ride the lift, so if you dont ride the lift, why pay? obviously its not that easy... but it should be

not sure why you really want to hike mt snow. i mean yeah, its good for you and saves money, but like... its no huge mountain with epic pow... better off hiking your yard and getting more runs in
post #12 of 15
Kinda dangerous, no matter how far off to the edge you get. I just about waxed a snow-shoer at Moonlight last year. Luckily. my cat-like reflexes saved the day.
post #13 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by We Ski TSV View Post
You still have to buy a ticket to get you to the top where lift service stops, then you hike. It is a tradition in Taos - Hiking the Ridge. Here is an article for you: http://travel.nytimes.com/2006/03/05/travel/05taos.html
Great Article!
post #14 of 15
Here it was not uncommon to see people skinning up the runs (on the sides of course) and ski down, I found it a bit illogical since:
-The nice thing of AT (skinning...) is that one can do it away from the crowds of a ski area
-Usually one goes AT to go off-piste...
Anyway the problem has been solved...IIRC it is now explicitly forbidden (by law) to skin up a run in a ski area.
post #15 of 15
Why not just save your money and spring for the ticket? It's not that expensive. You really want to hike up a mountain every time you ski down it?

Do you bring your own food with you when going to a restaurant?

Sorry, but your question just seems so desperate, if not pathetic.
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