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Finally... had a taste of skiing

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 
OK, so my Winter Park trip is almost here. I had a 3 hour lesson on Sunday at an indoor slope in North Yorkshire...

I LOVED IT....!!!!! I'm not sure of the correct technical terms just yet, but I was able to stop and link turns down a (not that steep) slope. Hopefully this will be a good starting point???

Can't wait to get out on the mountain now.

Although, 1 question - are your feet meant to hurt so much?

post #2 of 18
Was Castleford busy on Sunday? I might be heading over there tonight (to shop, not ski)
Glad you had a good time.

No, your feet shouldn't hurt much. I'm guessing you were in rental boots at the slope. When you get to the resort, spend some time getting the right boots, and don't do them up too tight, cause you need to be able to do snow dances...
post #3 of 18
Thread Starter 
It was fairly busy on Sunday... although I have never been before so I don't have anything to compare it to!

My feet were crushed in them boots. The assistant wasn't very helpful, she said they were meant to be snug? I think they were cutting off the blood supply!!
post #4 of 18
Vickey24,

Welcome to Epic!

While ski boots need to fit snugly, they shouldn't be so tight that they hurt or cut off circulation. Did the assistant check your boots? If not, a common mistake beginner/novice skiers make is having their pants or power cuff tucked inside the boots. This always causes discomfort. There are only 2 things that should be in the boot. One is the foot and the other a ski specific sock that is pulled up, so it is smooth with no wrinkles.
If the boot has 4 buckles, the ones by the toes and instep don't need to be overly tight, the buckle by the ankle should be snug to keep the heel back into the heel pocket and the top buckle just tight enough that the buckle stays closed.

If you have a high instep (arch of the foot), you may also need a foot bed to support your arch (not supplied by a rental shop).

When renting boots at winter park, if the boot hurts, go back to the shop and try another boot.

It sounds like you have an excellent start with your skiing, linking turns and stopping opens up beg/novice terrain for you. You'll have a blast.

RW
post #5 of 18
you may not be able to get rental boots that fit properly, i know i can't. if you buy boots, there are a lot more options available and the shop can make adjustments by grinding and stretching the shells for you if needed.
post #6 of 18
And as a beginner renting equipment, don't rule out having the right boot on the left foot and left boot on the right foot by accident. Or having two left boots. Or having the left liner in the right shell on the ??? foot. Don't laugh, I have seen it happen. Check the gear carefully.

Glad you had fun! Prepare for skiing to become a lifelong addiction!
post #7 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron White View Post
... If not, a common mistake beginner/novice skiers make is having their pants or power cuff tucked inside the boots. This always causes discomfort. There are only 2 things that should be in the boot. One is the foot and the other a ski specific sock that is pulled up, so it is smooth with no wrinkles.
If the boot has 4 buckles, the ones by the toes and instep don't need to be overly tight, the buckle by the ankle should be snug to keep the heel back into the heel pocket and the top buckle just tight enough that the buckle stays closed.
...
I'm glad I took a peek at this thread.
I have had trouble keeping the top buckle on one of my boots from being too loose at the tightest setting (my calf on that side is a little withered from nerve damage), so I've taken to stuffing my base layers and powder cuffs into my boots to make them both a little tighter. Just been too lazy/forgetful to adjust the buckle instead. I'm going to finally just adjust the boot and try your recommendations next time I ski (hopefully Saturday).
I have been a stickler my entire life for having my shoes tied on very tight, probably because my feet are long and skinny. I could never stand to wear slip-ons, for example, and I stop to re-tie my XC boots about every 20 minutes. I used to clamp my ski boots on as tight as I possibly could, but have at least learned to not do that (it's tough to ski when you can't feel your feet). Maybe keeping all of my clothes out of the boot will be even more comfortable.
post #8 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron White View Post
There are only 2 things that should be in the boot. One is the foot and the other a ski specific sock that is pulled up, so it is smooth with no wrinkles.
Ron, maybe this is a dumb question: I keep my ski pants outside the boot, but what about my Patagonia and/or Chili Peppers bottoms? I have been pulling them down to the ankles and putting my socks over them. Not good?
post #9 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jimski View Post
Ron, maybe this is a dumb question: I keep my ski pants outside the boot, but what about my Patagonia and/or Chili Peppers bottoms? I have been pulling them down to the ankles and putting my socks over them. Not good?
No, not good. Just roll them up your calf.
post #10 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jimski View Post
Ron, maybe this is a dumb question: I keep my ski pants outside the boot, but what about my Patagonia and/or Chili Peppers bottoms? I have been pulling them down to the ankles and putting my socks over them. Not good?
If it doesn't bother you then it's fine. Usually if it's enough to hurt it really hurts. When I wear a thin underlayer I pullmy socks over it and both layers end up in the uper boot. if I wear a thicker layer, like sweat pants, then I keep it above the boot top. The pain will become unbearable so if it's a problem you will know about it.
post #11 of 18

boots hurt

Vicky24. One boot tip. I do this myself 37 yrs skiing. You aren't going to get perfectly fitting rental boots.
SO: buckle them-but be careful not too tight first thing in the day. then after one run or two if they seem a little loose tighten them a little at a time.

If you make them too tight first thing, then you will have trouble all day. You can always snug them up a bit but going the other way doesn't work. IF you do this inadvertently then take them off during lunch and start over after lunch - NOT TOO TIGHT TO BEGIN.

Good luck have a great time. We got 24 inches of very dry powder last night.
post #12 of 18
Vicky, welcome to the skiing community! I'm really happy that you had a good first outing. Keep us posted on your experiences when you get out on the hill.

As for painful feet, here as some thoughts.

As it's been said, there's nothing more important than your boots. I know people who ski in boots that are falling apart because they swear that they'll never find anything as comfortable again, who will never check their boots in when they fly in case they get lost, and many similar stories. The bottom line is that the difference between having boots that fit and boots that don't is the single biggest difference-maker to your skiing experience -- both how much fun you have and how effectively you do it.

So, if you're going to be a skier (and it sounds like you've been bitten, doesn't it?) then does it make sense to buy boots right away? You'll save money in the long run, of course, so it's tempting, but my advice, on balance, is to hold off for the first holiday. A little bit of experience will make you a more savvy customer next time round. The thing is, getting to that perfect boot fit is elusive (and can be very expensive). Boot guys will sell you all kinds of custom adjustments (footbeds, alignments, etc., etc.) and that can be necessary. But it can also be very pricey.

I'll tell you my own experience to illustrate.

I own two pairs of boots at present. The first one I got about five years ago. I went to the ski shop in the resort with the best bootfitting reputation on the evening of my first day's skiing. I spent a long time being measured, balanced, having custom footbeds made and so on. Then I skied the boots for the rest of the holiday, going back most evenings for some kind of adjustment. By the end of the week, the bootfitter and I knew each other pretty well (in fact, she's still a good friend) and I had a pair of boots that fitted. It wasn't cheap, but it was worth it.

A couple of years ago, I was in the resort at the end of the season and I realized that it made sense to have a pair of boots to leave in Europe and a pair to have in the U.S. In the last week or so, the resort tends to be empty and there isn't much business in the ski shops. Also, they are having end-of-season sales (the shops close in the summer). So I walked into a shop -- in fact, the same company that I bought my other boots from -- and took about twenty minutes of the bootfitter's time since there weren't any other customers about. He had all kinds of bins of odds and ends and he went through them giving me things to try on. Finally, he gave me a pair that weren't end of the range (but there was an overall 40% discount) and they fitted right off. I bought them, skied them the next day and didn't need a single adjustment. In fact, I didn't even bother to put my custom footbeds in them. As it turned out, they were made by the same company as made my other pair but cost me less than half as much. When I went skiing the other day here in the U.S. I really couldn't remember which of the boots I had on until I looked down and checked.

All of which is a long way of saying that boot buying is a black art.

But here's the take-away message. If your boots hurt you, go back to the shop and tell them. Yes, boots are supposed to be tight so that you can transmit messages from your legs to your skis effectively, and some people are simply not used to wearing tight footwear. But there's tight and hurting. In particular, if your feet have red marks (pressure points) you need to do something about it. I used to think that that was simply part of the deal -- what you had to put up with when you went skiing. Learn from my mistake -- it's not and you don't!
post #13 of 18
You did fine. Actually, you did better than I did. I only learned one stupid looooong swooping turn to the left on the first day. Doing nice linked turns is a good sign and that is exactly where you were supposed to be at the completion of the first lesson.

Boots ... prior to purchase spend some time with us.

The only thing that goes into your ski boot is your foot with one ski sock on it.

The long undies get a nice neat comfortable cuffing so they don't end up in the boot. They can become a "hot spot" and irritate after awhile. I just pull my Chillies back toward my knee.

When you are getting fitted, a light ski sock is the best. Buy two pairs of the same sock so one may be rinsed and hung to dry.

If you are going to .... I hope you will be renting gear at WP in a shop like a real honest to goodness ski shop. Rental shop gear, though I can't speak for WP, can be a nightmare of horrible stuff.

Get some local info from one of this crew on where you can rent good stuff ..... and yes ... it makes a difference.
post #14 of 18
jimski,

[Ro
Quote:
n, maybe this is a dumb question: I keep my ski pants outside the boot, but what about my Patagonia and/or Chili Peppers bottoms? I have been pulling them down to the ankles and putting my socks over them. Not good?
It's fine, as long as there is a smooth transition between your socks and base layer.

RW
post #15 of 18
Thanks!

Less than a week til I'm back on the slopes!!
post #16 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron White View Post
jimski,

[Ro

It's fine, as long as there is a smooth transition between your socks and base layer.

RW
There is no way I can get my present base layers over my calf without cutting a seam open, so I was glad to see this. The cuffs do seem to fit in nicely between the padded areas of my socks, at least. If it's a mid-cold day and I wear thicker fleece pants without a thin base layer, I can wear those over my calf.

Ron, I've been trying to follow your buckling instructions, and have noticed an increase in comfort without feeling like I've lost any ski control. Thanks for sharing!

BTW, any recommendations for boots with a strap at the top? I used to pull the strap really tight, but it would just slide over the top of the boot, anyway.
post #17 of 18
Virtus Probi,

Quote:
BTW, any recommendations for boots with a strap at the top? I used to pull the strap really tight, but it would just slide over the top of the boot, anyway.
Many boots have a slot cut down both sides of the top cuff that allow the power strap to be put under hard plastic and just around the liner in the front. The top 2 buckles and top cuff are then buckled over it. The strap can then be tightened just snugly around the liner. If that is not the case with your boots, there are after market straps that can replace the strap that comes with the boot and applied in such a manner so it is inside the cuff in front.

Another adjustment that people with very large calves make is taking the spoiler out that is on the rear of the top cuff. That often causes the ankle to be over flexed and sometimes makes the foot to move forward in the boot so the ankle joint is ahead of the boot flex hinge point, or a loose feeling in the heel.

RW
post #18 of 18

Bump for any beginners getting started way down south, as in Australia or New Zealand.  A thread from 2008 with an OP from the UK.  Good info about how to handle rental boots and what goes inside a boot.

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