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How can you get the best workout/conditioning while skiing 300ft of vert?

post #1 of 24
Thread Starter 
I have the opportunity this winter to ski the Blue Hills (310ft) three or four nights a week this season, and I would like to use it as training time. Once they get some natural snow and allow a bump run to form I will do zipper laps for a couple hours a day, but until then what is the best way for me to get a good workout and build muscle in my legs, back, etc. while skiing such short laps?

I was thinking maybe "pure" carving where I am really working on bending the ski, and focusing on controlling the rebound and directing it down the hill?

What other skills/drills will be good for strength building on the vast expanse of the Blue hills?
post #2 of 24
Walk up.

Ski on one ski at a time.

Make hop turns all the way down.

I find that skiing a SL ski helps me find a solid 'centered' position on my skis, which obviously helps out when you get into the woods up here.
post #3 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by JayPowHound View Post
I have the opportunity this winter to ski the Blue Hills (310ft) three or four nights a week this season, and I would like to use it as training time. Once they get some natural snow and allow a bump run to form I will do zipper laps for a couple hours a day, but until then what is the best way for me to get a good workout and build muscle in my legs, back, etc. while skiing such short laps?

I was thinking maybe "pure" carving where I am really working on bending the ski, and focusing on controlling the rebound and directing it down the hill?

What other skills/drills will be good for strength building on the vast expanse of the Blue hills?
ski on 1 ski. That 310ft will seem alot longer.
post #4 of 24
How fast is their lift? I find I get a pretty good workout doing laps at a local resort because the lift ride up is so quick. Over period of hours, it kicks my ass as much as longer/slower laps at a big mountain.
post #5 of 24
ditto SL skis,
post #6 of 24
Take up telemark skiing
post #7 of 24
1. Get some twin tips and ski down backwards.

2. Or do a handstand on the skis, and ski down with your feet in the air.
post #8 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by ZeroGravity View Post
Take up telemark skiing
What he said.
post #9 of 24
Theres a couple of guys that walk up sometimes at our hill. That would make 310' of arse kick for you...
post #10 of 24
Put a live badger in your pants.
post #11 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by KZ1964 View Post
Theres a couple of guys that walk up sometimes at our hill. That would make 310' of arse kick for you...
Good idea. To make it more efficient, I'd say get a set of skis with AT bindings and skins, and earn your turns. You're also bound to get a lot of odd looks....
post #12 of 24
Thread Starter 
I do a lot of hiking as it is, so those aren't really the muscles that I'm trying to focus on. Neither is cardio, although that is always nice. It is the ski specific stuff (quads, glutes, back...) that I want to really work.

I have twintips and can ski switch fairly well... at least on blue terrain I can. I'm not sure that offers much more workout than skiing straight does though...

I know how to tele a bit, but do not have boots at the moment. My ski budget is pretty much spent for the year, so I don't see myself bending a knee anytime soon.

I like the idea of working one ski. I have played around with this a bit, but never very much. Some of the race kids I've seen doing these drills can really rip, turning both directions with one ski on EITHER foot. I'll have to work on that. I definitely have a strong and week leg when it comes to this!

Keep the ideas coming. I got out today for a dozen laps on 300ft of WROD in the 60 degree weather and actually had a lot of fun with it!
post #13 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by JayPowHound View Post
I do a lot of hiking as it is, so those aren't really the muscles that I'm trying to focus on. Neither is cardio, although that is always nice. It is the ski specific stuff (quads, glutes, back...) that I want to really work.

I have twintips and can ski switch fairly well... at least on blue terrain I can. I'm not sure that offers much more workout than skiing straight does though...

I know how to tele a bit, but do not have boots at the moment. My ski budget is pretty much spent for the year, so I don't see myself bending a knee anytime soon.

I like the idea of working one ski. I have played around with this a bit, but never very much. Some of the race kids I've seen doing these drills can really rip, turning both directions with one ski on EITHER foot. I'll have to work on that. I definitely have a strong and week leg when it comes to this!

Keep the ideas coming. I got out today for a dozen laps on 300ft of WROD in the 60 degree weather and actually had a lot of fun with it!
squats, lunges, deadlifts, back hyper extensions, etc.
post #14 of 24
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by spyderracer393 View Post
squats, lunges, deadlifts, back hyper extensions, etc.
Yup, gotcha. It's a lot more fun to build them up by SKIING though, and now that I can ski 2 or 3 hours a night, 3 or 4 nights a week, (plus weekends of course) I'd like to make that my workout.
post #15 of 24
I see where you're coming from, especially because I am an instructor at a similar place, but I think it is a lot easier to build the muscle in the weight room and use the muscle on the hill, rather than build it on the hill.

just my 2 cents...
post #16 of 24
Sell the Bros and get a nice freeheel set-up. How are you going to have fun on the zipper line of Blue Hills? Ripping tele turns, that's how. $900 for a pair of skis? You have got to be kidding me. Oh, I can't afford telemark boots! BooHoo. Listen to your family.
post #17 of 24
Thread Starter 
No grief coming from my family... that was the other guy. And the 183s I ordered were closer to $600 than $900. That said, they're not here yet... and I DO have skis and a pair of hardwire CRB's lying around, I just need a boot. Maybe I'll think about it some more.
post #18 of 24
Keep an eye out for a used pair. I really think it's the best way to have fun on a small hill and get a workout and develop skiing skills esp. balance.
post #19 of 24
300 feet. Ok, that shouldn't take very long to get back up to the top. So let's say you get 30-40 lift rides per ski day.

That's 12000 verts of pivot slips you could be doing each day



12000 verts of Charleston

12000 verts of Rhumba

12000 verts of jump turns
post #20 of 24
Any chance to run gates?
post #21 of 24
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by prickly View Post
Any chance to run gates?
I think there will be. I don't have much of a racing background, but I'll hop into the team's courses whenever I can. For now I have a 162 Rossi Z9 (13m R) for my hard snow ski. Next year it may get replaced with a true SL.
post #22 of 24
You want a work out?
Try skating up instead of riding the lift.
Not enough? Try it on SGs.

You might have more fun just making tighter turns on the smallest radius ski (real ski that is) you can find. Bumps can add a little effort if don't do them the easy way.
post #23 of 24
Weight vest
post #24 of 24
I would second the suggestion to run gates. See if you can get into a racing program. I don't know if this will increase the conditioning benefit but it will allow you to get the most out of the experience and the limited terrain. There are quite a few such mountains in the midwest that turn out remarkably good skiers with these programs even though vertical is limited.
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