or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

How do YOU tell it's cold?

post #1 of 84
Thread Starter 
Skied a few hours at Loveland on Sunday and it was super cold. The thermometer in the car read as low as -9...and who knows how accurate it is at those temps. So, how cold was it really?

Well, after about 40 minutes back in the car with heater blasting, we stopped for a food and potty break. By then my fingers were warm but...umm...there's no delicate way to describe this, but when I went to pee, there was a part of my body that was still cold to the touch that NEVER should be cold.

There was some nice snow though...
post #2 of 84
I lived in Fairbanks for years, and my gauge for "really cold" was when I walked outside and my nose hairs froze instantly and my throat constricted and made me cough on my first breath.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wannabe View Post
Well, after about 40 minutes back in the car with heater blasting, we stopped for a food and potty break. By then my fingers were warm but...umm...there's no delicate way to describe this, but when I went to pee, there was a part of my body that was still cold to the touch that NEVER should be cold.
There was a condition up in Alaska called "Arctic Madness," which sets in when you hafta pee but you're wearing three inches of clothes and only have two inches of willy to work with.
post #3 of 84
Thread Starter 
Quote:
There was a condition up in Alaska called "Arctic Madness," which sets in when you hafta pee but you're wearing three inches of clothes and only have two inches of willy to work with.
Yet another bad thing about shrinkage...
post #4 of 84
When the nose hairs start freezing, that's my first sign that it's actually gotten "cold". When it's so cold that it honestly starts to hurt to breathe -- then it's gotten C-O-L-D. For me, that's somewhere around 10 to 15 below.
post #5 of 84
One word: Snotsicles.
post #6 of 84
-29F and you have frost on the outside of your fleece under your shell after skiing trees all morning.

Now add the wind chill one other day, which brought the temp down to -75 and you could see your breath at the condiment table in the base lodge that was a cold day.
post #7 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Lee View Post
I lived in Fairbanks for years, and my gauge for "really cold" was when I walked outside and my nose hairs froze instantly and my throat constricted and made me cough on my first breath.


There was a condition up in Alaska called "Arctic Madness," which sets in when you hafta pee but you're wearing three inches of clothes and only have two inches of willy to work with.
HA-HA.........Ft, Greely as a R/D Met Ob. in the S.F. When my mustache froze on the first breath then -40F or colder. Beware you can freeze your lungs.
post #8 of 84
Thread Starter 
Speaking of freezing your lungs...after my nose froze shut I was panting a bit through my mouth (uncovered for a bit) and I think I got close to freezing my tongue. It felt wierd and kind of numb for the rest of the day anyway...
post #9 of 84
In Artic type tempretures move slow cover your mouth with anything so you will not breathing in ambient temp. air. Sorta like a air chamber effect so exhaled air can heat intake. I have made a few;-) mistakes that were almost life threating. There is a point where your joints will not bend anymore,ect. oh yeah it 7F here,no ski today for me.
post #10 of 84
Frozen nose hairs works for me.

One time in Jackson we had several days of -40° to -50°* nights and -25° days. Too cold to even consider skiing, but wood splits real easy. Bare skin must be covered, and you don't want to breath air that cold...a scarf or something covering the mouth and nose is very important. When chilled, drinking something warm like hot cocoa or hot soup gets warmth inside the body. If seriously chilled, get medical help.

*Mercury freezes at about -40°, but a spirit thermometer can read lower.
post #11 of 84
don't think I've ever heard of a spirit themometer? Course it's been years since I was in Met. We used hot wire temp. insturments.
post #12 of 84
When I boarded an airplane in the southeastern U.S. wearing a t-shirt and it was 65 degrees F and sunny, and then I got off the plane in Jackson, Wy where it was -35 degrees and the wind was blowing 30 mph, it was dark and I had to make my way across an icy tarmac hoping that my luggage with my down jacket was not lost, that is when I knew it was cold. And that was when I knew I was a dumbass for not carrying my down jacket and hat on the plane with me.
post #13 of 84
Why do all these stories about COLD seem to involve Jackson Hole????

Just to continue the typecasting, though...

Years ago we had a friend who had built a new log home. The first winter he had it, he had a lot of flies that would hatch out of little cracks and holes in the interior logs. They would then fly around the house and bop repeatedly on the windows.

We were at his house for dinner one particularly cold night (about -35 degrees) and there was a fly banging on the window. He took me over to the window and said "Watch this."

He cranked out the window and the fly buzzed merrily out of the house. The fly got about 18 inches outside and then all buzzing stopped as the frozen little fly cube plunged to the snow. My friend said they only freeze instantly like that if it's colder than minus 20.

Ever since, when I think about cold, I think about house flies.
post #14 of 84
Bbbzzzzzzzzz Bzzzz Bzt........
post #15 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Peters View Post
Why do all these stories about COLD seem to involve Jackson Hole????

Just to continue the typecasting, though...

Years ago we had a friend who had built a new log home. The first winter he had it, he had a lot of flies that would hatch out of little cracks and holes in the interior logs. They would then fly around the house and bop repeatedly on the windows.

We were at his house for dinner one particularly cold night (about -35 degrees) and there was a fly banging on the window. He took me over to the window and said "Watch this."

He cranked out the window and the fly buzzed merrily out of the house. The fly got about 18 inches outside and then all buzzing stopped as the frozen little fly cube plunged to the snow. My friend said they only freeze instantly like that if it's colder than minus 20.

Ever since, when I think about cold, I think about house flies.
Awwwww poor fly. I'll miss you fly-e!
post #16 of 84
Thread Starter 
Love the fly story...I had a fly in the house last night and supposedly it was -19 for a low. Should have tried that.
post #17 of 84
When I log onto www.theweathernetwork.com and it tells me it's
-41˚C outside, as it did today.

Yes, that's right -41˚C, still air (ie. not including windchill) in Banff, AB this morning at 6:30am!

That's cold.
post #18 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Peters View Post
Why do all these stories about COLD seem to involve Jackson Hole????

Just to continue the typecasting, though...
funny thing is I was at JH 3 winters ago in late March and got on the gondola with another Canadian we had shells and one layer of base layer underwear on...3 or 4 down jacket/fur collar neoprene mask wearing women get on and immediately start complaining about the cold.....usually i just keep my mouth shut but before i could stop myself "you have got to be frikkin kidding me..."
post #19 of 84
I rode the lift yesterday -- bluebird day, 40F -- with a guy totally layered up like the Michelin man, including a face mask and neck gaiter.
post #20 of 84
In his book about climbing the 7 summits, Dick Bass tells a story about stepping outside his tent high on Everest having diarrhea and being worried he had soiled his clothes. He then realized that is was so cold everything had frozen and blown away.

For me about -15 when it starts to hurt to breathe is plenty cold. I think I would have a very hard time with "arctic madness".
post #21 of 84
I was skiing at JH once. It was -50. My jacket made crunching sounds with every move. I was waiting for the sleeves to snap and fall off.
post #22 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Peters View Post
"Watch this."

He cranked out the window and the fly buzzed merrily out of the house. The fly got about 18 inches outside and then all buzzing stopped as the frozen little fly cube plunged to the snow. My friend said they only freeze instantly like that if it's colder than minus 20.

Ever since, when I think about cold, I think about house flies.
Eskimo Bug Zapper
I've skied many times in Minnesota in sub zero with wind blowing in hard off the frozen lake Coldest I recall was about 50 below including wind chill (maybe?). But, keep in mind that in those places I was only 300 vert from the lodge so we could get warm go run four or five quick laps then come back in for 30 minutes to thaw out. When I was younger it was a lot more core venturing in to the back country rolling hills with our sleds, then our cut off Northland skis. Playing hockey outdoors at night in that was also brutal. Do they still make their kids do that? I know folks that go on overnight snowmobile trips in that kind of weather. Not for me anymore. I could probably hang for about two hours before being miserable in anything under 10 below these days no matter how may layers of whatever I have on.

I guess when your feet and hands (nose, etc) burn like they are in the fireplace for 20 minutes after taking off the gloves and boots: THAT's COLD!
post #23 of 84
When the lifts stop running. The local town hill, Snow King, pulls the pug when it is colder than -20F. The mountain manager prides himself on always having the mountain up and running- if possible.
post #24 of 84
It was 59 degrees here today. I was out a few minutes ago in a t-shirt and didn't feel any different than in the house.

Crap.
post #25 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Peters View Post
Years ago we had a friend who had built a new log home. The first winter he had it, he had a lot of flies that would hatch out of little cracks and holes in the interior logs. They would then fly around the house and bop repeatedly on the windows.

We were at his house for dinner one particularly cold night (about -35 degrees) and there was a fly banging on the window. He took me over to the window and said "Watch this."

He cranked out the window and the fly buzzed merrily out of the house. The fly got about 18 inches outside and then all buzzing stopped as the frozen little fly cube plunged to the snow. My friend said they only freeze instantly like that if it's colder than minus 20.

Ever since, when I think about cold, I think about house flies.
For some more cheap thrills, next time it's 40 below pour some boiling water into a mug and take it outside and pitch the water up into the air. Awesome.
post #26 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Lee View Post
For some more cheap thrills, next time it's 40 below pour some boiling water into a mug and take it outside and pitch the water up into the air. Awesome.
Pretty cool!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8OAMgxXLDNM&NR

post #27 of 84
+1 to the nose hair freeze and add eyelashes to the list. Having weighted lashes feels really weird

-37C is the coldest I have experienced, at that temp XC skis just do not work, it's like skiing in sand - def no wax required! or alpine skiing, any tiny bit of exposed skin is pianfully raw within seconds and boots are nearly impossible to do up.

In those kind of temps be very careful, a remember hearing about a girl missed her bus and decided to walk the 35mins home and died on the way.
post #28 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by narc View Post
-37C is the coldest I have experienced, at that temp XC skis just do not work, it's like skiing in sand
Yep. That's how I know it's cold - the snow becomes really slow. A couple years ago I was at Searchmont when they were having a race on a 35 below day - the warming hut was jammed with racers all complaining about how slow the snow was.
post #29 of 84
I know it's cold when blinking causes my eyes to freeze shut.
post #30 of 84
First of all, wind chill is NOT the same as real temperature. It is the rate of cooling caused by wind. Snow will not squeak at 15F no matter how much wind blows.

Cold: Snow squeaks.
Real cold: It is biting to breathe.
Damn cold: Tires keep their flat spots, greased bearings solidify.
Too cold: Glass cracks at the slightest tap. Bourbon freezes. Centigrade looks warmer than Farenheit.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Skiing Discussion