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Severe Calf and Quad Muscle Fatigue

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 
Hello,

I recently found this board and am impressed with the level of expertise I've found here. I have a question about the fit of my boots that I'm hoping someone can help me with.

I recently bought a pair of new Nordica Olympia One 10 ski boots and took them out for the first time today. Almost immediately I noticed strong muscle strain and fatigue on my calves and thighs to the point that I could not stand in my boots for longer than a minute or two without sitting down to rest. I was so miserable that I called it quits at 11:30 while my husband and friends enjoyed a great full day on the slopes. Otherwise my boots are perfectly comfortable and seem to be a good fit. They are warm and snug, they do not hurt my feet or ankles, my toe just barely grazes the end of the boot, and my feet do not move around inside the boot.

Some background information on me: I am a beginning skiier. I have only skiied a few times, but really enjoyed myself each time. I now live close enough to a ski resort to be able to ski two or more times per month, so I treated myself to a new set of skis (K2 Sweet Luv) and boots. I am short and and a healthy weight, although I am not in top physical shape.

Although I thoroughly expected to be tired and sore after a day skiing , I have never felt this kind of immediate and sustained pain and I don't want to hit the slopes again if it means being that miserable.

So my question is: what could be the cause of this pain? My boots hardly flex at all and I think the forward lean could be a big part of the problem. Although I'm sure my lack of conditioning is partly to blame, I can't imagine that the answer is that simple. Also, does this pain have something to do with the fact that my boots are new? I don't want to spend half the season being miserable just to break in my boots!

Thanks in advance for any advice you might be willing to offer!
post #2 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by lilfoot1598 View Post
Hello,

I recently bought a pair of new Nordica Olympia One 10 ski boots

Although I thoroughly expected to be tired and sore after a day skiing---
My boots hardly flex at all and I think the forward lean could be a big part of the problem.
Hi lilfoot1598,

This kind of extreme fatigue would indicate you have a fore/aft balance problem which could be related to the forward lean/boot board angle/or delta angle created by the binding interface with your boots. Look for a boot fitter in the sticky at the top of the "Ask the boot guy's" area and get some advice and help where the person can see your feet/boots/skis and make adjustments.

By the way the Nordica one 10 boot has a flex index of 45---not a stiff boot.

miketsc
cped/master bootfitter
post #3 of 11
^ +1

Also consider skill, technique, fitness as contributing factors.
post #4 of 11
Find a fitter who will measure dorsiflexion of your ankle joint. If you are not able to flex that boot it more an issue of your ankle joint and the boot being stiff. There are a bunch of things that might cause this, but you need to see a good fitter and let them figure things out first hand.
post #5 of 11
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the advice! I got my equipment at REI and feel like my salesperson wasn't very knowledgeable. I'll go back there to see what they have to say and may end up buying from a specialized shop or visiting a boot fitter.

I'm pretty sure the problem has to do with the forward lean of the boot. When I stand in just my boots on the ground, my knees align with my toes. Supporting my weight with my legs at that angle is very difficult. Strangely enough, I barely notice the fatigue when I'm actually skiing an easy slope (standing is much more uncomfortable) so fitness and skill level are probably only minor factors.

Thanks again!
post #6 of 11
if the boot has a small shim in the back of it you have removed that right?

An experiment is to add a heel lift too. This is allow less of you calf in the boot, and might allow you to stand more upright in the boot. Also it is cheap, removable, and will give the bootfitter some more info to work with.

where are you? we have alist of some good bootfitters at the top of the forum page.
post #7 of 11
Thread Starter 
I didn't remove or adjust any part of the boot since this is the first pair of boots I've owned and I'm clueless. I'm trusting the bootfitter at REI to give me good advice. Luckily the REI return policy is so good that I don't have to spend extra money modifying a pair of boots.

I went back to the store yesterday and exchanged my boots for the Salomon Divine RS CF. I felt the difference immediately and wore them around the house all evening with no fatigue!

I did look for bootfitters in my area (Portland), but the closest is a few hours away. I'm currently looking into local independent shops for future equipment purchases.
post #8 of 11
You sound like a smart lady Lilfoot1598!
post #9 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by lilfoot1598 View Post
. I'm trusting the bootfitter at REI to give me good advice. Luckily the REI return policy is so good that I don't have to spend extra money modifying a pair of boots.
the return policy is great, but if you just retrun bad for bad, and no one knows what to do it is a crap shoot if the new ones will be any better

Quote:
Originally Posted by lilfoot1598 View Post
I went back to the store yesterday and exchanged my boots for the Salomon Divine RS CF. I felt the difference immediately and wore them around the house all evening with no fatigue!
hope that it is better

Quote:
Originally Posted by lilfoot1598 View Post
I did look for bootfitters in my area (Portland), but the closest is a few hours away. I'm currently looking into local independent shops for future equipment purchases.

Good plan. chain stores are great for a few things, but for any real advice not usually the best bet.
post #10 of 11
Thread Starter 
Well, I tried out my new Salomon boots. They worked just fine until I hit steeper terrain and felt my foot sliding forward. After a lot of research, I "shell fit" my boots and realized that they are too big. I know, surprise surprise. You'd think that the bootfitter at REI would have AT LEAST known to measure my foot or remove the liner to check the sizing when he sold them to me.

So I took the boots back and another salesman confirmed that my boots are waaaaay too big (my feet are a 21 and I am currently in a 23.5). Unfortunately, REI does not carry ANY boot in my size.

So I need your help! I'll be returning my boots to REI for a refund, but have no idea where to go for new ones. I don't want to repeat my REI experience. Any suggestions of a good fitter in Portland or on Mt. Hood? I see there is a fitter in Oregon on this board, but he's too far from me.

Also, how much can I expect to pay for a new pair of boots and a proper fitting? I bought all new gear this year and cannot afford to pay much above what I have already spent, which leaves me with a $300 budget for boots. Eek!

Thanks in advance for any help you can give!!
post #11 of 11
First there is no reason to expect the fitter in a big box store will have been properly trained. Sorry you learned the hard way, but REI is reputable and I would think you can get your money back.

As far as pricing goes we are each independent and operate our businesses differently. But at my store for instance we include basic fitting in the retail price. I imagine there are others out there with the same policy.

Lou
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