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old school

post #1 of 26
Thread Starter 
post #2 of 26
Cool video.
post #3 of 26
Nice The good 'ole days.
post #4 of 26
great athletes, also with old school bindings...
post #5 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by RonSki View Post
great athletes, also with old school bindings...
Notice even the telemarker is using fixed heel bindings.
post #6 of 26
No school like the old school.
post #7 of 26
Old school? I still ski like that.....
post #8 of 26
Turn the sound off and what immediately jumps to mind?....

Juicy Fruit!

post #9 of 26
look up fire and ice on youtube for some sweet ski footy
post #10 of 26
don't forget this:
post #11 of 26
Sorry for the screw up, here it is:
post #12 of 26
Thanks -- just thanks.
post #13 of 26
Thread Starter 
See...we didn't need no stink'n shaped skis to have some FUN
post #14 of 26
Isn't that what people driving the model-t said about horses?
Not sure if that makes any sense....
Besides, aren't you skiing on things made in this century now?
post #15 of 26
Dom Perignon was a famous french skier? Never heard of him...
post #16 of 26
"Hot Dog"!
post #17 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rossi Smash View Post
See...we didn't need no stink'n shaped skis to have some FUN
I agree 100%

post #18 of 26
That's not an optical illusion - those skis really are that big!
What were they 240cm?
I think he's doing some testing for a new concept in the "Son of Godzilla" PMGear line. They might not fit into the "Brogram" though!
post #19 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tog View Post
What were they 240cm?
yep! they are 240cm Atomic real deal speed skis.

post #20 of 26
Thread Starter 
[quote=Tog;1019279]Isn't that what people driving the model-t said about horses?
Not sure if that makes any sense....
Besides, aren't you skiing on things made in this century now?[/quote]

Sometimes......

I've officially adopted the "my favorite skis are the ones I have on" slogan....regardless of decade of origin
post #21 of 26
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tyrone Shoelaces View Post
yep! they are 240cm Atomic real deal speed skis.


Those make my 208cm Atomic SG's look like freestyle stix
post #22 of 26
I stumbled on this video of still images from the '70's.
Nice K2 bases!! the red/white/blue stripes.
Jeans! Sittin' back on moguls! Some serious air!
I love the tandem jump at 2:59.
post #23 of 26

Old - Whats Old?

Tyrone, nice memories. I never skied that well back then but (and you can relate to this) skiing Kirkwood one day on my 3G's, 207's I dropped into One Man Chute at Kirkwood and boy was I flying coming out the bottom side. A real rush. You do not turn a 207 in One Man Chute. thanks for the memories.
post #24 of 26
[quote=Rossi Smash;1019366]
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tog View Post
Isn't that what people driving the model-t said about horses?
Not sure if that makes any sense....
Besides, aren't you skiing on things made in this century now?[/quote]

Sometimes......

I've officially adopted the "my favorite skis are the ones I have on" slogan....regardless of decade of origin
That's how I do it.

I'm hoping to take my 710's to Copper this weekend and make a few runs on them before switching to my new Mojo 80's.
post #25 of 26
Took this from another old school thread here a little while ago. Very interesting article I've quoted from. Jack Taylor died April 14, 2008 in a boating accident.



Quote:
From: http://www.steamboatpilot.com/news/2...and_skied_lar/

Tom Ross remembers: Little Jack lived and skied large
by Tom Ross

Taylor was the world champion mogul skier for three consecutive years (1975-77). During those days, one never knew when he might return home to Steamboat and set runs like Concentration ablaze with his speed and precision. He could be intimidating to mere mortals. His ability to turn rapidly in the bumps was dazzling, yet his upper body was supremely quiet, his wrists flicking subtly to set each pole plant.

Pro tour veteran Rusty Taylor (no relation) said Little Jack taught him his method for keeping a quiet upper body and his gaze three or four bumps ahead.

“Jack visualized his hands and eyes forming an isosceles triangle,” Rusty Taylor said. “He always kept his eyes and hands in the same plane, and his goal was never to let one side of the triangle get longer than the other.”

By adhering to this relationship among hands and eyes, Little Jack was always in balance, letting his hips and legs turn the skis while his upper body addressed the fall line.

Doug Muller, another Steamboat-based pro mogul skier from those days, said Little Jack was known for launching huge air — twister spreads and spread eagles — right down the fall line.
“Jack had a style no one else ever quite had,” Muller recalled. “He was so balanced, his pole plants were always at 10 and 2 o’clock. He was always competing with himself, and I can’t say I ever saw him fall down.”

Little Jack’s best friend, Big Jack Carey, called Taylor the forerunner of modern moguls skiing.
“Jack was the quickest turner, knees going so quick, absorbing bumps. He didn’t do recoveries. He was the closest thing to a flawless bump skier. Contests were not a dual format. It was one man skiing his line and judged by a panel of five.”
post #26 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tog View Post
I stumbled on this video of still images from the '70's.
Nice K2 bases!! the red/white/blue stripes.
Jeans! Sittin' back on moguls! Some serious air!
I love the tandem jump at 2:59
Thanks for thatThat was right in my back yard in 1978 and 79 and I never heard of Cedar Hills. I did see someone that looked a lot like a person competed with/against in 1981 and 82 maybe?
Very cool indeed
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