EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › Worth buying Legend 8000 ('06, Flat) for $160
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Worth buying Legend 8000 ('06, Flat) for $160

post #1 of 24
Thread Starter 
So, it looks like they have finally hit quadruple clearance. Is the newer 8000 with a modified sidecut and fluid integrated binding so much better, or should I just get these and pay another $100 for the PX12 Lifter?

A related Question: For my wife, (petite, 5'4" 105 lbs) who skis pretty laid back would the legend 3800 in 158 be appropriate (I suppose the buinding could be mounted slightly forward) It's currently at $110 flat.

Thanks for the input.
post #2 of 24
I haven't skied the newer model, but I have older model and it's a very nice ski.

I have been a little frustrated with it on one thing though: It's kind of a tweener in my opinion. At just under 80 mm under foot, it's really not as fat as I'd like it for big-time back-side skiing. It's also pretty light and gets easily pushed around in crud. Then again, it's just a little too fat to be a great front-side carver.

It can handle most conditions pretty decently. But I don't find it to be great at anything.

I doubt the newer model changes the ski too significantly... A different sidecut might help it carve better on the front-side of the mountain, but the integrated binding isn't going to do much imho.

So where do you ski? What kinds of conditions? I would guess that this would be a cheap new addition to your quiver and not your only ski... ?

It's a ski I like a lot, but don't love.
post #3 of 24
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the response.

I ski mostly in the east. I have a short frontside carver I really like (older omecarve) but over the past few years I have tended to seek out ungroomed snow and they either get pushed around in crud or hang in chop. And when there is some powder I get no float. Anyway, since I usually get no more than 10 days in per year I don't want to spend much.

When we do ski out west (now infrequqnet since we have little kids) I will usually rent something like a B83 and my wife will ski the burnin luv.
post #4 of 24
It will be best in the ungroomed and in bumps. For an East Coast skiers, the 8000 is a fair all-mountain ski that is adequate for most everyting but excels at nothing, except when the snow is soft and/or light.

It will be ok in softer eastern condtions but won't have the best hold on 'real' Eastern hardpack ice. When the snow gets wet and heavy, like it does out East at times, it will be tossed around like a rag doll due to its light weight and soft tips.

Better all-around ski for the East would be the IM77 or 82 - stiffer and can handle the hardpack bette. rFor $160, however, I would pick it up and use it for soft snow days or ungroomed.

An east coast skier could do better, but could do worse too.
post #5 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by MojoMan View Post
the 8000 is a fair all-mountain ski that is adequate for most everyting but excels at nothing, except when the snow is soft and/or light.

An east coast skier could do better, but could do worse too.
Apparently you missed the dozens of other threads that would vehemantly disagree with those statements (as would I). Either you haven't really been on them, or.... And getting "thrown in slop" - please - if you have a need to shill for Head that's fine, but c'mon.

Get the 8k's - I use them now as my normal least coast ski, and have them (they're literally sitting by the door) waiting for Whistler's lifts to open this morning as there's not much off-piste open, and they'll be perfect.

For that price you can't go wrong. I'd see about the 4800's vs. the 3800's for the wife. She may get limited on the 38's..
post #6 of 24
I liked the 8000 a lot and found it great in bumps, groomers and powder up to a foot or so. Pretty good on ice too. A very good all- arounder. It was my everyday ski for a season or two, until the next thing came along. I miss them, they're a great ski. Where can you get them for so cheap? (not that I need yet another pair of skis...) P. S. my wife has the Legend Exclusives and loves them
post #7 of 24
Thread Starter 
Well, snofun, I'm nearly convinced. Only question left is a) again, is the newer 8000 significantly better in any way? b) for me 200 lbs 5'10" do I go with the 172 or 178. I tend ski a shorter ski because I actually have pretty short legs and my center of mass is lower. c) am I correct in looking at the px12 lifter as an appropriate binding.

As for the wife: I know that many women like the exclusive legend. Is it essentially the same as the 3800 (sidecut looks identical) ? save the binding location marks?
post #8 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by snofun3 View Post
Apparently you missed the dozens of other threads that would vehemantly disagree with those statements (as would I). Either you haven't really been on them, or.... And getting "thrown in slop" - please - if you have a need to shill for Head that's fine, but c'mon.

Get the 8k's - I use them now as my normal least coast ski, and have them (they're literally sitting by the door) waiting for Whistler's lifts to open this morning as there's not much off-piste open, and they'll be perfect.

For that price you can't go wrong. I'd see about the 4800's vs. the 3800's for the wife. She may get limited on the 38's..
Maybe a few years ago but IMO, if I were to pick between the 8000 and some of the newer all-mountain skis available in the ~80ish range, I woud likely pass on the 8000 if I were skiing mostly on the East coast.

Thats not to say the 8000 is a bad sk because it's noti. It's just that an east coast skier could do better today IMO with all the choices now available in the 80mm range. And I will certainly stick to my assertion that the IM77 or 82 will hold much better on the hard stuff and not get bashed around as much in crud and wet slop.

Its a matter of physics, not brand loyalty. Thye 8000 is light and relatively soft up front. The 77 and 82 are fairly stiff, heavy, and damp.

That was then, this is now. IMO, an east coaster can do betrter today
post #9 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by aschick View Post
Well, snofun, I'm nearly convinced. Only question left is a) again, is the newer 8000 significantly better in any way? b) for me 200 lbs 5'10" do I go with the 172 or 178. I tend ski a shorter ski because I actually have pretty short legs and my center of mass is lower. c) am I correct in looking at the px12 lifter as an appropriate binding.

As for the wife: I know that many women like the exclusive legend. Is it essentially the same as the 3800 (sidecut looks identical) ? save the binding location marks?
To be honest, my favorite 8k's (3 pairs in the family) are my old orange 05/06's, with PX12's flat mounted - they slink all around the hill, and aren't completely out of their element when there's some pow around Between the older and newer (with the 4mm tip increase), I feel VERY little, if any, difference. Is it significantly better - short answer -no - it's barely perceptible (if at all).

And my latest pair have the fluid system - let's just say I'm not convinced that it's a better way to go.

A lot of people will feel different about the size, but if you're doing East, and want to go off piste, the 172's would be my choice for the tighter trees and smaller venues.

The PX12 would be the binding to go for.
post #10 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by MojoMan View Post
some of the newer all-mountain skis available in the ~80ish range

....could do better today IMO with all the choices now available in the 80mm range. And I will certainly stick to my assertion....
Please advise where he can get all these "better" skis for $160, since as he says, he doesn't want to put a lot of $ in.

Pull the trigger on these.
post #11 of 24

Trimming my quiver with the L8000

For '07/08 my quiver included Volkl AC4 and Dynastar C11. Near the end of the season I got the chance to ski the '08 Legend. I found it not as fast or burly as the AC4s nor as quick and agile as the C11s. But it did cover that spectrum impressively well, and most importantly it also skied bumps very well.

I don't understand the modern deemphasis on bump skiing. The ski mags don't even include it as a performance category anymore. In my experience skiing regularly at a good sized western resort, if we spend the day skiing any of the challenging terrain, we are constantly in and out of the bumps. Almost all of the steeper terrain ends up eventually developing bumps. Like it or not, its a big part of skiing advanced terrain and I've come to the conclusion that its important for a good all mountain ski to perform well in the bumps.

With this reasoning, I got the '07/08 Legend from an ebay dealer with integrated bindings for $429 (shipping incl). I feel that this ski will be my everyday/all day ski and then I have a 105mm for my powder days.
post #12 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by snofun3 View Post
Apparently you missed the dozens of other threads that would vehemantly disagree with those statements (as would I). Either you haven't really been on them, or.... And getting "thrown in slop" - please - if you have a need to shill for Head that's fine, but c'mon.

Get the 8k's

..
.

What he said. To say they are "adequate" is really underselling the 8K's. I find them to be a terrific everywhere. They can be made to do short turns, long carves and anything in between, regardless of snow condition. Their only downside is they have a speed limit, though it is pretty high.

I'm your size and ski the 178, bought from SAC for $270. Were I out west I would want a size larger.

For $160 it's a no brainer.
post #13 of 24
An incredible deal on a great one-ski quiver. L8000 is simply an amazingly versatile mid-fat. I skied mine in every imaginable condition- including New England boilerplate, Alta powder and everything in between at Squaw. It does it all amazingly well for a single ski. It is a light, and quick ski, so if you like Volkl skis a lot, you will not be happy with them. But if you like that kind of a ski, you will be very happy. The hold on the hardpack is quite good, the only conditions when they get nervous is in heavy frozen crud, but pretty much any ski will suck in those conditions.

Even though I moved on to a different ski (Dynastar MRs), I still have my L8Ks and I take them out regularly. This season they are my backup ski/bump ski/rock skis. I am not going to sell them anytime soon. $160 is an incredible price. Mind posting where you can get that?

Alex



Quote:
Originally Posted by aschick View Post
So, it looks like they have finally hit quadruple clearance. Is the newer 8000 with a modified sidecut and fluid integrated binding so much better, or should I just get these and pay another $100 for the PX12 Lifter?

A related Question: For my wife, (petite, 5'4" 105 lbs) who skis pretty laid back would the legend 3800 in 158 be appropriate (I suppose the buinding could be mounted slightly forward) It's currently at $110 flat.

Thanks for the input.
post #14 of 24
I posted here recently that I demoed the new 8Ks along with some other skis. I didn't have any intention of demoing them but I'm glad I did. Conditions were east coast s-c-r-a-t-c-h-y. The edge hold put my K2 PEs to shame and outperformed the new Dynastar 4x4s I demoed that day (flame away 4x4 lovers). I'm not going to be able to resist buying these but I'm patiently waiting for the right deal.
post #15 of 24
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the input guys, the deal is at sierra trading post. This morning they released a code for an additional 25% off clearance. I opted for the 178, hopefully it won't own me!
post #16 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by aschick View Post
Thanks for the input guys, the deal is at sierra trading post. This morning they released a code for an additional 25% off clearance. I opted for the 178, hopefully it won't own me!
Ah, yes, STP, home of the "Escheresque" new binding arrangements (this is from their web page...)...
post #17 of 24
WTF?
post #18 of 24
Wow- That is an incredible price for a great ski.

Edit for props on a good decision!
post #19 of 24
One thing that hasn't been mentioned is that if you have the 8k, you won't need to rent the B83. Unless you intentionally want something that is more damp and forgiving, the Dynastar will outperform the Rossi (which I demoed) in every way. If you still want to rent, I would go with something much wider.

I got my 8k (same year) at a very good price but nothing like $160. I mounted them flat with Marker bindings and they have been working great. Without the lifter, it keeps the skis lighter without compromising stability. They are not the fastest ski as you wouldn't expect them to be, but they are adequate for my need as I'm not a fast skier. The only time I would switch to my stiffer skis (Atomic SX-10) is when I'm skiing on a sheer sheet of ice but even then it's really not necessary. The only time I find the 8k deficient is inside trees with a deep (foot or more) or crusted cover. Then again, that may have everything to do with my ability.
post #20 of 24
If you want a wide carver, I agree that skis like the Nordica Hot Rods and volkl shark / AC and a few others have much better grip and more top end performance than the 8K. The 8K is more of a traditional mid fat in that it gives great performance at typical speeds (even on real ice) and gives more front side versatility than most other skis. The 8K is a sweet mogul ski and works very well in all but the most gnar off piste conditions (deep pow or deep heavy or icy mank crud.) And it is super easy to ski.
post #21 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by alexzn View Post
Ah, yes, STP, home of the "Escheresque" new binding arrangements (this is from their web page...)...
Escheresque bindings also require Escher boots, and it helps to have the Escher goggles to see how to step in...
post #22 of 24
Thread Starter 
Thanks to everyone who recommended the 8k. December 24-25 at Killington was a a real mix of conditions. I felt noticeable more confident on crud, frozen mashed potatoes, frozen hardpack, bumps etc. Laying over the ski from edge to edge was not much harder than in a dedicated carving ski. The biggest difference was that the narrower turned up tail didn't hold the carve as long through the arc. But the plus was that you could vary the turn shape with much greater ease and disengage the turn more easily for choppier conditions. No real powder to be found. I can see why this ski gets so many props as a great all around ski for the east coast. I also definitely agree that it skis short. Glad I didn't go shorter than the 178.
post #23 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by aschick View Post
Thanks to everyone who recommended the 8k. December 24-25 at Killington was a a real mix of conditions. I felt noticeable more confident on crud, frozen mashed potatoes, frozen hardpack, bumps etc. Laying over the ski from edge to edge was not much harder than in a dedicated carving ski. The biggest difference was that the narrower turned up tail didn't hold the carve as long through the arc. But the plus was that you could vary the turn shape with much greater ease and disengage the turn more easily for choppier conditions. No real powder to be found. I can see why this ski gets so many props as a great all around ski for the east coast. I also definitely agree that it skis short. Glad I didn't go shorter than the 178.
Glad you like it - it's a blast most everywhere.

Like you've indicated and Tromano said above, it can do many different turns kinds and shapes, vs. the more specialized skis like the Volkl and Nordika, which is probably why fossils like myself enjoy it so much- we can do old style just fine (including an occasional skid), but it'll also rail like an express train if your thighs are up for it, or turn into a tree ski in an instant.

As you get used to them, trying diving onto the tips to get them to really snap. It's a "touch" ski, and performs amazingly with a soft input, but will also snarl when you work them hard.

And don't undersell it as western ski either - I keep a pair at Whistler for when a lot of fresh hasn't fallen and it's always a blast. One of the top 3 (2?) skis in my 40+ years on the hill.
post #24 of 24
I skied the L8k on really hardpack today with some death cookies mixed in. It handled just fine on most moderate slopes except for the steeper stuff. I felt it being much less stable so I resorted in survival mode several times. I'm sure much of that was me.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Gear Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › Worth buying Legend 8000 ('06, Flat) for $160