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Where are all the media people at?

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
Seems like nobody uses this forum. Lets talk setups.

Right now i have a Canon D40 with the kit lens, debating between a new zoome lens (55-200mm) or a sweet wide angle. The thing about the wide angle is i shoot a lot of skating and, skiing wise it would be a good amount of TP type stuff.

So my question is, what setups are you guys using? And what settings do you like to use when shooting? I know, obviously a faster shutter speed. But I would assume white balance would be tough, especially when you get into flash and such at night. Let's get this forum going with some good information that both beginners and experts can use.
post #2 of 16
I shoot with Olympus gear (E-510 the 2 fairly good kit lenses and 35mm macro), haven't had this set up out on the slopes yet though.

I don't worry too much about WB when out shooting, because I always shoot RAW and take care of WB when I get home. Purchasing Lightroom was one of the smartest moves I ever made, it speeds this process up a lot. If you are all affiliated with a college (student/staff/faculty) you can legitimately own if for $99.

I think that a good (moderately) wide angle is actually a good choice for skiing and skating. Shooting with a tele from far back is tough with moving objects, you need some seriously fast exposure times to avoid blur. With a wide angle you do need to get in close and risk life and limb, but overall I think you can come out with a better shot if done right. I just like the sense of depth you can get from a wide angle. I think this is far easier with skating than skiing though
post #3 of 16
roccityroller, good thead starter. I just set myself up for shooting skiing with a canon 40d and a 70-200 f4L IS. I figured I'd have plenty of light in skiing shots, so f4 would be fine. Got the IS for versatility beyond action shooting. I think the length will work OK. I want my skiers to fill the frame, and I don't want to be on top of them to do it.

Some suggested I go even longer, say 100-300. With proper set-ups I don't think I'll miss the extra lenght, and the image quality on the 70-200 is suppose to be superlative.
post #4 of 16
Thread Starter 
Is that the NIkon 70-200?

I think you would be more than fine with that lens, should be plenty. I usually like to stay at the lower end of the length spectrum, you just need to remember that, as you increase your focal length (zoom in) you want to reduce your shutter since the increased zoom makes the camera more susceptible to user shake, and thus, shitty blurry pictures. Idk about you but i can't stand ANY blur on my pictures.
post #5 of 16
Canon 40d, Canon 70-200 f4L IS lens. Nikon calls their stabilization feature VR, I believe.

As to faster shutter speed, what speed range are you suggesting, and how high would you you go with ISO to allow for it? Suppose what ISO settings are acceptable depends on the camera/sensor, and the use the shot is meant for.

The lens has an IS pan mode on it. Going to be interesting to try some hand held panning shots, following the skier, in that mode and see how it does compared with non IS pod shots.
post #6 of 16
Thread Starter 
I would like to see how those come out too.

I, personally, prefer faster shutter speed and a lower ISO. Less noise but you still get a crisp shot (if your lighting allows it). Remember, I've never shot skiing, only skating and random scenery so, for skating i like the faster shutter speed since the subject is usually the good majority of the photo. I like everything crisp in my photos and, thus, i usually stay at the faster range, if possible.
post #7 of 16
For panning shots, I have found something that works great.

I have a fluid "video" head (some model of Bogen) on my tripod. It is designed for larger consumer camcorders, but works great for panning action shots with a DSLR. Much smoother than a ball head or other head meant to be kept stationary.

The only disadvantage to this type of head is doesn't allow me to flip for portrait orientation, but there are attachments that could facilitate this.
post #8 of 16
Rick, a little tip on IS/VR...
Switch it off if the shutter speed is faster than 1/250th (or there abouts). It's pretty much redundant at higher speeds, and apart from using up a lot of battery power, it can create a blur, rather than remove it.

(Also, switch it off if you're using a tripod - if you're concerned about camera shake due to pressing the button when on a tripod, then use the self timer)
post #9 of 16
Thread Starter 
Self timer is clutch for long exposure tripod shots. Unfortuneately, the lowest ST my D40 will hit is 10 seconds. I need to find a remote for it to make it easier.
post #10 of 16
You can get them on ebay for about $10
post #11 of 16
Thread Starter 
yea i gotta pick up one of those and a new external flash. That'll be my christmas present to myself
post #12 of 16
This is my flash - great on the SLR, looks a bit ridiculous on the compact...

post #13 of 16
Thread Starter 
Now, THAT'S what I'm talking about! haha
post #14 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wear The Fox Hat View Post
Rick, a little tip on IS/VR...
Switch it off if the shutter speed is faster than 1/250th (or there abouts). It's pretty much redundant at higher speeds, and apart from using up a lot of battery power, it can create a blur, rather than remove it.

(Also, switch it off if you're using a tripod - if you're concerned about camera shake due to pressing the button when on a tripod, then use the self timer)
Thanks, Fox, I'll keep the shutter/IS connection in mind. Santa is bringing a wireless remote for removing pod shot shake.
post #15 of 16
Canon 40D
Canon 400D (Rebel XTi)

Canon 300L 2.8
Canon 70-200L 2.8
Canon 70-200L 4.0
Canon 28-70L 2.8
Canon EF 15-55
post #16 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by roccityroller View Post
Seems like nobody uses this forum. Lets talk setups.

Right now i have a Canon D40 with the kit lens, debating between a new zoome lens (55-200mm) or a sweet wide angle. The thing about the wide angle is i shoot a lot of skating and, skiing wise it would be a good amount of TP type stuff.

So my question is, what setups are you guys using? And what settings do you like to use when shooting? I know, obviously a faster shutter speed. But I would assume white balance would be tough, especially when you get into flash and such at night. Let's get this forum going with some good information that both beginners and experts can use.
Roller, did you mean Nikon D40 or Canon 40D?
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