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Getting wireless on two wheels

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
post #2 of 17
Both Shimano and Campy have been working on this stuff for a long time. The reports I have read from the racers using the Campy stuff (still in prototype) is they love it. Shifts are lightning fast and can be made with full power applied to the cranks. Whether the general riding enthusiast is willing to through out the dough for the technology is another story.
post #3 of 17
The DA stuff is supposed to be amazing.

edit: It's not wireless though.
post #4 of 17
Either of you play with Mektronic or Zap when it was out?

OMG that's almost 20 years ago now.
post #5 of 17
Anyone remember the Shimano Airlines system?

http://www.bikeman.com/attic/whatizit8.htm
post #6 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by comprex View Post
Either of you play with Mektronic or Zap when it was out?

OMG that's almost 20 years ago now.
No, but I saw a NOS Mektronic gruppo on Ebay a while back. I thought about buying it, but my better judgement won out.
post #7 of 17
Next they'll be selling jammers to screw up your competitions wireless derailleurs.
post #8 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rio View Post
Next they'll be selling jammers to screw up your competitions wireless derailleurs.
The better HR monitors are already privacy-coded.
post #9 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by comprex View Post
The better HR monitors are already privacy-coded.
Yeah, but see what happens when you ride by a major airport!!
post #10 of 17
I've seen the press articles about the new electric Shimano DuraAce before. As mentioned above, the racers seem to love it. I do all my own bike maintenance, and it takes a while to get 10-speed systems shifting perfectly, and they're pretty finnicky about staying perfect as well. Campy and Shimano needed to do something about the finnicky-ness of the systems as it would only get worse as more-and-more gears get packed onto the rear wheel (i.e., Campy has 11-speed rear cassettes now, which must be truly night-marish to get shifting perfectly). So from that aspect (i.e., ease of setup, keeping it shifting perfectly) -- I'm all for moving to an electric system.

I would be worried about what happens when the battery goes dead. From the original article, it appears that you can easily get 2,000 mlies while the manual says 600-something. Just have to get in the habit of re-charging batteries or carrying a spare battery with you. I've had mechanical derailleurs go bye-bye on me mid-ride before, so it's not like the old system was perfect either.

Basically, I think it's an intriguing breakthrough, with lots of upsides and not many downsides. I'm not about to shell out two grand for a little more convenience though.
post #11 of 17
They've thought out the dead battery problem pretty well. I think first it slows down then it drops the chain to the granny ring and when all is lost it shifts to the biggest cog. It sounds like you'll know it's dying before it dies.
post #12 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post
They've thought out the dead battery problem pretty well. I think first it slows down then it drops the chain to the granny ring and when all is lost it shifts to the biggest cog. It sounds like you'll know it's dying before it dies.
I'd hate to be 300 meters from the finish line in a bunch sprint when that happens
post #13 of 17
It shouldn't unless you are in a 2000 mile race.
post #14 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roadrash View Post
I'd hate to be 300 meters from the finish line in a bunch sprint when that happens
Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post
It shouldn't unless you are in a 2000 mile race.
Hmmmmm, Tour de France is about 2000 miles. Ends in a bunch sprint on the Champs Elysees. Hopefully no team mechanic forgets to replace the batteries.
post #15 of 17
It'll be interesting to see how the pro peleton takes to it.
post #16 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by KevinF View Post
Hmmmmm, Tour de France is about 2000 miles. Ends in a bunch sprint on the Champs Elysees. Hopefully no team mechanic forgets to replace the batteries.
I was thinking PBP or BMB or RAAM, but yeah.




I actually dreamt about an electronic Cyclo last night.

http://www.m-gineering.nl/oldtechg.htm
post #17 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by KevinF View Post
Hmmmmm, Tour de France is about 2000 miles. Ends in a bunch sprint on the Champs Elysees. Hopefully no team mechanic forgets to replace the batteries.
You obviously haven't heard about the 'solar-cell helmet' accessory. Put it on, plug it in, and no more battery worries
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