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How often should I wax my skis?

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
I ski about 2 times a week on groomed trails, and spend a an hour or so in the park on boxes and what not every time i go, how often should i wax my skis under these conditions? I was curious as to how much grinding will take away from the wax on my skis. thanks!
post #2 of 17
As often as you feel like.

Do you do it yourself? If so, then more is better... but it won't make your skis last longer or anything, they'll just glide better. Ski 2x a week? wax once a week or every other week or so.

If you take them to a shop, well, stop and spend the money on an iron and some basic wax and do it yourself... more often.
post #3 of 17
Is it natural snow or blown snow?? Waxing once a week would be a good idea but the best way to figure out when your skis need wax is look at the bases, if the edges are starting to get dried out (they'll look white/ashy compared to the rest of the base) then they need wax.
post #4 of 17
Like he said wax seems to last long on natural snow. I have found the general rule for us on the east coast is every 3 or 4 ski day's. You'll learn how to dip just enough on so you don't waste to much.

Just keep the iron on the cooler side of hot so the wax doesn't smoke.

Check out some of the shop's on this site and support them. There's lots of good info that these guy's pass out for free.

Buying from them is a way of saying thanks for the help.
post #5 of 17
I think the hour or so on the park boxes will be harder on the wax than the natural snow.
post #6 of 17
If you're doing rails and boxes, I don't think wax really comes into play much.

I wax AT LEAST once for every three days on snow - usually more often since I have a decent quiver and I enjoy working on my gear.
post #7 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by dynamite196 View Post
Is it natural snow or blown snow?? Waxing once a week would be a good idea but the best way to figure out when your skis need wax is look at the bases, if the edges are starting to get dried out (they'll look white/ashy compared to the rest of the base) then they need wax.
On manmade snow I can get white/ashy edges after just a day or two of skiing, especially directly under the boot. When you start to do your own waxing you'll figure out pretty quickly when they need it.
post #8 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by ts01 View Post
On manmade snow I can get white/ashy edges after just a day or two of skiing, especially directly under the boot. When you start to do your own waxing you'll figure out pretty quickly when they need it.
You might try applying a very hard HC wax, about 1/2" along the edges where you see this happening.

In general, snow abrasiveness and wax quality will affect frequency. It be interesting to hear how park activiities affect wax durability or make it moot. Maybe going to a harder wax is worth considering, at least as a base to the wax of the day.
post #9 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alpinord View Post
You might try applying a very hard HC wax, about 1/2" along the edges where you see this happening.
Hardest I have is Swix CH4 - would that do it? Hard to work with but tough as nails, and once it's on it seems to STAY on.

Otherwise, I've got some Racewax green HC or Toko universal (white), which is what I think was on there in the first place.

May be exacerbating the problem by really pressuring edges underfoot to get a grip on boilerplate, or for stability while tips are knocked about by loose heavy manmade.
post #10 of 17
What you have is worth a try. I'm not sure about actual hardness comparisons, but I'm pretty sure that the Maplus Race Base Hard is about as hard of a wax you can buy. It's like scraping epoxy. I'd think your options are are right up there and experimenting with each along different edges is an option.
post #11 of 17
I dont know if I would even bother to wax my skis if I was abusing them in the terrain park. My .02 But if youre gonna do it, Id say wax after every day you mess around on the features/boxes, rails etc..
post #12 of 17
IMO CH4 is a little more brittle and slower/finickier at penetrating into bases than Maplus RB-Hard.

If you've got black bases, you might consider swapping out that Toko uni-white for Toko uni-moly.
post #13 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by comprex View Post
IMO CH4 is a little more brittle and slower/finickier at penetrating into bases than Maplus RB-Hard.

If you've got black bases, you might consider swapping out that Toko uni-white for Toko uni-moly.
I'll give the Maplus a try, the CH4 needs real high heat and is a pain in the neck to scrape. You mean this one, with graphite: http://www.slidewright.com/proddetail.php?prod=MW0620
or this one: http://www.slidewright.com/proddetail.php?prod=MW0600? Or something else entirely? Terry?

Have (mostly) black bases - but also have 3 giant bricks of the Toko uni white. You mean this one : http://www.reliableracing.com/detail.cfm?edp=10617389?
What are the advantages? Is it a flourocarbon wax? (Assume not at the $10 price).
post #14 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by ts01 View Post
I'll give the Maplus a try, the CH4 needs real high heat and is a pain in the neck to scrape. You mean this one, with graphite: http://www.slidewright.com/proddetail.php?prod=MW0620
or this one: http://www.slidewright.com/proddetail.php?prod=MW0600?
The sample T. sent me to play with did -not- have graphite in it. I thought it was nice enuff for what it was, but the hard-setting liquid was so much easier to work with that I pretty much latched onto that, gave most of my CH4 away, and started using Race Base Medium for everything else.

(Tip for using up the rest of what you have: grind it or grate it into a powder then sprinkle into your usual wax).

Quote:
Have (mostly) black bases - but also have 3 giant bricks of the Toko uni white. You mean this one : http://www.reliableracing.com/detail.cfm?edp=10617389?
What are the advantages? Is it a flourocarbon wax? (Assume not at the $10 price).
It has molybdenum sulfide in it, acts as dry lube. Nice travel wax too, because it crayons on nicely for hotel room corking.

As a side note, you might be able to combine some dry lube with your current bricks. I really don't think Toko do much fancy processing on this uni-grade stuff, you could probably do as well. Back when we were doing the solar waxing experiments I put a line of Toko uni-moly down a pair of bases. After a day in late May sun the clear wax was 3cm wide and the dark dry lube was still only as wide as the drip line.
post #15 of 17
Thanks Comprex.

Hard-setting liquid = another slidewright product?
post #16 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by ts01 View Post
Hard-setting liquid = another slidewright product?
Yeah.

Advantage: no heat and no scrape, spread and done and rock hard.

Disadvantage: not teh cheeps, smelly, can't travel with it.
post #17 of 17
TS01, The Maplus Race Bases are hydrocarbon/paraffin or HC/paraffin with graphite.

I was just thinking the Maplus RB Hard, but a down side of using the graphite doesn't come to mind. A trick for applying very hard solids is hot touching/crayoning for a very thin layer to reduce scraping and brushing. If you do get over zealous, you can soak up any excess with a shop towel or fiberlene between iron and base. I ended up using a metal scraper and metal brush, last time I use the stuff.

Hey comprex, did you get any RB Soft? I thought a fun experiment would be to blend the RB soft & hard to see how it compared to the medium and lean it one way or the other depending on temperature. I'm liking the soft for initial saturation (followed with med) and spring. The med is my hands down favorite. Worked great today.
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