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Crimson Ti for glades?

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
Hi...
I have been trying to get some solid advice... but it has been pretty hard. This is my first post. This site has the knowledge that I'm looking after. Umn... I'm 23 years old, I ski in Tahoe, but I grew up skiing in Austria and Switzerland. I have been skiiing at level 9 (according to your site) for several years. I've saved up my money and want to get some new skis. I spend all my time on the backside. If it takes 45 minutes to get down a steep tree covered powder drenched run me and my brother (snowboarder...) are the happiest. I like to ski aggressively. My skis now are too thin for powder, I mean it's possible and an amazing feeling to float through that, but also kind of a chore. I want some of these fatter skis that "feel like cheating" I went to Any Mountain and I noticed that the TIs were MUCH stiffer and a little heavier than other skis they had. I hear that they are very high performance... I like the sound of that. My question is do you think that they will hold up if you're making short turns in tight spaces. hop turns and such.

5'10 180.

And completely unrelated... who knows what my current skis are? They are Rossignol, completely gray with a metal "stabilizer" thing between the bindings and tip... they came out with green beginner and red expert versions of the same ski. About 6 years old or so. Good all around skis.

Anyways pretty long post appreciate all feedback.
post #2 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Reinhard View Post
And completely unrelated... who knows what my current skis are? They are Rossignol, completely gray with a metal "stabilizer" thing between the bindings and tip... they came out with green beginner and red expert versions of the same ski. About 6 years old or so. Good all around skis.
.

Rossi CUT 10.6?
post #3 of 16
first - what in your opinion makes a ski high performance in glades?

second - what other skis have you looked at?

disclaimer I have never skied this ski

my only real concern about those ski is the 'cap construction" there is nothing wrong with cap in particular except one thing. The edges are impossible to repair if you ever twang them hard enough off a rock or stump. I have owned Metron B5, sl9, sl11, and 2 pairs of sugar Daddy's every single one of those skis lives ended with a broken edge of some sort. an impossible to repair broken edge. My snoops which I baby are the only cap atomics that havent broken an edge on my yet.

If you want atomics with out the edge breaking problem, I would look at the newest Snoop. which with their wide twin tip terrain and 94 mm waist will be better tree skis than the Crismion Ti.

http://www.atomicsnow.com/us/home/pr...oop-daddy.html

go with the 184.
post #4 of 16
Thread Starter 
you're right in a way that there is no "performance" in the glades.... you don't ski very fast and usually don't have a surface to edge on either.

I think what I want is a ski that I can ski aggressively down the steep and deep, but has the width and agility to be right at home in the trees and powder. So either a long powerful ski that can turn well, or a short ski that has a high speed limit.

Mainly though I really want an unforgiving ski. That's because I want to keep it for a long time, and because it makes it harder to keep up bad habits. Bad habits that I probably don't know I have because my skis let me keep them. But I think in general people are very reluctant to recommend this kind of ski.

i've definitely looked at the snoops only thing is that they seem so soft... I think that they would be very fun to ride on but I'm not sure if that's what I want.

*knock on wood* I've never damaged any of my skis though.
post #5 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Reinhard View Post
you're right in a way that there is no "performance" in the glades.... you don't ski very fast and usually don't have a surface to edge on either.
there is performance in glades but it comes from softer skis that have moderate sidecut. A stiffer, more shaped skied tend to get hung up in tight places and not let you slip your edges at all.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Reinhard View Post
I think what I want is a ski that I can ski aggressively down the steep and deep, but has the width and agility to be right at home in the trees and powder. So either a long powerful ski that can turn well, or a short ski that has a high speed limit.
you make some blanket statements here. You can ski anything down the steep and deep 'aggressively" .


Quote:
Originally Posted by Reinhard View Post
Mainly though I really want an unforgiving ski. That's because I want to keep it for a long time, and because it makes it harder to keep up bad habits. Bad habits that I probably don't know I have because my skis let me keep them. But I think in general people are very reluctant to recommend this kind of ski.
unforgiving skis can and do build bad habits just as much a soft easier to ski; ski. You want whats exactly right for you, not to much not to little. the key to skiing well is skiing well. if you think skiing an unforgiving ski is a magic bullet to skiing better. Your idea is both horribly misguided and masochistic at the same time.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Reinhard View Post
i've definitely looked at the snoops only thing is that they seem so soft... I think that they would be very fun to ride on but I'm not sure if that's what I want.

*knock on wood* I've never damaged any of my skis though.
I have no clue what you want. I only suggested the Snoops because it is my opinion the best all around EVERYDAY tree ski for someone out west thats made by atomic. Also I am talking about the new snoops which ski quite a bit different than the old cap models.

Just remember skis are tools. tools are suppose to make what you want to do easier. Not make it difficult.
post #6 of 16
If you want an unforgiving ski to practice skiing on that is not what you want to be skiing off piste for years. Skis that are good for off piste (i.e. powder, crud, glades, etc... ) usually are more forgiving. I would go with something medium to soft flex that is fairly wide but not huge (90-110mm under foot) and it should be a ski that you feel really comfortable on. As for length if you plan on skiing tighter trees go a bit on the short side, try around 180cm.
post #7 of 16
Thread Starter 
thanks for all the info... I really know nothing about skis.
post #8 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Reinhard View Post
thanks for all the info... I really know nothing about skis.
You have gotten some great input already about unforgiving skis. Here are some general thoughts about your quandry. Choosing a ski is alwzys a compromise in some form or other. You talk about glades, slashing steep and deep, powder, etc. etc. All of these conditions suggest differing ski characteristics.

The Crimson Ti is a burly ski that despite it's width is really more of a hard snow biased ski. Like other stiff skis in this width category, it will shine on hard snow if you can stay on it, punch crud passably well and will not excell in powder. If you want an unforgiving ski, that's a good choice.

I might suggest an alternative approach........................

Check out the Starthaus Ski Deal #1 thread. You will see that you could buy a Nordica Top Fuel w/binding and a Nordica Enforcer with binding for less money than the Crimson. This would give you both a ripping frontsider and a nice medium flex backsider.

Better coverage of your needs for less $$$$.

SJ
post #9 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by SierraJim View Post
You have gotten some great input already about unforgiving skis. Here are some general thoughts about your quandry. Choosing a ski is alwzys a compromise in some form or other. You talk about glades, slashing steep and deep, powder, etc. etc. All of these conditions suggest differing ski characteristics.

The Crimson Ti is a burly ski that despite it's width is really more of a hard snow biased ski. Like other stiff skis in this width category, it will shine on hard snow if you can stay on it, punch crud passably well and will not excell in powder. If you want an unforgiving ski, that's a good choice.

I might suggest an alternative approach........................

Check out the Starthaus Ski Deal #1 thread. You will see that you could buy a Nordica Top Fuel w/binding and a Nordica Enforcer with binding for less money than the Crimson. This would give you both a ripping frontsider and a nice medium flex backsider.

Better coverage of your needs for less $$$$.

SJ
great advice to great skis for less than the cost of one ski thats not great for the OP needs.
post #10 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Reinhard View Post
thanks for all the info... I really know nothing about skis.
Was I right?
post #11 of 16
Thread Starter 
comprex: i screwed that up for you. They are Nordicas.
post #12 of 16
Ah. That explains it (and makes it easier). I secretly assumed you were off on the (6) years by 2.

are they Nordica 9.1s? 74mm waist or 68mm?
post #13 of 16
A stiff ski is no guarantee of longevity.

In glades, I'd want something wider than the Crimson TI, and more flexible.

BWPA is correct, there's no point in tree-skiing on a carver, which the TI is.

I'd look for something in a 90mm to 100mm width - not just due to the wider width, but because they're designed with more off-piste bias.

The Snoop Daddy is a good suggestion, so is the Nordica Enforcer or Volkl Manta.

The Mantra may be the stiffest of the 3.
post #14 of 16
Thread Starter 
Comprex:
Nordica Next 9.0 great skis
post #15 of 16
I'm having a flashback to Louise in March of '01, poor snow late in the year, moguls everywhere. Ah, yes, I remember skiing that ski both at LL and at Panorama; mostly I remember being socked in at the top of Louise and then being amazed at how fast the snow on top the skis melted as we skied down into the sun.

Thanks for the memories .
post #16 of 16
Thread Starter 

I ended up getting those skis on the cheap. Only thing to note might be that I got some Look PX bindings. In any case, great skis of course. I had to learn to lean forward more, which makes sense since I had more width underneath. One day there was a little fresh powder at Alpine Meadows... they have a backside "sun bowl" where the snow gets packed from sun and wind... these skis were AMAZING in those conditions. They gripped and carved through the packed powder and crud.

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