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Skiing fat skis

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
I couldn't find any good posts regarding skiing fat skis. I don't know if anybody has any hints/tips, or links.

I am used to skiing 75mm skis. This year I purchased my first wide ski for west-coast skiing (2 trips x 1week /year). I have not really ridden fat skis before, but am really looking forward to skiing them in some softer snow.

My experience so far, is that I took my gotamas out on some ice/hard pack this past week just to "try out". Needless to say, I don't think they were really made for icier conditions. I didn't feel as though I was in control as much as my mid-fat'ish skis.

Any suggestions, or things I should work on/think about for when I am using these skis? At this point I plan on bringing both skis with me on trips...at least until I get really good on the fatties...
post #2 of 10
Really not trying to be a jackass:

1) Try skiing them on snow that's not boilerplate ice. They really weren't made for that kind of thing.

...conversely -

2) Ski them more on hard snow. This is really the only way to learn the subtleties of how to make a wider ski work ok on snow they weren't really designed for.

Other than that, I really don't think there's any kind of special technique involved for skiing wider skis.
post #3 of 10
You have to expect that the skis are going to take a little longer to put onto edge. So you might feel like the skis are skidding, but you just need to be a little more patient in waiting for them to come around.
post #4 of 10
What Jer said.

You might need to get used to feeling so high up when you're on edge, although if you're moving from a lifted binding ski, the changes isn't as dramatic.

Other than that, on packed snow, good technique continues to be rewarded. On soft snow, traditional good soft snow techniques are rewarded, but more positively.
post #5 of 10
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jer View Post
Really not trying to be a jackass:

1) Try skiing them on snow that's not boilerplate ice. They really weren't made for that kind of thing.

...conversely -

2) Ski them more on hard snow. This is really the only way to learn the subtleties of how to make a wider ski work ok on snow they weren't really designed for.

Other than that, I really don't think there's any kind of special technique involved for skiing wider skis.

Not a jackass at all...

I wasn't expecting an amazing experience on the icy hardpack with these... I more or less wanted to try them out.

I figure I might try them out a couple more times on the harder stuff, just to as you say, get a feel for them a bit more

thanks!
post #6 of 10
Actually, certain fatter skis can be lots of fun on hard snow. I've got a pair of 193 Head m103s that ski exactly like a pair of old 223cm DH boards on hard snow. The Gotama, not so much - although for a 105mm ski it does a pretty good job. One thing pretty much any large waisted ski will not do is carve rapid-fire short radius turns.
post #7 of 10
Birdblaster,


When I switch to my wide skis on ice. It takes me a while to get them to stop skidding and carve. I have to play with my for/aft balance a little and also have to get then on edge very high (early)in the turn.

RW
post #8 of 10
Thread Starter 
So lucky me...it snowed like crazy last night and today. So I went skiing...I think it came down at least 1-2ft while I was skiing, and I thought what a perfect time to use my powder boards....

Skiing fat skis is much easier with the right snow...it was AWESOME! So much fun, and I cannot wait to take them out again in the right conditions!
post #9 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bird Blaster View Post
So lucky me...it snowed like crazy last night and today. So I went skiing...I think it came down at least 1-2ft while I was skiing, and I thought what a perfect time to use my powder boards....

Skiing fat skis is much easier with the right snow...it was AWESOME! So much fun, and I cannot wait to take them out again in the right conditions!
yeah those gotama will be great in anything but boilerplate ice.

a couple inches and what was dust on crust before on your old skis becomes fun when you dont hit the bottom.

FYI on hardpack try really getting on the outside ski, this seemed to work best when on 100mmish skis.
post #10 of 10
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post

FYI on hardpack try really getting on the outside ski, this seemed to work best when on 100mmish skis.

There were a couple of wind swept areas there were more barren of fresh snow, and I tried to really get them up on edge, and the outside, like you mentioned. It did make it much more enjoyable, and they gotamas actually held up pretty well.
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