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post #1 of 15
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post #2 of 15
This is a fascinating project.

The quantitative data the system presents are impressive, and I can think of many ways in which it can be immediately used for qualitative analysis.

My question is, how do you take this dataset and determine quantitatively what techniques and tactics the skier should employ to improve performance.
post #3 of 15
It's a good question, Garrett.

Seems to be a work in progress, so I'm witholding my final judgement FTTB. So far Brodie seems to have proved that you slow down as you ascend the virtual bump, and speed up as you descend it, and that the outside ski tends to receive the greater load. I'll need more than that. There are so many variables that affect bottom line performance. To be of real value, it will have to deliver more than that which a good coaches eye already can. We'll see.
post #4 of 15
I think the project has alredy lots of useful information for both skiers, instructors and coaches. Dissclaimer, some will not understand much of it no matter how much science you put into it.
post #5 of 15
It is basically done with "Dartfish" to see and compare all those things.

But it is certainly an interesting way to see things. All the basics are there, the actual skier could be better.

But since we do not have the "Blue Monster" in our team, I may have to pass on that one for now.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Rick View Post
It's a good question, Garrett.

Seems to be a work in progress, so I'm witholding my final judgement FTTB. So far Brodie seems to have proved that you slow down as you ascend the virtual bump, and speed up as you descend it, and that the outside ski tends to receive the greater load. I'll need more than that. There are so many variables that affect bottom line performance. To be of real value, it will have to deliver more than that which a good coaches eye already can. We'll see.
post #6 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by simplyfast View Post
But it is certainly an interesting way to see things. All the basics are there, the actual skier could be better.
Just for your information, that is a good skier.
post #7 of 15
To some it is to some it is not. That is all relative, is it not? In any case as I said it would be great if the skier would be better.


Quote:
Originally Posted by tdk6 View Post
Just for your information, that is a good skier.
post #8 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by simplyfast View Post
To some it is to some it is not. That is all relative, is it not? In any case as I said it would be great if the skier would be better.
How good?
post #9 of 15
Where do we get a good video of the actual skier, so we can evaluate the level of the skier being used as the subject? I was wondering about that as I was watching StickMan.
post #10 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rick View Post
Where do we get a good video of the actual skier, so we can evaluate the level of the skier being used as the subject? I was wondering about that as I was watching StickMan.
Here:
http://www.bengriffin.co.nz/
post #11 of 15
Even a 'Good' skier can ski well or ski poorly at any given moment. I imagine skiing with a bunch of potentially restrictive gear strapped all around you is a bit distracting.

It may also affect your skiing performance to have a few thousand dollars of somebody else's electronics and sensors hanging all over your body.

Even so, the test results need to be qualified by the question we often ask around here: "What were you trying to do?" Were they 'just skiing' or trying to do something in particular? Is the weight distribution shown a result of what the skier considers a 'good run' or a 'bad run' in their own eyes? Which turns should we ignore the data results for because the skier considers those turns a mistake in some way? Which turns felt 'right' to the skier and why?

Raw data is useful but only to the extent that we know the inputs which created it and the quality of the outputs that resulted from those inputs.

.ma
post #12 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by michaelA View Post
It may also affect your skiing performance to have a few thousand dollars of somebody else's electronics and sensors hanging all over your body.
More than a few.

The blue monster and dramatic reading had me laughing out loud. The developer definitely looks like a fun guy to have a beer with.

Rick, at the very least, I can see this kind of motion capture leading to better looking and playing ski games. At the very most, I can see someone using a collection of accurate real world data to develop a general solution to ski technique and path selection. Somewhere between those extremes are probably a lot of useful applications.
post #13 of 15
Ever read Kurt Vonnegut's "Player Piano"?

I'm sure there are many countries that are interested in producing "clones" of "the best skier". What would the data gathered on Raich or Svindal be worth on the open market?
post #14 of 15
Matt Brodie (the guy who did this work) is a MSc candidate in NZ. My last email exchange with him was > 1 year ago, and at that time I wasn't really clear about the focus of his project other than accurate data capture. If memory serves, he was going to present at ICSS '07.

As the technology matures (cheaper, smaller, etc) I'm sure we'll see real world applications for coaching similar to telemetry systems in motorsports.
post #15 of 15
yea maybe they will finally be able to make a semi realistic ski video game after this.
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