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Goodbye Stu Campbell - Page 2

post #31 of 57
Very sad. Condolences to the family.
I never knew him but we're very lucky that epic was fortunate enough to have him for events.
It's amazing the history he knew. Here's a little clip from something I found on line. I have no idea what he's talking about!
http://www.skiinghistory.org/PrevISSUE.html

Quote:
Technique and Teaching: Surviving Schrittbogen
A memoir by Stu Campbell, longtime head of the Stowe Ski School and Ski Magazine technical editor on his days as a college racer in the turmoil of the "reverse revolution" of which schrittbogen was a part., a step turn that put racers in a reverse position..
The story goes on to say that the Kruckenhauser books exaggerated the racers' reverse position, and his description of wedel in the 1957 Austrian Ski Teaching Plan, translated into English in 1958, influential in rethinking American technique and teaching.
First Issue 2002 (March) Vol. 14 #1 Skiing Heritage
post #32 of 57
Thanks for sharing that Tog.
post #33 of 57
Horrible news.

IMO we have lost our greatest ambassador of skiing.

I am as passionate about my Boston Red Sox as I am about our sport of skiing.

This passing is the equivalent of losing Ted Williams to me.

My journey of learning on the pathway to good skiing was guided by Stu Campbell's many writings clarified by Lito Tejado Flores 1st video. I constantly have used his writings over the years, truly the only written words about technique that this visual learner has ever found useful. PSIA "The Way to Ski" (1986) written by Stu Campbell and Max Lundberg and demonstrated by Carol Levine and Jerry Warren was the gateway that kicked off my decade long quest into learning and more importantly understanding what made the modern ski turn and lead me to ITC and a rewarding experience teaching at my local hill. None of this skiing experience would have occured without Mr. Campbell. I truly was a technique junkie. The fact that I now ski without hardly ever thinking about technique myself is a blessing bestowed on me primarily by Stu Campbell. To steal a line from Lito, my skis have become wings.

I will now regret forever that I did not seize the opportunity epicski presented last year to ski with Stu at Stowe. With a new job it just wasn't possible to take the time off. I would like to hear more about it from those of you that were blessed to ski with him.

Fresh tracks for you forever Stu.

....and thank you.
post #34 of 57

Farewell to a friend

How does one start to deal with such a loss?
Stu has been such an integral part of my experience as a ski instructor.
Of the hundreds of runs we have done together, I have indelible memories of so many quiet moments of pleasure and companionship.
Someone asked me today what I recalled most about skiing with Stu.
My response was the silence. We skied so often in companionable quiet, deviating sometimes in our routes because of his back injury, but always meeting again at the lift.
He was part of the "Core 4", of my Fresh Tracks program at Stowe, and was the first person I spoke to when I came up with the idea of the event. He has been part of FT ever since.
I enclose a link to photos of the last public event for Stu, there were so many luminaries both from the skiing side of his life, plus from the writing side.
http://lasamphoto.com/ShowItFiles/stu_campbell.htm

The event was to honor his prowess as a writer....if you have not read "Skiing with the Big Boys" it is definitely worth your while to hunt it down.
At this event which was only a couple of months ago, Stu was amazing! Always able to hold an audience, he captured our attention for 30 minutes of entertaining reminiscences.

So, on Monday, we will gather to bid an inadequate farewell to "A Ski Instructor". That is how he wants to be remembered, he truly was a humble man of great character, a gentleman of class and style.

It is incomprehensible to me that I will never again ride a lift with him, share a coffee with him, or cruise down the mountain trying ineffectually to emulate his special skiing style.


As inadequate as it might be...............

Farewell my friend RIP
post #35 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post
http://www.skiracing.com/index.php?o...881&Ite mid=2

Skiing had a big loss today. Stu was really one of a kind and will be missed by so many. He's really been struggling for a while now, but he's so strong he just couldn't give up until now. He lived to ski. Not just to ski, but to teach skiing. He really rallied to come ski with us at ESA last year. I think he got just as much from his students as they did from him.

It's really easy to be sad about it, but just remembering him makes me smile.

Goodbye Stu.
I was deeply impacted by meeting a ski hero from my youth at the ESA in Snowbird. I was blessed by his generosity in allowing us to do an EpicSki interview with him for a podcast. Although for only a very short time and rarely, I have been imprinted by his kindness, his passion, his zest, his character, and his giving.

I miss you already, Stu. You are in my heart and my soul. Thank you.

Enjoy the slopes of heaven, my friend, and be ready to teach me how to turn 'em when next we meet on the other side.
post #36 of 57
skiswift, thanks for sharing the slideshow.

For those who have not taken advantage of downloading the podcast with Stu, do it. Its worthwhile.
http://forums.epicski.com/showthread.php?t=71183
post #37 of 57
Thank you, Skiswift, for posting the slideshow. The love of his peers was clearly evident, and Stu's grace and humility shined through every photograph. He will be remembered fondly by more people than ever knew him.
post #38 of 57

Stu's Obituary

Stuart Duncan Campbell, 12/26/42 – 12/4/08


Author, skier, Vermont native, Stu Campbell, passed away December 4, 2008, at his home in Stowe after a 20 year battle with cancer. He was 65.

Known throughout the skiing world, Campbell fashioned a career from his own understated elegance, both on skis and with his ability to put words to the act of gliding on snow.

He grew up skiing in Bennington, Vermont, and was a 4-event ski racer (slalom; giant slalom; cross-country; ski jumping) while a student at Middlebury College. He graduated from Middlebury in 1964 with a BA in American Literature and received his master’s degree in English Literature from the University of Vermont in 1972.

Campbell taught English literature and coached skiing at Harwood Union High School and at the Valley Junior Racing Club from 1967-69 before settling in Stowe as Technical Director of the Sepp Ruschp Ski School. Campbell moved from Stowe to Heavenly Valley, California, in the late 1970s, where he served as Director of Skier Services. He oversaw Heavenly’s ski school, other skier services and a very active race department that hosted World Cup, professional and celebrity ski races. He spent more than a dozen winters at Heavenly (though during that time he continued to spend his summers, writing, in Stowe). He returned to Stowe full time in 1997 and led the development, construction and opening of The Country Club of Vermont, pursuing his late-in-life passion for the sport of golf.

Campbell’s extraordinary grasp of the technical elements of skiing and ski teaching led him to positions with the Professional Ski Instructors of America as a Demonstration Team member, as co-chairman of the Technical Committee and as an examiner with PSIA’s Eastern division.

But it was as a writer for Ski Magazine that Campbell mentored the greatest number of skiers. He served as Technical and Instruction Editor at Ski from the mid 1970s until his death, penning everything from illustrated quick tips to feature articles. “The art of skiing,” Campbell wrote in 1991, “is, ultimately, the search for sensation.” He encouraged the reader to use his skis “like a draftsman’s compass” to scribe arcs on snow. He saw skis as “tools for sculpting space on the tilt.”

Campbell also wrote ski instruction books, including Ski With the Big Boys, The Way to Ski, and, with Tim Petrick, Good Things to Know about Gliding on Snow.

Some of his Vermont neighbors knew him best for his books on gardening and alternative house design, including 1975’s Let it Rot!, which helped start the home composting movement, and The Underground House Book (1980). Campbell and his wife Carol West-Campbell lived for 28 years in a radically earth-bermed house in Stowe.

In September, the Vermont Ski Museum awarded Campbell the first Paul Robbins Ski Journalism Award for “lifetime commitment to ski journalism with ethics, humor and good taste. . .” He told the gathering at the museum to “get up on the mountain and make lots and lots and lots of turns. Every turn you make is good for the soul.”

He leaves behind his wife of 23years, Carol West, his mother Helen L. Campbell of Stowe, his brother Alan and his wife Heidi of Huntington, his daughter Cricket Kadoch and her husband Aaron of Bend, Oregon, and his son Gregory of Waterbury, along with 2 grandsons, Aiden Jacob Duncan and Joshua Stuart Asher, 3 nephews, Mason, Abbott and Owen Rachampbell and an aunt, Virginia Thomas of Bakersfield.

Services will be held at the Stowe Community Church on Monday, December 8th at 11:00am.
post #39 of 57
Welcome, Gregory. We hope that our condolences alleviate at least a little bit of your grief. Your father was a great man!
post #40 of 57
This is so sad. My sincere condolences to Stu's entire family.
post #41 of 57
Gregory, thank you for sharing your dad with us.
For that we are richly blessed.
post #42 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post
Gregory, thank you for sharing your dad with us.
For that we are richly blessed.
Heck, thanks for sharing your Dad with the world.
post #43 of 57

The mountain will be lonlier

One of my earliest memories is waiting up late for Stu and Carol to roll through Indiana on their way to Lake Tahoe. They'd visit my mom and dad every year as they drove across country. (Dad and Stu when to Mt. Hermon together and Stu's dad, Duncan, taught my dad to ski)

It was like having rock stars roll through town. But, not because Stu was (and still is) a rock star in the ski community, but because he was Stu (and she was Carol). He, and Carol, were larger than life to this small town, Midwestern girl. He was an example that anything you wanted in life was possible and you could create a wonderful life, filled with interesting people and exciting experiences.

My sister and I visited Stu and Carol a few years ago and I knew it would probably be the last time we saw him. During that visit he was so interested in what we were up to and how our lives were shaping up and I swear he still didn't know he was a giant. I'm so happy that my last memories of him are zipping around the mountains in his little silver sports car with the top down and a huge smile on his face.

I hope the powder is deep, the sky is blue, and the runs are clear in heaven. I love you Stu Campbell! Thanks for showing me what's possible (and for getting my dad on the mountain, who in turn got me on the mountain).

Love to Carol, Greg, and Cricket!

Gretchen

p.s. I think we've got some some video of Stu and Carol heli-skiing in Heavenly in 1984. I'll see if I can dig it up and post it. He was beautiful to watch.
post #44 of 57
I met Stu in 1976 at a foggy certification at Killington. We met and skied together many times on both coasts. He was an exeminer when I tried out for the Demo Team. He was running Heavenly when I was Tech Dir at Squaw.

After I'd left skiing, I happened to be on the driving range at the Stowe Country Club in 1993 and he walked by, stopped and turned, and said "Andy Simonds, how are you?" We hadn't seen each other in 10 years!

Since then my wife and I have become friends with Stu and Carol, and spent many weekends in Stowe, skiing and playing golf at the club Stu helped found, Coutry Club of Vermont.

It won't be any fun skiing Stowe knowing I won't run into him for a couple of runs and a few chairlift stories...
post #45 of 57
Thank you Greg, Gretchen, and Andy for giving our community a better view on Stu Campbell's remarkable life. I met him in the PSIA board room, where he struck me as a profound thinker, and just as he wrote with such elegance and quiet humor in his books and articles, he spoke with quiet authority on the political scene too. He made me proud to be a ski instructor. I recall at Stowe last year him telling the group that his mother, who survives him, still asked him when he was going to grow up and get a real job. I will always remember the twinkle in his eye and his signature lopsided grin when he told that story.
post #46 of 57
My loss for not knowing Stu in person. I enjoyed his articles and contributions to skiing and of course the stories from the ESA participants.

Here is his obituary reported in the Burlington Free Press. There is also a guest book link on that site. Those of you who knew him should consider posting to the guest book.

Quote:


STUART DUNCAN CAMPBELL 12/26/42 - 12/04/08 STOWE - Author, skier, Vermont native, Stu Campbell, passed away on Dec. 4, 2008, at his home in Stowe after a 20 year battle with cancer. He was 65. Known throughout the skiing world, Campbell fashioned a career from his own understated elegance, both on skis and with his ability to put words to the act of gliding on snow. He grew up skiing in Bennington and was a 4-event ski racer (slalom, giant slalom, cross-country, ski jumping) while a student at Middlebury College. He graduated from Middlebury in 1964, with a B.A. in American Literature and received his master's degree in English Literature from the University of Vermont in 1972. Campbell taught English Literature and coached skiing at Harwood Union High School and at the Valley Junior Racing Club from 1967-69 before settling in Stowe as Technical Director of the Sepp Ruschp Ski School. Campbell moved from Stowe to Heavenly Valley, Calif., in the late 1970s, where he served as Director of Skier Services. He oversaw Heavenly's ski school, other skier services and a very active race department that hosted World Cup, professional and celebrity ski races. He spent more than a dozen winters at Heavenly (though during that time he continued to spend his summers, writing, in Stowe). He returned to Stowe full time in 1997, and led the development, construction and opening of The Country Club of Vermont, pursuing his late-inlife passion for the sport of golf. Campbell's extraordinary grasp of the technical elements of skiing and ski teaching led him to positions with the Professional Ski Instructors of America as a Demonstration Team member, as co-chairman of the Technical Committee and as an examiner with PSIA's Eastern division. But it was as a writer for Ski Magazine that Campbell mentored the greatest number of skiers. He served as Technical and Instruction Editor at Ski from the mid 1970s until his death, penning everything from illustrated quick tips to feature articles. "The Art of Skiing," Campbell wrote in 1991, "is, ultimately, the search for sensation." He encouraged the reader to use his skis "like a draftsman's compass" to scribe arcs on snow. He saw skis as "tools for sculpting space on the tilt." Campbell also wrote ski instruction books, including "Ski With the Big Boys," "The Way to Ski," and, with Tim Petrick, "Good Things to Know about Gliding on Snow." Some of his Vermont neighbors knew him best for his books on gardening and alternative house design, including 1975's "Let it Rot!," which helped start the home composting movement, and "The Underground House Book" (1980). Campbell and his wife Carol West- Campbell lived for 28 years in a radically earth-bermed house in Stowe. In September, the Vermont Ski Museum awarded Campbell the first Paul Robbins Ski Journalism Award for "lifetime commitment to ski journalism with ethics, humor and good taste..." He told the gathering at the museum to "get up on the mountain and make lots and lots and lots of turns. Every turn you make is good for the soul." He leaves behind his wife of 23years, Carol West; his mother Helen L. Campbell of Stowe; his brother Alan and his wife Heidi of Huntington; his daughter Cricket Kadoch and her husband Aaron of Bend, Ore., and his son Gregory of Waterbury; along with two grandsons, Aiden Jacob Duncan and Joshua Stuart Asher; three nephews, Mason, Abbott and Owen Rachampbell; and an aunt Virginia Thomas of Bakersfield. Services will be held at the Stowe Community Church on Monday, Dec. 8, at 11 a.m.
Quote:
STUART DUNCAN CAMPBELL 12/26/42 - 12/04/08
STOWE -- Author, skier, Vermont native, Stu Campbell, passed away on Dec. 4, 2008, at his home in Stowe after a 20 year battle with cancer. He was 65.

Known throughout the skiing world, Campbell fashioned a career from his own understated elegance, both on skis and with his ability to put words to the act of gliding on snow.

He grew up skiing in Bennington and was a 4-event ski racer (slalom, giant slalom, cross-country, ski jumping) while a student at Middlebury College. He graduated from Middlebury in 1964, with a B.A. in American Literature and received his master's degree in English Literature from the University of Vermont in 1972.

Campbell taught English Literature and coached skiing at Harwood Union High School and at the Valley Junior Racing Club from 1967-69 before settling in Stowe as Technical Director of the Sepp Ruschp Ski School. Campbell moved from Stowe to Heavenly Valley, Calif., in the late 1970s, where he served as Director of Skier Services. He oversaw Heavenly's ski school, other skier services and a very active race department that hosted World Cup, professional and celebrity ski races. He spent more than a dozen winters at Heavenly (though during that time he continued to spend his summers, writing, in Stowe). He returned to Stowe full time in 1997, and led the development, construction and opening of The Country Club of Vermont, pursuing his late-in-life passion for the sport of golf.

Campbell's extraordinary grasp of the technical elements of skiing and ski teaching led him to positions with the Professional Ski Instructors of America as a Demonstration Team member, as co-chairman of the Technical Committee and as an examiner with PSIA's Eastern division.

But it was as a writer for Ski Magazine that Campbell mentored the greatest number of skiers. He served as Technical and Instruction Editor at Ski from the mid 1970s until his death, penning everything from illustrated quick tips to feature articles. "The Art of Skiing," Campbell wrote in 1991, "is, ultimately, the search for sensation." He encouraged the reader to use his skis "like a draftsman's compass" to scribe arcs on snow. He saw skis as "tools for sculpting space on the tilt."
Campbell also wrote ski instruction books, including "Ski With the Big Boys," "The Way to Ski," and, with Tim Petrick, "Good Things to Know about Gliding on Snow."

Some of his Vermont neighbors knew him best for his books on gardening and alternative house design, including 1975's "Let it Rot!," which helped start the home composting movement, and "The Underground House Book" (1980). Campbell and his wife Carol West- Campbell lived for 28 years in a radically earth-bermed house in Stowe.

In September, the Vermont Ski Museum awarded Campbell the first Paul Robbins Ski Journalism Award for "lifetime commitment to ski journalism with ethics, humor and good taste..." He told the gathering at the museum to "get up on the mountain and make lots and lots and lots of turns. Every turn you make is good for the soul."

He leaves behind his wife of 23years, Carol West; his mother Helen L. Campbell of Stowe; his brother Alan and his wife Heidi of Huntington; his daughter Cricket Kadoch and her husband Aaron of Bend, Ore., and his son Gregory of Waterbury; along with two grandsons, Aiden Jacob Duncan and Joshua Stuart Asher; three nephews, Mason, Abbott and Owen Rachampbell; and an aunt Virginia Thomas of Bakersfield.

Services will be held at the Stowe Community Church on Monday, Dec. 8, at 11 a.m.
Life Story • Guest Book • Funeral home directory • Flowers • Gift Shop
post #47 of 57

Tribute Page

EpicSki's Tribute Page to Stu.

Thanks to Doug Neiner for pulling this together for us.
post #48 of 57

Stu Campbell

Stu gave the eulogy for Gentleman Jim Merunowicz at Prospect Mountain in Bennington some 25 years ago - thoughtful words about a local guy who, as a ski patrol man had helped lots of folks to ski, and who had his passport to the new world stamped by Karol Wojtyła, an obscure bureaucrat in pre-war Poland - to a crowd of a couple dozen standing in the autumn mist in the Green Mountains.
post #49 of 57
. . . and that guy "Karol" became the Pope of the Catholic Church, recently deceased. We all are touched by each other in some way - isn't it amazing? And Stu, bless him, touched so many. I was at Smuggs today in Sherm White's office and saw that he had on the wall, where he could see it as he sat at his desk, a photo of the last ski run of Stu's life. Sherm said Stu was in pain when that photo was taken - but if you look at the photo, you see the same person you've seen skiing at ESA in Stowe. That form and style that's immediately recognizable. Sherm said, "Whenever I have a crappy day, I look at that picture, and everything is alright."
post #50 of 57
Stu changed me as a skier . . .
.
Stu's beautiful wife is an extraordinary woman who left a mark of grace upon my heart.
.
God knows, I am blessed that these people came into my life.
post #51 of 57

Goodbye Stu Campbell

I worked for Stu at Heavenly when he was the Director of Skier Services...he and his wife gave me one of their Yorkie puppies, Bailey. What an extreme pleasure it was to work with Stu and get to know Carol West. Probably the best job I have ever had. I feel honored to be able to say that I got a chance to know Stu Campbell - the best quote I have heard hits the nail on the head "A Mighty Tree Has Fallen".

Stu...you have touched many many lives...you will truly be missed but NEVER forgotten.

Thank you for being you!!
Kimba
post #52 of 57
I just saw this, what a horrible shock. He was way too young, surely. I very much enjoyed skiing and talking with him, he was a real gentleman and one of the most skilled clinicians I've ever trained with.
post #53 of 57
I was replaying Stu's podcast again today and was struck (again!) by the depth of knowledge he had and the great repository of technical knowledge and history that he provided to Epic Ski members in that podcast. Add to that his writing in Ski Magazine and his books on skiing plus all his teaching and the ski world has really lost a great advocate and all round nice person.

I met Stu at Snowbird at ESA a few years ago and was struck then by his unassuming, self-effacing attitude and his great store of knowledge and of anecdotes, often whimsical! I didn't know until I read the obituaries that Stu was a fellow prostate cancer sufferer which makes his passing all the sadder. I'm going to be skiing in Japan in a few weeks time and will make some turns in his memory. Vale!
post #54 of 57
The International Skiing History Association is honoring Stu in December with their second Ski Pioneer Award. They have a corresponding ISHA Pioneer fund. Your donation in Stu’s memory will support ISHA’s mission “to preserve skiing history and increase awareness of the sport’s heritage.” Donors of $100 or more will receive a specially designed Stu Campbell memorial ski pin. All donors will be recognized in the March 2010 issue of SKIING HERITAGE magazine. Please make your check payable to ISHA.  Indicate “Stu Campbell Pioneer Fund” on the check and send to the address below.  (ISHA is a 501(c) (3) charitable organization).
  

International Skiing History Association

4582 South Ulster Street   Suite 1340

Denver, Colorado 80237

303-892-0903

post #55 of 57
 Thanks for sharing this Rusty...
He most definitely made his mark.
http://esa.epicski.com/stu-campbell-tribute/
post #56 of 57
 This is a pin I'll be happy to wear.
post #57 of 57
Thread Starter 
 Did anybody else get their pin? The article about Stu is great, btw.
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