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Retail shop boot swap

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 
Abbey got new boots this year. We bought them and they were snug (24.5). Her toes were curled.

She got them home and I told her to wear them so her feet would get used to the new feel. She complained that they were too small. So we took them back and he gave us the next size up. I was reluctant.

Abbey skied on the new boots, the larger size, 3 times. Her ankle bone was killing her, so we went back. The fitter made her footbeds and swapped the 25.5 for 24.5. She liked the new fit a lot. The footbed may have relieve the toe curling a bit.

I was surprised that he would take the larger boot back after having skied it. This boot fitter has a great reputation but swapping boots like this is not business as usual.

Have you ever seen this happen before? I am impressed by the service of this fitter/shop.
post #2 of 18
Absolutely, a quality shop would do that, one of the reasons you buy boots in person and not on line. On the other side, this could have easily been addressed in the first visit in setting her up in the boot properly from the start. Sounds like she has some significant pronation with her ankle rolling in and her foot expanding out.
post #3 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post
Absolutely, a quality shop would do that, one of the reasons you buy boots in person and not on line. On the other side, this could have easily been addressed in the first visit in setting her up in the boot properly from the start. Sounds like she has some significant pronation with her ankle rolling in and her foot expanding out.
Phil, she is in the original boot that we walked out the door with day one. She is the one who complained about the crunched toes, so we went back and he put her in the larger boot.

Pronation, yes - just like her old man. Footbed will make a huge difference.

I don't think the service would have been as good on-line.
post #4 of 18
My boot guy gives you a three visit promise. If he can't get you "set up" in three visits he takes the boots back.

This is why you take the time to go to a shop, and get personal treatment.
post #5 of 18
Thread Starter 
E-bay has the same policy
post #6 of 18
Hi PJ,
Most reputable shops with skilled bootfitters will do that. Their return rates on boots are so small, that they can afford to take a return or two. These shop can sell the returned boots at a discount, but they'll make up for the loss with returning customers.

Dennis
post #7 of 18
At least 75% of the skiing public will buy their boots too large if the shop lets them do so. The rationale is "that's what they want" and unfortunately that's largely true.

Often, the fitter will talk the skier through the purchase, fit the boot with nice thin socks, explain the fit etc and get the correct size and model out the door. Then the skier goes home, puts the boot on (maybe with different socks) and then sits on the couch for a while. It is almost a sure thing that the skier will then forget everything the fitter said and decide the boot is too small. That is almost a sure recipie for a return. Fortunately for you, the fitter in this case did the right thing. Unfortunately, he had to do it in three visits after doing the right thing the first time.

SJ
post #8 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SierraJim View Post
Unfortunately, he had to do it in three visits after doing the right thing the first time.

SJ
This is true. A sales kid did the fitting on the first visit. I shell fitted the boot and agreed that the 24.5 was correct. When we went back the owner wanted to do a footbed and we should have done it then. Instead Abbey wanted to go bigger. I was trying to cut corners. The foodbed helped correct the length problem and she likes the fit now. We'll see what happens when she skis.
post #9 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul Jones View Post
E-bay has the same policy
And, if you use PayPal, they double that warranty.
post #10 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul Jones View Post
..., so we went back. The fitter made her footbeds and swapped the 25.5 for 24.5. She liked the new fit a lot. The footbed may have relieve the toe curling a bit.

.
Why no footbeds out of the gate the first time? Most of the bootfitting types I know would be somewhere between reluctant and unwilling to put someone in a set of boots without an upgraded/heat molded footbed. Did you guys decline or was it never suggested?
post #11 of 18
Did she end up wearing the same boots as you took home (and skied on) the first time? If not assuming that both the shell and liner were the same size, it might have something to do with the forward lean of the boots. Either way, the jammed/curled toes probably was due to her foot position inside the boots caused by the ankle flex --meaning she was more upright so the heels weren't pulled back enough. The extra volumn in the large size gave her a feeling of fit even though her feet were more forward than it needs to be. Meanwhile, her feet shifted constantly when she started skiing. Her ankle pain after skiing is sort of telling us that. The new and better insole has a heel cup (amongst many other features) that allowed her feet to be situated more naturally and with more stability inside the boots.
post #12 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by spindrift View Post
Why no footbeds out of the gate the first time? Most of the bootfitting types I know would be somewhere between reluctant and unwilling to put someone in a set of boots without an upgraded/heat molded footbed. Did you guys decline or was it never suggested?
That was part of my question initially. I am no means up to the level of the most of pros here, but even I do that, even for a lower level skier.
post #13 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by chanwmr View Post
Did she end up wearing the same boots as you took home (and skied on) the first time? .... The extra volumn in the large size gave her a feeling of fit even though her feet were more forward than it needs to be. Meanwhile, her feet shifted constantly when she started skiing. Her ankle pain after skiing is sort of telling us that. The new and better insole has a heel cup (amongst many other features) that allowed her feet to be situated more naturally and with more stability inside the boots.
We came out of the shop in October with 24.5s. She did not ski on them because while wearing them around the house her toes were killing her.

At her insistance we went back to the shop, this time working with the boot fitter. He gave her the larger boot, 25.5 but was not happy about it. He strongly recommended footbeds after closely looking and flexing her leg, ankle and foot. I declined due to cost.

She skied 3xs on the 25.5 and each time things got worse. First she told me that her foot was sliding forward and I told her, that was because the boot was too big. On the last day her ankle bone was in so much pain that she was unable to ski.

We went back to the fitter and he showed us how the foot/ankle bones were moving, alternating up and down and that the footbed would fix that. He prepared the footbed and suggested the 24.5. With the footbed and smaller boot, she was happy. He also built up the front of the board under the liner.

That's how it went down. I felt that she should be able to ski in a boot right off the shelf however her foot is skinny and very flexible.

She has yet to ski in the boot. But she "lit-up" at the final product and felt like this set-up should work well.
post #14 of 18
Thread Starter 
Also, the footbed is very well made. This guy is a racing coach and is a highly regarded fitter.
post #15 of 18
Ahh, the missing pieces . I agree now, the shop went way out of their way to replace a boot that they suggested you not buy, especially that is now used for full credit. They will make that bit of a loss in future business from you.
post #16 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post
They will make that bit of a loss in future business from you.
I suspect he already has. I have referred many to him - including myself, a boot fitter's nightmare
post #17 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul Jones View Post
She skied 3xs on the 25.5 and each time things got worse. First she told me that her foot was sliding forward and I told her, that was because the boot was too big. On the last day her ankle bone was in so much pain that she was unable to ski.
I suspect you were exactly right. There was too much volume inside the boot: particularly in length and around the ankle (in effect affects the pressure point at the cuff as well). Hence, she was sliding in the boots too much length wise and flexing uneffectively at the ankle (probably rubbed it against the boot as well). With that said, with some kids with a fuller foot volume, they are able to tighten down the buckles of slightly larger boots to confine the feet from moving inside the boots. It doesn't sound like that was the case with your daughter. Are these boots, 3 buckles, 4 buckles? With or without a power strap? Just curious.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul Jones View Post
I suspect he already has. I have referred many to him - including myself, a boot fitter's nightmare
Plus he sold you the not-so-cheap foot bed. Nothing wrong with that, but just saying...
post #18 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by chanwmr View Post
Are these boots, 3 buckles, 4 buckles? With or without a power strap? Just curious.

Plus he sold you the not-so-cheap foot bed. Nothing wrong with that, but just saying...
The boot is the Tecnica - Attiva V70+ Ultrafit. 4 buckle with power strap.

It is the top of the line, the footbed. She is an Intermediate, high side.
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