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Quads and hamstring question

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 
After skiing I often get serious cramps in my hamstrings; sometimes even while driving home.
For a few days after skiing, my quads are usually so sore that I have trouble going down stairs in my house; I limp down one step at a time.
Does anyone have any ideas what I can do to deal with the leg problems?
I ski fast on ice; no bumps.
post #2 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phlogiston View Post
After skiing I often get serious cramps in my hamstrings; sometimes even while driving home.
Drink lots of fluids (No, not that kind).
post #3 of 18
How are your boots fitting you? And, are you in the backseat when you get going? Do you feel nervous or calm when you ski?
post #4 of 18
Try static stretching after you ski, focusing on those muscles. I highly recommend picking up a foam roller and using that on your quads/hams/IT band (google it) 2-3 times a week for 15-20min at a time, it will be extremely painful at first but help a lot with soreness and recovery time.
post #5 of 18

delayed soreness in quads

you dont mention any exercise routine to ready yourself for skiing.if you dont do anything,you should expect to be sore.

if i could only do one exercise ,it would be squat jumps. if you start with just a few and work up slowly you can pretty much avoid quad soreness with skiing . its also pretty aerobic as the reps increase.

my hams dont hurt,so im not sure about those,but step-ups on a chair for pre-conditioning and lunges also work.
post #6 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by chanwmr View Post
How are your boots fitting you? And, are you in the backseat when you get going? Do you feel nervous or calm when you ski?
Actually, I feel ecstatic when I ski. So I guess that's a bit of both.
post #7 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by gramboh View Post
Try static stretching after you ski, focusing on those muscles. I highly recommend picking up a foam roller and using that on your quads/hams/IT band (google it) 2-3 times a week for 15-20min at a time, it will be extremely painful at first but help a lot with soreness and recovery time.
Wow. Thank you. I've suffered from ITBS at times for years without knowing what it was called. I always thought 'oh, there's that pain I get when I do a lot of cycling and hiking during the summer'.
When I was treated by an orthopedist for my crushed shoulder, torn meniscus and piriformis syndrome, the IT band wasn't bothering me, because i'd been inactive for months following my accident, and so I never mentioned it to the Dr.
One more problem with initials for me to worry about.
post #8 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by chanwmr View Post
How are your boots fitting you?
My boots with the expensive custom made liners from Surefoot don't fit very well at all. However, they fit badly at the start of the season when I'm struggling scrape my way down the mountain in pain; and they fit badly later in the season, when I'm shooting down the black diamonds for six hours, driving to NYC, and spending 3 more hours at a cocktail party, on my feet, without any pain.
As Cassius said: 'the fault, dear Brutus, is not in our boots but in ourselves'.
Julius Caesar (I, ii, 140-141)
post #9 of 18
I would consider your fluid/electrolyte levels as well as your fitness and stretching routines. In addition to my exercise I usually spend 15 minutes or so stretching every evening. Usually in any kind of exercise for me if I cramp I can point to less fluids over the days leading up to the exercise (not just the day of!) and depending on the sweat levels I may or may not need electrolytes added.
post #10 of 18
Thread Starter 
I think you're on to something there. My sinuses swell up from the cold, and I find myself doing a lot of mouth breathing during a day of skiing.
This, of course, leads to a serious loss of fluids. Lungfulls of dry air get sucked in, humidified, and blown back out, for hours.
post #11 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phlogiston View Post
I think you're on to something there. My sinuses swell up from the cold, and I find myself doing a lot of mouth breathing during a day of skiing.
This, of course, leads to a serious loss of fluids. Lungfulls of dry air get sucked in, humidified, and blown back out, for hours.
Notice that this doesn't lose salt Sweat loses salt.
post #12 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by comprex View Post
Notice that this doesn't lose salt Sweat loses salt.
Yes, in this case I would say plain water should be fine with no electrolyte replacement (more than just salt). Personally, I prefer to load up my hydration through the week with 75-100 ounces of water daily so that I don't need to carry a hydration pack but you may need to look at carrying one. Additionally, I will always drink some water during bathroom/lunch breaks.

Do you have any cramping issues during other types of exercise?
post #13 of 18
Thread Starter 
I was sweating too; but I'm sure I was dehydrated mainly from breathing.
post #14 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by COSkiGirl View Post
Yes, in this case I would say plain water should be fine with no electrolyte replacement (more than just salt). Personally, I prefer to load up my hydration through the week with 75-100 ounces of water daily so that I don't need to carry a hydration pack but you may need to look at carrying one. Additionally, I will always drink some water during bathroom/lunch breaks.

Do you have any cramping issues during other types of exercise?
OOPS. I've created confusion here.
I had NO cramping problems during or after skiing on Monday, nor since returning. Not ONE cramp.
I started this thread fully expecing a repeat of my previous experience.
The cramping after skiing happened during every season prior to this one, and I expected it to repeat this year. It didn't.
Since coming back from skiing I've been up and down ladders and stairs decorating my house for Xmas. Very little soreness.

Is it possible to delete a thread here, since the problem didn't occur?
post #15 of 18
I wouldn't delete, this info might help another person now or in the future.
post #16 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phlogiston View Post
Is it possible to delete a thread here, since the problem didn't occur?
It is, but your question has provided some good information on the importance of hydration and nutrition that others will find useful.

What COSkiGirl said.
post #17 of 18
All of the info here is helpful, but I have found that serious high intensity workout that includes strength training to be the ticket. Not only have my legs performed better, but my whole body "chips in" to help performance.

Strong legs will help. But you need it all...core.

So squats and dead lifts come to mind, but conditioning should be broad in scope. Although you may feel it in your legs, it is an overall fitness issue.

I have the same problem with my legs and serious training is helping a lot.
post #18 of 18
Thread Starter 
OK, I won't delete it.
There is something very surreal about this situation. A great first day of skiing; no leg cramps - just a pleasant soreness; and this completely unexpected new problem of cold feet and hands.
It's disorienting, the problem I expected and dreaded never happened, and this other thing did.
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