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Boot balance check

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
This weekend i was in a local ski shop and observed the bootfitter doing an exercise to evaluate boot balance that i am not familiar with?
He had the buyer get on a platform then jump down to see if he could land in balance. Not sure what he would do if balance was not achieved but he was using this as some kind of test for the suitablity of the boot and it's adjustments. I have never heard of anything like this on this forum and was wondering if anyone else does this and what it indicates???

KLM
post #2 of 13
Smoke & mirrors.
post #3 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by klm View Post
This weekend i was in a local ski shop and observed the bootfitter doing an exercise to evaluate boot balance that i am not familiar with?
He had the buyer get on a platform then jump down to see if he could land in balance. Not sure what he would do if balance was not achieved but he was using this as some kind of test for the suitablity of the boot and it's adjustments. I have never heard of anything like this on this forum and was wondering if anyone else does this and what it indicates???

KLM
The test you are describing is the recently developed Huckkings test. My understanding is that it was developed in response to deal with the changes seen in the sport of skiing. Hopefully there will be a seminar in my area soon so I can get certified.
post #4 of 13
Any time you do a "test" you need to think about the following factors:

1) Sensitivity - does the test pick up what you're really looking for?

2) Specificity - does the test rule out clutter, i.e. data you're not looking for?

3) Positive predictive value - statistically a combination of the above 2 factors, but in a real world sense - does the test tell you anything useful about skiing (from jumping indoors)?

As I said, smoke and mirrors.
post #5 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by jdistefa View Post
Any time you do a "test" you need to think about the following factors:

1) Sensitivity - does the test pick up what you're really looking for?

2) Specificity - does the test rule out clutter, i.e. data you're not looking for?

3) Positive predictive value - statistically a combination of the above 2 factors, but in a real world sense - does the test tell you anything useful about skiing (from jumping indoors)?

As I said, smoke and mirrors.
It was developed as part of a doctoral thesis. The candidate, by the name of Hucking, was a non-skier and researched the sport by viewing recent ski movies. It was obvious the participant of the sport spend a majority of their time in the air and most injures occurred upon landing. Past slow motion studies of cats showed that they were always able to land on their feet. Since skiers lack a tail it was necessary to find another solution. It was discovered that changing the ratio of 'sprung' to 'unsprung' weight was a solution. Initially this was accomplished by removal of unnecessary brain tissue as many of those representing the sport were considered to be 'half brained'. This procedure though successful was not cost effective. Research showed the ratio changes could be altered in two ways lightening the sprung weight (remove unnecessary brain tissue) or increasing unsprung weight (adding weight under the skiers foot) which is less invasive, more cost effective and creates a market for a new product line. The products developed so far are weighted footbeds and lead heel lifts with others to follow. If properly weighted it has been found the skier (sometimes now referred to as the HUCKER) usually lands feet first.
post #6 of 13
Ah... that explains terrain parks.

We would all ski better with some brain removed (left side) .
post #7 of 13
Ray:
Now that I've read your explanation I'm even more interested. Can you tell me if there are levels to this certification and if I can test out of the lower levels and move right on to Master's of Hukking?
post #8 of 13
Thread Starter 
So by some of these responses I take it this has no practical purpose. I have to add this guy is supposed to be a goto guy in our area. He talks a good game. Heard him say that he choses the boot characteristics for the skier then he modifies it for the foot. He can fit most any foot into most any boot. That sounded just wrong to me. Better stay clear of this shop.

KLM
post #9 of 13
Your last statement does not seem as out of line as the "jump test".

I do not agree with Raycantu's story on where the practice came from, although it has a familar smell to it.

When I was working in racing service for Salomon, I was dispatched by the sales manager to Killington VT to build boots for Preston Smith, the then owner of Killington, and some whack job Eastern PSIA examiner, that proceded to jump off of 2 steps in the house to "test" the balance of the boots I was building for him. Needless to say I packed up all of my tools as fast as I could and got the hell out of there before any of this guys insanity rubbed off on me. They say that insanity is hereditary, you know bootfitters can get it from their clients.

Was this guy in Killington?

jim
post #10 of 13
Thread Starter 
Jim,

No, I'm not saying who it was just that I found the jumping practice questionable and thought his statement about fitting any boot more indicative of the limited number of boots he had on his wall. I've watched this shops inventory selection shrink over the years and I bet it's not uncommon in todays market.
He was selling to a begginer and I thought it was all a little underhanded and sending some wrong messages that this guy was going to take to the hill. Like I said this guy is supposed to have a big rep around here as a boot fitter, I'll keep my business with Benny at the Inner Bootworks. More bootfitting less bullshit!

KLM
post #11 of 13
Quote:
I'll keep my business with Benny at the Inner Bootworks. More bootfitting less bullshit!
probably the most sensible thing posted in this thread...good call
post #12 of 13
+1 for Benny.

jim
post #13 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by RayCantu View Post
It was developed as part of a doctoral thesis. The candidate, by the name of Hucking, was a non-skier and researched the sport by viewing recent ski movies. It was obvious the participant of the sport spend a majority of their time in the air and most injures occurred upon landing. Past slow motion studies of cats showed that they were always able to land on their feet. Since skiers lack a tail it was necessary to find another solution. It was discovered that changing the ratio of 'sprung' to 'unsprung' weight was a solution. Initially this was accomplished by removal of unnecessary brain tissue as many of those representing the sport were considered to be 'half brained'. This procedure though successful was not cost effective. Research showed the ratio changes could be altered in two ways lightening the sprung weight (remove unnecessary brain tissue) or increasing unsprung weight (adding weight under the skiers foot) which is less invasive, more cost effective and creates a market for a new product line. The products developed so far are weighted footbeds and lead heel lifts with others to follow. If properly weighted it has been found the skier (sometimes now referred to as the HUCKER) usually lands feet first.
I nominate this as one of the best posts in a long while.
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