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Alpine Trekker

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
I did a search and have read what was already discussed about them but wanted to bring up the topic again. I am wondering what your thoughts are. I would be doing very short tours (1-2 hut trips scheduled for this spring) and some side-country type stuff. I really just want to find out if hiking for my turns is something I'd like to invest some serious money in. Likeyl hiking Berthoud/Loveland passes. At the moment I don't have the money for a new set-up (although I'd like one). Are they somewhat hastle free to get in and out of? I don't mind the extra weight considering snowshoes are my other alterative. Thanks.
post #2 of 13
I don't have the experience of most here but I do have a set of trekkers. I used them twice last April. A practice run uphill at a resort and then a week later at Mount Washington. At the resort I probably covered 1 mile with 3/4 going uphill. At Mount Washington I did about 2 miles or so (not sure exact distance) all uphill.

I would offer that they work as described. I've nothing to compare it too but with the trekkers and skins I was able to go up some fairly good size inclines.

What I did notice right away was that you will be a few inches taller. It felt awkward at first but you get used to it. They don't seem very good at down hill, but I only used them twice. I'm planning to use them more this year.

My set up was WAY HEAVY. I had a 40 # pack and my skis are Metron B5. The trekkers are solid. You have some choices in setting your forward lean to match your incline and that needs to be played with.

I would think that if you're going for speed or comfort there are probably better ways to spend your money. You'll still be in your Alpine boots so it helps to have (I think) a softer flex or loose buckles. If you aren't concerned about speed and comfort then the trekkers will get you where you want to go. They definitely beat snow shoes as you want have to carry your skis and boots (about 20#).

Again, I only used them twice and I never used anything else.

Ken
post #3 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by drewski180 View Post
I did a search and have read what was already discussed about them but wanted to bring up the topic again. I am wondering what your thoughts are. I would be doing very short tours (1-2 hut trips scheduled for this spring) and some side-country type stuff. I really just want to find out if hiking for my turns is something I'd like to invest some serious money in. Likeyl hiking Berthoud/Loveland passes. At the moment I don't have the money for a new set-up (although I'd like one). Are they somewhat hastle free to get in and out of? I don't mind the extra weight considering snowshoes are my other alterative. Thanks.
first alpine trekker work but tend to be cumbersome and not worth the time or money to buy for alot of people.

I could sell you some 185 snoops with naxos and skin for 300 dollars. everything is nearlly new shape.
post #4 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post
I could sell you some 185 snoops with naxos and skin for 300 dollars. everything is nearlly new shape.

If I were drewski I would jump on that like a rat on Cheeto
post #5 of 13
If you don't want to take BW's terrific deal, I have a pair of Trekkers in great shape you can have for $75.
post #6 of 13
Thread Starter 
Dp, I PMed you about the trekkers.
Sorry bushwackerin, I don't have the funds at the moment to add a new ski to my quiver. I'd also like to make sure I like working for my turns before I make a large investment.
FYI, I did a forum search on Snoops b/c I didn't know much about them and I saw you had offered to sell them in an earlier post for $250. (You may have your reasons for doing this but doesn't make sense to bump the price up as time goes on). Thanks for the offer regardless, if I had a little more cash I wouldn't mind spending the $300 anyway.
post #7 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by drewski180 View Post
Dp, I PMed you about the trekkers.
Sorry bushwackerin, I don't have the funds at the moment to add a new ski to my quiver. I'd also like to make sure I like working for my turns before I make a large investment.
FYI, I did a forum search on Snoops b/c I didn't know much about them and I saw you had offered to sell them in an earlier post for $250. (You may have your reasons for doing this but doesn't make sense to bump the price up as time goes on). Thanks for the offer regardless, if I had a little more cash I wouldn't mind spending the $300 anyway.
its does when they are so cheap

if thats you reason for not buying them you spending more money than you have to.
post #8 of 13
Thread Starter 
haha, no thats not the reason at all. I just thought it was funny. I already have a ski with an 85mm waist so the next ski I add to my quiver will likely be a true powder ski. Does sound like I great deal though, thanks. I will likely invest in the trekkers and if I like the BC I'll buy an AT setup next year.
post #9 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by dp View Post
If you don't want to take BW's terrific deal, I have a pair of Trekkers in great shape you can have for $75.
Beat me to it.

Drewski, Trekkers are a good way to stick your toe in the water for BC skiing, as you've surmised. They make the transition slower, which can be a bit of a drag for all concerned if you're out with a bunch of folks with regular setups. They're too clunky as a long-term answer.

I've kept mine around for a couple of years for friends to use to ski with me when they don't have BC setups, just resort gear.
post #10 of 13
Buy some snake skins and you'll be perfect! BWPs deal seemed great to me. I hate the Trekker, but it is a cheap way to get into it. I doubt that you will be happy with them in even the short term if you decide you enjoy touring. I guess you could keep them for your friends like mt girl suggested.
post #11 of 13
If your going to spend $$ on a hut yurt trip and do it with treckers you better have a spair or practice bootpacking.
They don't call them alpine tour wreckers for nothing.
If you just need to do a little sidecountry or your not planning on touring far they will occasionally work but for a hut trip or any thing involving steep switchbacks or long approaches these are a waste of time and money IMO
post #12 of 13
A naive question, do you take them off when going downhill? Or do they function like a binding and you ski with then on uphill and downhill?
post #13 of 13
Yes, you take them off to ski. They click into your binding just like your boot does, and attach to the boot like a rapidfix crampon.
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